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Diction - Released January 1, 2007 | Sparrow

Yowsa! The Charlie Daniels faithful will no doubt revel in this double-disc gospel collection, which slaps together one disc of traditional material -- "Abide with Me," "The Old Rugged Cross," and, of course, "Amazing Grace" -- along with nine others of similar stature. The second volume is mostly a mixed bag, containing 11 co-writes and originals, and the track "Two Out of Three" by Ron Griffin. Again, those looking for Uneasy Rider-era Daniels may not find this attractive, but those converts to his later music will no doubt be in hog heaven. ~ Thom Jurek
CD£8.99

Country - Released October 22, 2012 | Blue Hat Records

CD£23.49

Country - Released November 9, 1998 | Epic - Legacy

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Country - Released January 27, 2017 | Legacy Recordings

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Country - Released March 19, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

CD£16.49

Diction - Released January 1, 1996 | Sparrow

Daniels' second gospel set finds him firmly fixed in his comfort zone of country-rock with strong hooks. Whether he's condemning hypocrites on "New Pharisees," acknowledging someone's prayers on the bouncy "Somebody Was Prayin' for Me," or venturing into revival territory on "Jesus," all the songs exude sinuous melodies and catchy hooks. The prettiest song is the bluesy ballad "Heart of My Heart," which Daniels endows with a soulful rhapsody. Steel Witness isn't as coherent and satisfying as his first gospel set, but it's still good. ~ Bil Carpenter
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Country - Released April 23, 1991 | Epic - Nashville

This strong collection of Daniels songs rocks harder than usual, despite showing his soft side on "Little Folks" and "Fathers and Sons." Daniels practically gives a cultural history of the violin on "Talk to Me Fiddle," the album's most unusual song, and continues to extol the virtues of country living ("The Twang Factor") and patriotism ("Let Freedom Ring.") ~ Brian Mansfield
CD£11.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1995 | Capitol Nashville

On Same Ol Me, Charlie Daniels returned to the country and rock hybrid that sent him to the top of the charts in the late '70s and early '80s. As always, the album is a bit inconsistent, featuring too much filler, but the best moments on the record are some of the best music he has recorded in the '90s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released March 19, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

When Charlie Daniels released his eponymous debut in 1970, Southern rock was in its nascent stages. It had been a year since the Allman Brothers Band released their debut and Lynyrd Skynyrd wouldn't unleash its first record for another three years, so the genre was in the process of being born, and Charlie Daniels' debut plays a pivotal role in the genre -- not so much because it was directly influential, but because it points the way to how the genre could and would sound, and how country music could retain its hillbilly spirit and rock like a mother. Where the Allmans were firmly grounded in the blues, especially on the first two records, Daniels was a redneck from the start, and all ten songs on his debut were country at their foundation, even if some of it is country via the Band, as Rich Kienzle points out in his brief liner notes to Koch's 2001 reissue of the album. The Band connections derive from Daniels' time as a session musician for Columbia in Nashville, where he played on many country-rock albums, including Dylan's Nashville Skyline, but there's a heavy dose of hard rock, often via the Allmans' extended jams, on this record. Daniels simply wails on his guitar here, most notably on the six-minute closer "Thirty Nine Miles from Mobile," but, apart from the ballads, he doesn't miss a chance to solo. The heavy guitars give Charlie Daniels a real rock feel, and that vibe is continued through the loose rhythm section and a strong dose of counterculture humor, heard strongest on "The Pope and the Dope." That song also shows signs of Daniels' redneck sensibilities, which also surface in unpredictable ways throughout this wild, woolly album. He makes crude jokes, celebrates the South (particularly his home, "Georgia"), spits out bluesy leads, exaggerates his vocals, croons sweetly, and steals women. He's a redneck rebel, not fitting into either the country or the rock & roll of 1970 with this record, but, in retrospect, he sounds like a visionary, pointing the way to the future when southern rockers saw no dividing lines between rock, country, and blues, and only saw it all as sons of the south. That's what he achieves with Charlie Daniels -- a unique Southern sound that's quintessentially American, sounding at once new and timeless. Once he formed the Charlie Daniels Band, he became a star and with Fire on the Mountain, he had another classic, but he would never sound as wild, unpredictable, or as much like a maverick as he does on this superb album. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released June 30, 2017 | CDC Records

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Country - Released October 22, 2012 | Blue Hat Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Nashville

New label, same tune. ~ Michael McCall
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Country - Released May 9, 2006 | Sony Wonder

This is such a great idea that you have to wonder why nobody thought of it before 1997. Subtitled "Campfire Songs and Cowboy Tunes," this children's album consists of nothing but faithful renditions of traditional folk songs of the old West. The tunes featured here run from the familiar "Git Along, Little Dogies" and "I'm An Old Cowhand from the Rio Grande, to more obscure choices like "Cowboy Logic" and "Saturday Night in Abilene." The folk tunes "Sixteen Tons" and "John Henry" round out this collection, which is brief enough not to bore the youngsters, and well-played enough not to annoy their parents.
CD£11.49

Country - Released September 9, 2000 | Epic - Legacy

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Country - Released May 28, 2010 | Epic - Legacy

CD£17.99

Diction - Released January 1, 2002 | Sparrow

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Diction - Released January 1, 1994 | Sparrow

Charlie Daniels recorded a handful of country gospel albums in the '90s (1997's STEEL WITNESS was nominated for a Grammy). THE DOOR was the first of these albums, less vengeful and apocalyptic than STEEL WITNESS--which features songs like "It's Payback Time"--but similarly no-nonsense in its message, with songs like "Washed in Blood," "Jesus Died For You," "Praying to the Wrong God," and "Lay It on the Line." Daniels' voice, not his fiddle, is dominant here, with backing from the Christ Church Choir. The album closes with the 14-minute suite "The Jerusalem Trilogy," which, one hopes it's not sacrilegious to point out, has five parts.
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Country - Released January 1, 2006 | Sparrow

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Pop/Rock - Released February 27, 1995 | Epic - Nashville