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French Music - Released November 2, 2012 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Pop - Released November 5, 2013 | Columbia

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French Music - Released November 27, 2009 | Columbia

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French Music - Released August 26, 2016 | Columbia

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Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released January 18, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released November 7, 2011 | Columbia

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Pop - Released February 28, 1996 | Columbia

One of the attractions of Céline Dion's sixteenth album (her fourth in English) is that it presents the missing link between the Quebecoise star and David Bowie's Space Oddity. That is, the conductor and arranger Paul Buckmaster, who worked for Bowie, but also for Elton John until 1978. For Céline, he put his signature on the song that gave the album its title: with its elegant strings, its nonchalant Latin rhythm and its torrid saxophone solo, Falling Into You lends a certain seductive suavity to the singer's image. As the cover of this release attests, Céline Dion was then a young woman (28 years old in 1996) who was no longer afraid to please: a natural "girl next door" (You make me feel like a natural woman), whose aura is enveloped by a positive light (Your light).In addition to Buckmaster, we will meet Jean-Jacques Goldman, another prominent behind-the-scenes man (If That's What It Takes, I Love You...). The Dion / Goldman duo had just released the world's best-selling francophone record (D'eux, 1995). Anecdotally, a third star of the studios could have been one of the pillars of Falling Into You, as Phil Spector had started to produce it, before his mood swings led René Angélil (manager and husband of Céline) to put a stop to the collaboration. Only the song River Deep, Mountain High, written by Spector, is a remnant of this fleeting encounter. Finally, a year before Titanic and the global hit My Heart Will Go On, Céline Dion is here doing her classes in the cinema with Because You Loved Me, a piece written by the "queen of the ballad" Diane Warren, for the feature film Up Close & Personal. The film depicted the meteoric rise of a TV journalist, played by Michelle Pfeiffer. It's hard not to draw a parallel with Céline Dion's in the 1990s (Falling Into You was one of the best-selling albums in history with 32 million copies sold worldwide). ©Nicolas Magenham / Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released October 4, 2005 | Epic

No doubt a companion piece to 1999's All the Way: A Decade of Song, On Ne Change Pas is a two-disc compendium of the other, mildly overlooked phase of Celine Dion's career: her performances sung entirely in her native tongue of Québecois French. While she soared up charts all over the globe with her hits sung in English, she also amassed quite a back catalog of hits ranging from dance-pop-friendly numbers to her familiar ground of passionate, melodramatic ballads. For those unfamiliar with this portion of her career (or for those who don't speak French), getting past the roadblock of not being able to understand the subject material will lead to a greater, more holistic appreciation of the depth and prolific output of her career in such a short span. At two discs, it's also a bit much Dion for anyone to swallow in one sitting, but on the plus side there are also a few new tracks, including her duet with Il Divo, "I Believe in You." © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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French Artists - Released March 2, 2006 | Columbia

No doubt a companion piece to 1999's All the Way: A Decade of Song, On Ne Change Pas is a two-disc compendium of the other, mildly overlooked phase of Celine Dion's career: her performances sung entirely in her native tongue of Québecois French. While she soared up charts all over the globe with her hits sung in English, she also amassed quite a back catalog of hits ranging from dance-pop-friendly numbers to her familiar ground of passionate, melodramatic ballads. For those unfamiliar with this portion of her career (or for those who don't speak French), getting past the roadblock of not being able to understand the subject material will lead to a greater, more holistic appreciation of the depth and prolific output of her career in such a short span. At two discs, it's also a bit much Dion for anyone to swallow in one sitting, but on the plus side there are also a few new tracks, including her duet with Il Divo, "I Believe in You." © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 18, 2019 | Columbia

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French Artists - Released August 31, 1998 | Columbia

Celine Dion is nothing if not a canny businesswoman. Even though she was riding high on the success of "My Heart Will Go On," she followed it up by recording S'Il Suffisait d'Aimer (If It Is Enough to Love), her fourth album of French-language pop songs. Musically, it's no different than Let's Talk About Love, yet many new fans won over by that album may be alienated by the French. Nevertheless, her longtime fans will be pleased to hear her return, in a sense, to her roots, especially since the album is about as consistent as any of her albums, both English and French. For hardcore fans, it's certainly worth hearing. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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International Pop - Released November 9, 1993 | Columbia

The Colour of My Love follows the same pattern as Celine Dion's eponymous breakthrough, and while the songs aren't quite as consistent this time around, the record is nevertheless quite successful, thanks to the careful production, professional songwriting (highlighted by "When I Fall in Love," "The Power of Love," and "Think Twice") and Dion's powerhouse performances. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 25, 2002 | Columbia

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Pop - Released October 24, 1997 | Columbia

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Pop - Released November 6, 2020 | Columbia

In the wake of her Titanic success, Celine Dion produced two new albums for the holiday season of 1998. One was a new French album, and the other was These Are Special Times, her first Christmas album. These Are Special Times is an especially successful holiday album since Dion wisely balances popular carols ("The Christmas Song," "Blue Christmas," "Feliz Navidad") with new songs ("Don't Save It All for Christmas," the R. Kelly duet "I'm Your Angel"), hymns ("Ave Maria," "Adeste Fidelis"), and Christmas songs with a distinct religious theme ("O Holy Night," the Andrea Bocelli duet "The Prayer"). At times, the production is too slick, at other times Dion's vocals are a little mannered, but overall, These Are Special Times is very effective, because the songs are good and she's committed to the material. Any fan of Dion, or of '90s adult contemporary pop in general, should find this very enjoyable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Pop - Released November 16, 1999 | Columbia

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There aren't a lot of greatest-hits albums with seven new songs, which is exactly what All the Way: A Decade of Song is. There are just nine hits on this hits collection, and of those, only a handful -- "If You Asked Me To," "Beauty and the Beast," "The Power of Love," "Because You Loved Me," "It's All Coming Back to Me Now," and "My Heart Will Go On" -- were huge hits in the U.S. Her first American hit, "Where Does My Heart Beat Now," isn't here, nor is her duet with Barbra Streisand, "Tell Him." Naturally, this means it's not a definitive collection, but rather an unsatisfying album that feels suspiciously like a piece of product. The best of the hits, like the Meat Loaf-ian epic "It's All Coming Back to Me Now" and "My Heart Will Go On," are certainly among the best adult contemporary songs of the decade, and the new stuff would pale in comparison, even if it was very good -- which, by and large, it is not. Two numbers, the danceable "That's the Way it Is" and the pretty ballad "If Walls Could Talk," work, but the cover of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" falls flat and "All the Way," complete with old vocals from Sinatra, is a disaster. The remaining three aren't bad, but they're not particularly memorable, especially compared to the hits. And that's the problem with All the Way -- if it had been a straight hits collection, with "That's the Way it Is" and "If Walls Could Talk" added to the end, it would have been fine, but padding it with nearly a full album worth of new material hurts it. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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French Artists - Released March 30, 1995 | Columbia

Released in 1995, just as her American success was gaining momentum, The French Album strengthened Celine Dion's ties to her French-Canadian roots. Nearly all of the songs on the album were written by Jean-Jacques Goldman, whose songcraft is remarkably similar to the adult contemporary pop that broadened her international success. That's not necessarily bad; it's just that listeners expecting something strange or exotic may be surprised by the fact that the only thing that's changed is the language. That said, The French Album is a well-constructed and entertaining adult pop record -- there may not be too many distinctive songs, but on the whole, it sounds quite nice. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 16, 2014 | Columbia

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French Music - Released November 11, 2003 | Epic

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Céline Dion in the magazine