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Rock - Released February 7, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Only a year after the release of the first Roxy Music album, Bryan Ferry also put out his first record. A frenzy of material which allowed the British dandy to satisfy his passion for performance, plain and simple. On These Foolish Things (1973), the leader of Roxy Music covers Dylan, The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, The Four Tops and Elvis, whereas Another Time, Another Place (1974) sees him revisiting Dylan but also Sam Cooke, Ike Turner, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, Joe South and a few gems from some 60s girl groups. Unpublished until now, this live recording from the Royal Albert Hall in London in December 1974 is essentially made up of these two solo albums. Irony, mismatch and the exuberance of the glam philosophy shine out during every second of this grandiose and bombastic concert which sees three members of Roxy Music join him on stage: the guitarist Phil Manzanera (insane!), drummer Paul Thompson and bassist John Porter. With a smoking jacket, flares, and long hair, Bryan Ferry delivers a performance as decadent as they come, kicking tradition to the kerb. Champagne, bubble bath and rock’n’roll! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 26, 2012 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Over the last 40 years, singer Bryan Ferry has established himself not only as the frontman of one of rock's most iconic bands, but also as a unique interpreter covering the songs of others. The songwriters he's covered have been transformed into something wholly other by him. Ferry's ability to find and reveal what is hidden in a lyric, a musical phrase, or even a key signature is uncanny. The Jazz Age finds Ferry covering himself in radical fashion: he doesn't sing. He is credited as co-producer (with Rhett Davies) and "director." The Jazz Age celebrates Ferry's 40th anniversary in music by re-recording some of his classic tunes -- from the 1972 Roxy Music album to 2010's Olympia -- inspired by the sounds of '20s jazz. Ferry's looked deeply into the past before -- 1999's As Time Goes By paid tribute to the music of the '30s, an album of sung standards from the era -- but not his own. This set was performed by many of the same British jazz musicians who performed on that record under the musical direction of Colin Good. Musically, Ferry and these musicians drew on the influences of Louis Armstrong's Hot Sevens, Duke Ellington's Orchestra, Bix Beiderbecke's Wolverines, and the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. But they also found inspiration in the heady historical era before 1929 detailed so intensely in the novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Michael Arlen, and Ernest Hemingway. All 13 of these tunes have been wildly revamped and offer interesting textures: a bass clarinet and baritone saxophone are used instead of a double bass to carry the bottom end, but the music here is played so well, it doesn't feel gimmicky. All of the original melodies have been left intact, though tempos are often completely reset. The sprightly "Do the Strand" features piano, brass, reeds, banjo, and drums all competing for dominance (they were recorded live in the studio), and swings hard. "Love Is the Drug" is played as a moaning, bluesy dirge, while "Avalon" retains its sense of melancholy even as clarinets, trumpets, and piano commingle in a midtempo dialogue on different aspects of the melody. "Virginia Plain" is a fingerpopping dancefloor jaunt that recalls flappers doing the Lindy Hop. Given that Ferry doesn't sing on The Jazz Age, the appeal for casual fans is debatable. But for the faithful, trad-jazz heads, and open-minded listeners, the musical quality -- from expert arrangements, virtuosic playing, and the brilliant concept -- offer something wholly different and rewarding. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 17, 2014 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

On the album art of Avonmore, the record he released when he was a year shy of 70, Bryan Ferry showcases himself as a dashing young man -- a portrait of an artist not as a glam trailblazer or distinguished elder statesman, but rather caught in an indeterminate time between the gorgeous heartbreak of Roxy Music's Avalon and the meticulous solo work that came immediately in its wake. This is Ferry's prime, a moment when his legacy was intact but yet to be preserved in amber. Avonmore consciously evokes this distinct period, sometimes sighing into the exquisite ennui of Avalon but usually favoring the fine tailoring of Boys & Girls, a record where every sequenced rhythm, keyboard, and guitar line blended into an alluring urbane pulse. Ferry isn't so much racing to revive a younger edition of himself as much as laying claim to this particular strand of sophisticated pop, one that happens to feel a shade richer now when it's delivered by an artist whose world-weariness has settled into his marrow but is yet to sadden him. This much is apparent on Avonmore's closing covers, an oddly appropriate pairing of Stephen Sondheim's "Send in the Clowns" and Robert Palmer's "Johnny & Mary" that are both given gently meditative electronic makeovers, but much of the record explores the other end of the Ferry spectrum, where he's making music to dance away the heartache. He's no longer on the floor himself, preferring to watch with a bit of a bemusement, but this reserved romanticism suits him perfectly, particularly because Ferry and his co-producer Rhett Davies -- a steady collaborator since 1999's standards record As Time Goes By -- place an emphasis on mood but not at the expense of the songs. Naturally, what is first alluring about Avonmore is its feel -- it's meant to be seductive -- but the songs are what makes this record something more than a fling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 18, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released February 7, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Bryan Ferry had released two solo albums when he took the stage at London's Royal Albert Hall in December 1974. Both of them, 1973's These Foolish Things and 1974's Another Time, Another Place, had found him transferring the swaggering, arty glitter-rock of his band Roxy Music into a series of well-curated covers from the 1930s through the 1960s. It was an iconoclastic move, comparable to David Bowie's Pin Ups, but adorned with Ferry's own dashing pop élan and smooth theatricality. As an interpreter of standards, American Popular or otherwise, Ferry had impossibly combined the hazy sheen of golden-era Hollywood glamour with a wry singer/songwriter sincerity and a wallop of good-time rock & roll. He brought all of this jazzy charisma to bear on this live concert date, offering a cross section of songs from these two solo productions. Joining him were several Roxy Music regulars, including guitarists Phil Manzanera and John Porter, drummer Paul Thompson, and Roxy Music-adjacent pianist/violinist Eddie Jobson, who also supplied string arrangements. Also on board was King Crimson bassist and future Asia vocalist John Wetton. Rounding out Ferry's stage group were a sundry mix of horn and string players, keyboardists, and a trio of female backing vocalists. The result is a vibrantly dynamic live sound that straddles the line between Rocky Horror Picture Show and Elvis: As Recorded at Madison Square Garden. Here, Ferry offers singularly inspired takes on Lesley Gore's "It's My Party," Smokey Robinson's "The Tracks of My Tears," Ike & Tina Turner's "Fingerpoppin'," and a raging, goose bump-inducing reading of Bob Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall." Also redolent is Ferry's love of jazz standards, represented here with his rousing take on "These Foolish Things," one that would come into even brighter focus in years to come on albums like 2012's The Jazz Age and 2018's Bitter-Sweet. One of the key delights in Ferry's work in the standards arena is the way he makes song lyrics take on new and unexpected meaning. Hearing him intone the iconic opening line from the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil" -- "Please allow me to introduce myself, I'm a man of wealth and taste" -- is to witness Ferry both cheekily underlining his public persona with Roxy Music and recontextualizing his aesthetic as a tuxedo-wearing matinee rock idol in his own right. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 18, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Bryan Ferry in the magazine
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