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Symphonies - Released January 6, 2017 | Universal Music Group International

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
Daniel Barenboim has long held a deep affinity for the epic symphonies of Anton Bruckner, and by recording them with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and the Staatskapelle Berlin, he has demonstrated a profound understanding of the music, comparable in importance to the interpretations of such legends as Günter Wand, Georg Tintner, and Eugen Jochum. This live cycle on Deutsche Grammophon with the Staatskapelle Berlin presents only the nine numbered symphonies, unlike Barenboim's Chicago Symphony set, which included the Symphony in D minor, "Die Nullte," along with the Te Deum, and the Berlin Philharmonic set, which offered the choral work Helgoland. Barenboim has chosen a mix of original versions and revisions, relying for the most part on Leopold Nowak's editions, though the seldom-heard 1878 version of the Symphony No. 3 in D minor appears in the 1950 edition by Fritz Oeser, and the Symphony No. 8 in C minor is the 1939 edition by Robert Haas, not the 1887 original, as listed. These are the finer points which serious Bruckner fans will note, though the popular Symphony No. 4 in E flat major, "Romantic," and the Symphony No. 7 in E major will be quite familiar to many listeners, and the remaining symphonies present no obstacles for appreciation. Bruckner devotees will acquire this set for the sake of completeness, though newcomers to the symphonies should give these inspired readings a try. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 25, 2005 | Warner Classics International

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released March 16, 1987 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Symphonic Music - Released April 25, 2000 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released April 11, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
This 2011 release of Frédéric Chopin's Piano Concertos No. 1 and No. 2 is a first for Daniel Barenboim, who previously recorded the complete Nocturnes for Deutsche Grammophon, some of the solo piano music for EMI, and perhaps most famously, the Cello Sonata in G minor with his late wife, Jacqueline du Pré. Otherwise, Barenboim has appeared to have neglected Chopin, and that's a shame, because this music is tailor-made for him. Indeed, he is quoted on the CD: "When I play Chopin I feel a kind of purely physical pleasure that I get from no other composer's music." Regarded as an introspective pianist who plays with his emotions held close to the vest, rather than worn on his sleeve, Barenboim finds an expressive match in Chopin, who was similarly reserved, rarely demonstrative, and suspicious of grandiose displays. The concertos are models of pianistic decorum, far from the splashy showpieces of Franz Liszt, and the modest expressions of the music hearken back to the Classical era, especially to Chopin's idol, Mozart. Barenboim and the Staatskapelle Berlin, conducted by Andris Nelsons, at times produce a sound that is almost Mozartian in its elegant tone and gossamer texture, and even though they are fully aware that they are playing Chopin, the tasteful balance they strike is something both composers would have appreciated. The concertos were recorded live at the 2010 Ruhr Piano Festival, so there are some incidental noises that serve as reminders, especially whenever Barenboim thumps his foot, but the sound is surprisingly clean, close-up, and vivid for a concert recording. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 29, 2006 | Warner Classics International

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released November 27, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released June 4, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Daniel Barenboim has sometimes performed the music of Debussy, especially during the later part of his career, but Debussy interpretations are not something for which he is particularly known. Thus this release of Debussy works, on the rare side except for La Mer at the end, is commendable; it shows Barenboim, approaching his 80th year, continuing to take chances and explore new repertory. The show opens with the Fantaisie for piano and orchestra, L 73, not commonly heard, although it is really Debussy's only piano concerto. It's an early work, but more than most other Debussy pieces from the period, it shows the composer injecting his own style at every turn into a framework of Massenet and, especially, Franck. Barenboim teams with pianist Martha Argerich, and the pair offers a relaxed performance that brings out the proto-Impressionist touches. In the terse, dark Violin Sonata, L 140, and Cello Sonata, L. 135, Barenboim at the keyboard is joined by son Michael Barenboim and Kian Soltani, respectively, with impressively spare results. La Mer, with Barenboim leading the Staatskapelle Dresden, is clean and effective if not revelatory. Recorded in 2018 and released in 2021, this is a worthy entry in Barenboim's remarkable late-life catalog. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1994 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Concertos - Released August 2, 2013 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Daniel Barenboim is no stranger to complete collections. Glutton that he is, he records them several times over, whether it's Beethoven's Sonatas, or as here, Mozart's Trios (already recorded for EMI in 2006 with violinist Nicolai Znaider and cellist Kyril Zlotnikov). And so it's not the immortal Amadeus that we are hearing so much as a portrait of Barenboim that ages with the years. The accomplished artists create a close dialogue, greedily following each other's music. Amongst all these scores, can we detect an aesthetic vision? The scores follow one after the other, like at a family musical soirée, with a convivial, sweetish piano sound – likely a matter of sound quality rather than sherry consumption – in particular on the Piano Trio in B Flat Major, K.502, but also in the opening passages of the Allegro of the Piano Trio in E Major, K.542, whose dramatic dimension is somewhat lacking here. But at least the piano doesn't overshadow the strings or upset the balance required in these tightly-wound, respected works. Mozart's chamber music isn't simple: the contrapunctual writing builds a delicate world whose poetry is flavoured by harmonies and chromatism. Daniel Barenboim has found some fitting partners. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 30, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released May 24, 2005 | Warner Classics International

It is always amazing that Bach's keyboard music is robust enough to withstand so many interpretations and transcriptions. Here, the piano is not so far removed from the original keyboards of Bach's time, but the interpretation by Daniel Barenboim of the Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1, is slightly unusual. Most piano performances of this work fall into one of two schools: either they are played with gracefulness and little coloring, as if they were played on a harpsichord, or they are played with large amounts of color and several dynamic, emotional layers. Barenboim's interpretation falls almost exactly in between those two extremes, but leans toward the more colorful side of the scale. He plays with grace or with stronger colors where he deems necessary, but never exaggerates. In some of the fugues and a few of the preludes, such as the Prelude and Fugue in B flat No. 21, he does use more pedal and contrasting dynamics as if to emulate the sonorities of an organ. In others, such as the well-worn Prelude No. 1 and the Prelude No. 2, he uses different touches, never playing the repeated rhythms the same way all through the piece and taking advantage of the contrast between legato and staccato, to create more musically interesting phrases within each piece. That alone refreshingly sets these apart from other performances, where those preludes are treated more like etudes with the object of making sure a particular technique is learned through strict repetition. Barenboim seems to look at each piece in the WTC not as a music exercise, but as a musical testimonial. The sound quality is very good throughout, making this a very respectable alternative to overly Romantic or more historically informed piano performances of WTC, Book 1. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1994 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 26, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Somewhat surprisingly, Daniel Barenboim recorded the 11 complete piano sonatas of Franz Schubert for the first time between 2013 and 2014, thus making this Deutsche Grammophon box set an important first-time release. For admirers of Barenboim's intellectual depth and clean playing, his approach to these works may be ideal, because Schubert's music is always vulnerable to overly ripe or sloppy interpretations, and it takes a balance of ideas and emotions to convey the essence of the sonatas. While Barenboim has established himself as a masterful accompanist in Schubert, playing chamber works and lieder cycles, he has touched the solo keyboard works less often. However, these performances of the sonatas are as cogent and competent as if he had specialized in them for decades. Touch is critical in Schubert, and Barenboim's refined playing shows a remarkable control of dynamics, colors, and shadings, which, together with his eloquent phrasing and careful use of the pedals, make it subtle and compelling for its variety. While the studio recordings are a bit dry, presumably to aid in clarity, the piano has a slightly ringing quality in the upper register and a warm middle to low range, so it has an attractive tone without studio enhancements. Highly recommended. © TiVo