Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1974 | Vertigo Berlin

An unexpected jump from the extended kosmische jams of Cluster 71 into uncharted territory that signaled their direction for years to come, Zuckerzeit presented a vision of electronic pop, fusing the duo's haunted melodic sense with crisp, scratchy drum programs that provided a grounded focus to all those synthesizer warbles. Oddly, the ten short tracks have separate composer credits (five each), leading to the assumption that Roedelius handled more evocative synthesizer lines ("Hollywood," "Rosa") while Moebius pushed the group into experimental ground ("Rote Riki," "Caramba"). It's undoubtedly one of the most distinctive records in the Cluster discography, though the simple lack of space rock material makes it a difficult album to recommend from the outset. © John Bush /TiVo
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99
Qua

Progressive Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Nepenthe Music & Publishing

Hans-Joachim Roedelius and Dieter Moebius played a pioneering role in the evolution of contemporary electronica, first as Kluster (with Conrad Schnitzler) and subsequently as the duo Cluster. Between Klopfzeichen (1970) and Sowiesoso (1976), via the Harmonia collaboration with Michael Rother, their work offered blueprints to later artists exploring electronic music's myriad possibilities. On Cluster's first studio release in 15 years, Roedelius and Moebius send 17 sound postcards from an exotic retro-futurist world. Although that aesthetic might seem outdated, paradoxically, it never goes out of fashion. The clunky, whimsical, space-age future envisioned from the '50s onwards didn't actually become a reality, so it remains charmingly abstract and elusive -- much like Qua's impenetrable track titles themselves, which appear to be in a language spoken by androids. Mixing minute-long fragments and more expansive pieces, Qua conjures imaginary cinematic sequences in both spartan monochrome and rich Technicolor, spanning diverse moods: from the austere, droning "Xanesra" and the somber, hymnal "Flutful" to the playful "Albtrec Com" and "So Ney," which could be, respectively, cocktail jazz and calypso reverse-engineered by aliens. While this material generally loops and drifts, in places its rhythmic elements also establish a stronger structuring core and a more purposeful sense of linear momentum -- on "Malturi Sa" and "Na Ernel," for instance, tracks recalling the minimalist, beat-driven sensibility of 1974's Zuckerzeit. Roedelius and Moebius have always delighted in the studio as an instrument in itself, and they happily incorporate the accidents that environment and its tools throw up. The looped creaking of a door on "Putoil" typifies this, also underscoring a playful tension between the soundscape's fanciful futuristic world and the earthbound here and now. Notwithstanding Cluster's enormous influence on modern electronic music, it doesn't automatically follow that, in 2009 (with the pair's combined ages totaling 140), they might still have anything relevant or credible to contribute. Qua proves that they do. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1972 | Vertigo Berlin

Cluster's second album finds them still in their Berlin phase, that of the amorphous analog electronic passages without the reference points of any actual rhythms. The tracks move along based on circular synth sequences that provide structure without the addition of overt tangible beats, such as what they would explore on subsequent albums after moving to the German countryside and collaborating with Michael Rother from Neu!, who would also join them in Harmonia and provide his trademark motorik rhythms for both bands. "Plas" starts out like churning machinery, then lifts off dramatically into expansiveness, evoking the scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey where the astronauts circle the moon in slow rotation to slowly reveal the sun in an ominous deep space daybreak; its analog shimmerings and pulsations are the obvious precursors to the ambient passages in Orb and Aphex Twin songs before the depth-charge bass and breakbeats drop in. "Imsüden" is monotonously repetitive, with a woozy spy flick guitar figure inducing vertigo over a swelling and ebbing synth motif and panning helicopter sound effects for over 12 minutes. The aptly named "Für die Katz'" is a brief playful interlude that is the aural equivalent of making a cat jump and chase after a laser pointer. The 15-minute centerpiece "Live in der Fabrik" comes closest to the UFOs-piloted-by-aliens-on-acid themes of their contemporaries Tangerine Dream, and manages to be space rock without the rock. Whether seen as frustratingly nebulous or trance-inducingly hypnotic, Cluster are nevertheless one of Krautrock's true electronic pioneers, and this is headphone candy at its finest. © Brian Way /TiVo
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99
Qua

Germany - Released November 17, 2017 | Bureau B

Hans-Joachim Roedelius and Dieter Moebius played a pioneering role in the evolution of contemporary electronica, first as Kluster (with Conrad Schnitzler) and subsequently as the duo Cluster. Between Klopfzeichen (1970) and Sowiesoso (1976), via the Harmonia collaboration with Michael Rother, their work offered blueprints to later artists exploring electronic music's myriad possibilities. On Cluster's first studio release in 15 years, Roedelius and Moebius send 17 sound postcards from an exotic retro-futurist world. Although that aesthetic might seem outdated, paradoxically, it never goes out of fashion. The clunky, whimsical, space-age future envisioned from the '50s onwards didn't actually become a reality, so it remains charmingly abstract and elusive -- much like Qua's impenetrable track titles themselves, which appear to be in a language spoken by androids. Mixing minute-long fragments and more expansive pieces, Qua conjures imaginary cinematic sequences in both spartan monochrome and rich Technicolor, spanning diverse moods: from the austere, droning "Xanesra" and the somber, hymnal "Flutful" to the playful "Albtrec Com" and "So Ney," which could be, respectively, cocktail jazz and calypso reverse-engineered by aliens. While this material generally loops and drifts, in places its rhythmic elements also establish a stronger structuring core and a more purposeful sense of linear momentum -- on "Malturi Sa" and "Na Ernel," for instance, tracks recalling the minimalist, beat-driven sensibility of 1974's Zuckerzeit. Roedelius and Moebius have always delighted in the studio as an instrument in itself, and they happily incorporate the accidents that environment and its tools throw up. The looped creaking of a door on "Putoil" typifies this, also underscoring a playful tension between the soundscape's fanciful futuristic world and the earthbound here and now. Notwithstanding Cluster's enormous influence on modern electronic music, it doesn't automatically follow that, in 2009 (with the pair's combined ages totaling 140), they might still have anything relevant or credible to contribute. Qua proves that they do. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

