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Violin Solos - Released September 8, 2017 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - Special Soundchecks - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Of course, since years Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin have been recorded over and over again, including by world’s best and most prestigious solists. But when violinist Christian Tetzlaff releases a brand new recording, we can only say: “Friends, countrymen, lend Qobuz your ears”. Concerts with Christian Tetzlaff often become an existential experience for interpreter and audience alike; old familiar works suddenly appear in an entirely new light, also – of course – within the frame of a new studio recording such as this one. Essential to Tetzlaff’s approach are the courage to take risks, technical brilliance, openness and alertness to life. Such an interpretation becomes a real challenge for the aficionado and guarantees a brilliant musical adventure.
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Violin Concertos - Released April 13, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Special Soundchecks - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
Today, Finland is one of the richest musical countries on Earth. Thanks to the exceptional quality of its musical teaching it produces numerous composers, conductors and artists who perform all over the world. The very rich catalogue of the dynamic Finnish publisher Ondine contains several recordings of the German violinist Christian Tetzlaff (Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin) by Bach, Mozart's sonatas, Trios by Brahms, concertos by Mendelssohn, Schumann and Shostakovich); and the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu (Sibelius, Mahler, Enescu, Berio, Messiaen, Lindberg, Melartin), but it is their first record together. Bartók's two Violin Concertos were written thirty years apart, for two virtuosos. While the Second Concerto in the form of variations on a theme that develop ingeniously across three movements, has been well-known for a long time, the first remained unheard for years. Written as a declaration of love for the Hungarian-Swiss violinist Stefi Geyer, for whom Bartók had fallen, it was a secret kept by the dedicatee: it was only long after the composer's death that the violinist let Bartók's patron and close friend, the conductor Paul Sacher, know about the work. He would see that it was performed, with Hansheinz Schneeberger, but only in 1958. Bartók's two concertos, essential parts of the repertoire for violin and orchestra would enjoy a well-deserved resurgence in interest among a younger generation of violinists – the recording of the same works by Renaud Capuçon for Warner came out a few weeks ago. This new version, magnificently recorded, carefully explores all the orchestral richness, in perfect dialogue with Christian Tetzlaff's outstanding violin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 12, 2016 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released October 2, 2012 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Chamber Music - Released September 24, 2013 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
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Chamber Music - Released March 31, 2009 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released June 24, 2016 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released March 11, 2016 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released November 1, 2011 | Ondine

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Violinist Christian Tetzlaff moved to Finland's Ondine label with this 2011 release, perhaps reflecting the thinking of his new employer with the program. It combines the most standard of standard works, the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64, with two fairly unusual works by Schumann, the Fantasy for violin & orchestra, Op. 131, and the still rarer Violin Concerto in D minor, WoO 1. Both works were negatively impacted by the spreading word of Schumann's descent into madness, and the concerto was completely suppressed by his successors. It was revived, ironically enough, in Germany in the 1930s after Nazi authorities banned the concerto by Jewish-born Mendelssohn. Thus, there is a kind of double linkage among the works on the album: the historical one, and the one that stems from the gradual rediscovery of Schumann's works of the 1850s: the way to appreciate them is to listen for the ways in which they avoid sounding like Mendelssohn, or even like earlier Schumann. The concerto's outer movements lack a memorable theme but are formally dense, even experimental. This fits the rather cerebral approach of Tetzlaff, who takes his time in both the concerto and the Fantasy and brings out many small details. The real find here, however, may be the Mendelssohn, which Tetzlaff manages to make very affecting without layering on the vibrato as in the standard approach. Instead he lets phrasing carry the load, and one feels in the end that he has stripped away a layer that generations of Russian violin tuition have brought to the work. He is aided in both cases by condcutor Paavo Järvi, who keeps the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra firmly in the background where it belongs here. A lively recording from Tetzlaff that will reward repeated hearings.
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Classical - Released September 2, 2014 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
As violinist Christian Tetzlaff steadily records the core concerto repertoire, he expands his modern coverage with the pair of concertos by Dmitry Shostakovich, which were originally composed for David Oistrakh. Inevitably, Tetzlaff's interpretations will be compared to the great Russian virtuoso's, whose performances are still held in the highest esteem and are rightly admired for their gravitas, intensity, and emotional depth. However, they are historical recordings that present the concertos in the light of Shostakovich's and Oistrakh's experiences in the Soviet era, and because of this, it is tempting to regard them as landmarks that no one can ever match or surpass. Yet Tetzlaff brings his own energy, concentration, and seriousness to his performances, and he shows a clear respect for the past and a connection to the tradition Oistrakh started. Add to his penetrating insights the exceptionally clear and controlled accompaniment by John Storgårds and the Helsinki Philharmonic, and the marvelous clarity and depth of Ondine's recording, and the excellence of this recording becomes apparent. While it won't displace the older Oistrakh recordings collectors still cherish, this 2014 release will bring a new audience to these challenging works and give weight to Tetzlaff's increasingly important catalog.
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Chamber Music - Released October 5, 2018 | Ondine

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Classical - Released August 10, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released April 2, 2012 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released April 7, 2008 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 30, 1994 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 15, 2002 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released August 1, 2005 | Warner Classics

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