Similar artists

Albums

£11.99
£7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2018 | Marathon Artists

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
Courtney Barnett’s second studio album is as magnificent as it is simple. But not simplistic, no, just simple. The young Australian creates a rock’n’roll of an almost disarming purity and clarity. For the simple reason that the songs presented here are absolutely brilliant. Indeed, songs. That “detail” that can make or break an album… Just like the compilation of her first two EPs ( A Sea of Split Peas), her first album (Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit), and her duo album with Kurt Vile (Lotta Sea Lice), this Tell Me How You Really Feel strings together ten trips that perfectly blend cynical humour and sincere confession. Most importantly, Courtney Barnett appears more introspective than in years past. And because things are firing on all cylinders for her, both in her career (with an impressive critical and popular success on the global stage) and personal life (she’s been sharing her life with her peer Jen Cloher for quite a long time now), it becomes clear that the Australian artist took her time to polish perfectly each of these ten compositions. Even more impressive as she combines well-worn themes (her loves, anxieties, frustrations and opinions) while never sounding cliché. As per usual, Courtney Barnett wraps her prose in an impeccable indie rock on the guitar, that never feels overproduced. She’s been influenced by big names such as Lou Reed, Kurt Cobain, Neil Young and Jonathan Richman, including a collaboration on two tracks with the Deal sisters, Kim and Kelley, from The Breeders. What was Neil Young saying again on his famous Hey Hey, My My? Rock’n’roll can never die? © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Download not available
A convincing argument that rock & roll doesn't need reinvention in order to revive itself, Courtney Barnett's full-length debut Sometimes I Sit and Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit. falls into a long, storied rock tradition but never feels beholden to it. By almost any measure, Barnett is a traditionalist -- a singer/songwriter supported by a guitar-bass-drum trio, cranking out ballads and squalls of noise. Certainly, those flurries of six-string fury do recall a variety of indie rock from the '90s, an era when there was a surplus of guitar-friendly singer/songwriters, and if Sometimes I Sit does occasionally seem reminiscent of Liz Phair's landmark Exile in Guyville, it also seems to go back even further, sometimes suggesting the twitchy nerves of the former pub rockers who cranked up the volume and sharpened their invective in the wake of punk. So, Barnett might be part of a long line of underground rock troubadours but, as always, what matters is her specificity. Barnett's thick Australian accent carries an unstated pride for her homeland, but her sly twists of phrase, alternately wry and melancholic, give a greater sense of place, time, and character. Offhand observations mingle with understated insights, a nice trick of songwriting that the music cannily mirrors. When called upon, Barnett and her band can be furious -- "An Illustration of Loneliness" and "Kim's Caravan" both work themselves up to a knotty, gnarled head -- but they can also slip into a soothing sadness ("Depreston," "Boxing Day Blues"). Usually, they're punchy but not precise, hammering the hard hooks of "Aqua Profunda!" and "Nobody Really Cares If You Don't Go to the Party" into place, giving "Elevator Operator" and "Pedestrian at Best" an urgency that mimics Barnett's cloistered, clever words. There are no frills here but there is a distinct, compelling voice evident in Barnett's songs and music alike. That's what makes Sometimes I Sit and Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit. so invigorating: it may have roots -- perhaps even some inadvertent ones -- but it's music that lives thoroughly in the moment. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 6, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
£7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 15, 2013 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2018 | Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released April 19, 2018 | Marathon Artists

£4.79

Alternative & Indie - Released November 6, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released March 15, 2018 | Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released May 11, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2013 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released May 10, 2018 | Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released May 16, 2017 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released January 30, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released August 7, 2015 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2013 | House Anxiety - Marathon Artists

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released May 7, 2017 | Marathon Artists

Artist

Courtney Barnett in the magazine
  • Kurt and Courtney
    Kurt and Courtney Stars of the underground Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile record together…
  • The Qobuz Minute #33
    The Qobuz Minute #33 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...