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Pop - Released May 17, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles Rock and Folk - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Dance - Released March 7, 2001 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electronic - Released January 16, 1997 | Parlophone France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter, the two French twenty-something DJs who make up Daft Punk, are relentless dance music aficionados and historians. And unlike many of their contemporaries, their interests don't just lie in the electronic beats that have been rockin' the clubs since the mid-'80s. The two knob-twiddlers are just as well-versed in Giorgio Moroder's Euro-disco grooves, Chic, and the old-school rhythms of Afrika Bambaataa and the Sugarhill Records catalog as they are in the Chicago house and Detroit techno traditions. When they're not assembling catchy-as-hell bits of electro-pop ("Around the World"), throwing down slabs of minimalist funk ("Da Funk"), or marrying Miami bass to Kraftwerk-ian blips ("Oh Yeah"), Homem-Christo and Bangalter try to impart a little knowledge. On "Teachers," they use a Ween-esque distorted vocal line to name-check a broad list of influences who includes Brian Wilson, Dr. Dre, and Armand Van Helden. Their broad focus, utopian determination, and, of course, their way with a beat earn Daft Punk's Homework a well-deserved 'A'. © TiVo
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Pop - Released April 20, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Pop - Released July 3, 2013 | Columbia

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 7, 2010 | Walt Disney Records

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Made in 3D, Tron: Legacy is the sequel to Tron which was released 28 years earlier and produced by Disney. While The Grid matches the film's very first sequence with the cavernous voice of Jeff Bridges (who appeared in the first film), the other pieces on the record are purely instrumental. Performed by the legendary London Symphony Orchestra, but also with synthesizers, the score of the helmeted French duo Daft Punk is a kind of electro opera that blends darkness and sheer scope. Dancefloor fans will still find something to their taste thanks to Derezzed and End of Line, two tracks that play in the scene set in Castor's nightclub. To mark ten years since the release of this sci-fi film set in the world of video games, Daft Punk have unveiled a collector's version of their soundtrack which comes embellished with nine unreleased tracks, including Castor and Reflections. Finally, it's worth recalling that the famous duo make a brief appearance in the film as nightclub DJs. ©Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Dance - Released March 14, 2005 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Electronic - Released January 1, 2011 | Walt Disney Records

While Daft Punk’s moody, electro-symphonic score to Tron: Legacy captured its ambition perfectly -- and, arguably, may have been the best thing about the movie -- it didn’t quite satisfy fans looking for dancefloor movers. Tron: Legacy Reconfigured rectifies that by letting the French duo’s peers loose on the film’s music. With a varied group of artists ranging from established names (Moby, the Crystal Method, Paul Oakenfold) to up-and-comers (Com Truise, Pretty Lights), the collection offers eclectic tangents on the retro-futuristic musical world Daft Punk created. While the acts involved don’t offer many surprises, they do what they do well, with the Teddybears giving “Adagio for Tron” a playful pulse and the Crystal Method injecting “The Grid” with adrenalized beats. Oakenfold’s reworking of “C.L.U.” is just as easily identifiable as his work as it is Daft Punk's in its massive atmospheres and rhythms; likewise, Boys Noize and Photek turn in versions of “End of Line” that are distinctive and cohesive at the same time. Even though the energy in remixes like Japanese Popstars' percussive take on “Arena” and AVICII's fizzy remix of “Derezzed” is welcome, some of Tron: Legacy Reconfigured's best moments aren’t danceable. Moby brings a patient grace to “The Son of Flynn,” and M83 and Big Black Delta's collaboration on “Fall” uncovers the track’s dreamy romance. Reconfigured may not be as striking as the original Tron: Legacy score, but it is an enjoyable, more accessible extension of it. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 31, 2006 | Parlophone France

Daft Punk titled their hits compilation with an indicator (Vol. 1) that more would be forthcoming, and it's easy to believe that in a dozen years, another dozen singles could be collected with no drop in quality. Unlike their contemporaries coming of age during the rise of electronica, Messrs. Bangalter and de Homem-Christo structured their tracks with drop-dead hooks, peerless beats that were perfect for the dancefloor or the living room, and an innovative production sense. Although Musique, Vol. 1: 1993-2005 won't be necessary for longtime fans, it boasts a few inclusions that should lure in even those who have each of the first three albums. The first reason is its opener, "Musique," actually a B-side (of debut single "Da Funk") whose basement sonics and filter-disco vocal treatment made it the best side of Daft Punk's best single. The second excellent tactic is including three of Daft Punk's greatest remixes, including the electro-shocked "Mothership Reconnection" (originally by Scott Grooves) and "Chord Memory" (originally by Ian Pooley). During their first dozen years, virtually all of Daft Punk's best productions were singles (the only exception being "Face to Face" from Discovery), and Musique is the best example why the duo was tops in electronica from the late '90s to the turn of the millennium. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released December 1, 2003 | Parlophone France

Although not rising to the level of either of their previous production albums or their live record, Daft Punk's version of a remix album is far better than most of its ilk. But first off, agreeing to remix Daft Punk counts as an act of high hubris for most producers; the duo is responsible for some of the most innovative productions ("Musique," "Revolution 909," "Aerodynamic") and remixes ("Mothership Reconnection," "Disco Cubism," "Chord Memory") of recent years. But fresh blood is always intriguing, and the acts hired out to post-produce for 2001's Discovery LP were widely varied and highly talented. Basement Jaxx's version of "Phoenix" (the only track originally taken from Daft Punk's debut album) is a mostly successful translation of DP-style robot disco into Basement Jaxx's vision of sensual house. And although few of the other big names tapped turn in tracks that meet or exceed expectations, the gaps are filled in nicely by lesser-known French upstarts like Jess & Crabbe and Cosmo Vitelli as well as mainstream house mastermind Boris Dlugosch, whose "Digital Love" wisely changes very little of the original. © John Bush /TiVo
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Dance - Released November 14, 2003 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released November 1, 2007 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released April 11, 1997 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released March 20, 2005 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

Booklet
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 7, 2010 | Walt Disney Records

Made in 3D, Tron: Legacy is the sequel to Tron which was released 28 years earlier and produced by Disney. While The Grid matches the film's very first sequence with the cavernous voice of Jeff Bridges (who appeared in the first film), the other pieces on the record are purely instrumental. Performed by the legendary London Symphony Orchestra, but also with synthesizers, the score of the helmeted French duo Daft Punk is a kind of electro opera that blends darkness and sheer scope. Dancefloor fans will still find something to their taste thanks to Derezzed and End of Line, two tracks that play in the scene set in Castor's nightclub. To mark ten years since the release of this sci-fi film set in the world of video games, Daft Punk have unveiled a collector's version of their soundtrack which comes embellished with nine unreleased tracks, including Castor and Reflections. Finally, it's worth recalling that the famous duo make a brief appearance in the film as nightclub DJs. ©Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Dance - Released October 19, 2001 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released December 8, 2000 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released April 21, 2006 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released January 1, 2002 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Dance - Released January 21, 2005 | Daft Life Ltd. - ADA France

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Daft Punk in the magazine
  • Daft Punk, No Future
    Daft Punk, No Future Their last studio album was released in 2013 and many were waiting for their comeback. But Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo decided otherwise, putting an unexpected end to the Daft ...
  • Parcels: Five Man Explosion
    Parcels: Five Man Explosion An interview with Daft Punk’s Australian protégés following the release of their first album which blends seventies Pop, Funk and soft Rock.