Cluster's tenth album, not counting their collaborations with Brian Eno or Neu's Michael Rother, finds the duo of Dieter Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius in a somewhat peculiar place. Their landmark early electronic work was hugely influential on the English post-punk synthesizer bands of the late '70s. Curiosum, released in 1981, just as some of these bands were moving from arty cult status to mainstream stardom, sounds like Moebius and Roedelius had started taking cues from the groups they'd initially inspired. Gone are the side-long experiments of early Cluster albums like Zwei Osteri. In their place, Moebius and Roedelius craft seven surprisingly short discrete instrumental pieces; four are under five minutes, and none reach the ten-minute mark. Since it's impossible to work up a good hypnotic drone in so little time, the songs on Curiosum are more melodic than most of the duo's earlier work. The lilting, almost playful "Oh Odessa" sounds like it could have been on an early Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark album. Other tracks, particularly the fascinating "Charlic," which is based on a wheezy, wobbly rhythm track that sounds not unlike either certain types of Moroccan bagpipes or the bleating of an asthmatic goat, recall the less sonically aggressive moments of Throbbing Gristle or Cabaret Voltaire. Only the relatively lengthy pieces at the end of each side recall Cluster's trademark space rock textures, with the lulling, almost subliminally quiet "Ufer" being the most typically Cluster-like track on the whole album. Curiosum isn't a misguided bid for pop stardom, the way that late-period Amon Düül II or Kraftwerk records often seemed to be. In fact, with its concise and melodic instrumentals, this would probably be an excellent introduction to synthesizer-based Krautrock for pop listeners put off by the idea of 20-minute one-chord drones. However, it's an atypical work, and it's not surprising that Cluster took a decade-long sabbatical after its release. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£9.59

Pop - Released March 24, 2014 | Videoradio

CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99
USA

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99

Germany - Released November 17, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£8.99

Germany - Released May 19, 2017 | Bureau B

Originally surfacing as part of 1971-1981, the mammoth nine-disc box set anthologizing the first decade of influential German duo Cluster, Konzerte 1972/1977 was given a stand-alone release in 2017. The first half of the recording is a rare document of the duo's early performances at Hamburg venue Fabrik, recorded during the same year as Cluster II, which also included an excerpt from a concert at the same venue. Dieter Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius would reportedly perform for six hours at a time, so it seems like a 20-minute excerpt would barely scratch the surface, but it does a fantastic job of presenting the fearless explorers working in their element. As with their earliest albums, this is a deep space odyssey that sounds entirely removed from the conventions of rock music, yet it's too aggressive and distorted to be dubbed ambient music (a term that hadn't even been coined yet). Near the beginning, there are factory-like distorted repetitions and jarring high-pitched oscillations, predicting so much of the industrial and techno that would surface during the coming decades. It only proceeds to become harsher and more hallucinatory. Even when it gets quieter, and at some points almost deathly still, it doesn't come close to sounding relaxing. The second half of this release moves ahead in time to 1977, after Cluster had released more accessible (but still visionary) albums like Zuckerzeit and Sowiesoso, and were collaborating with musicians such as Brian Eno, Can's Holger Czukay, and Asmus Tietchens. Recorded at the Festival International de la Science-Fiction in Metz, the set is closer to the earlier performance than the pretty melodies and clean sound of the albums they had been producing around that time. There's much more of a warm drone to this set, but the recording quality is grainy rather than polished, and it becomes darker and more ominous during the second half. Roedelius' hypnotic piano triplets surface, but it doesn't seem like it's getting brighter, even if it's a bit softer. Both sets are stunning, and while this might not be the best place to start with Cluster, it's a must-listen for anyone interested in their more abstract side. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
CD£0.99

Latin America - Released December 25, 2018 | Cluster

CD£7.49

Rap - Released January 25, 2012 | CLUSTER RABEL

CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

Moebius and Roedelius, the Austrian composers who have performed as Cluster for three decades now, have collaborated with fellow ambient pioneers like Brian Eno and Holger Czukay numerous times over the years. So it comes as little surprise that their expressionistic style shares more in common with neo-classicalists like Phillip Glass than today's more techno-influenced ambient artists. One Hour, the duo's fourteenth album, is exactly that-- one hour of songs culled from four hours of continuous improvisation. At times the experimental music flows like some bizarre soundtrack for a David Lynch-influenced student film. At others, it sounds like classical music even your Grandma could dig (er... well, maybe not). Although the duo's wildly eclectic, esoteric sound may take some getting used to, One Hour is one of those sneaky discs that continues to grow on you with each listen. © Bret Love /TiVo
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released January 1, 2017 | Bureau B

CD£1.39

House - Released January 1, 2005 | Nustar