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Country - Released August 4, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

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One of the appealing things about Brett Eldredge -- maybe his chief attribute, really -- is his easy touch. Eldredge never pushes a lyric or melody, a signature that nicely melds with the cool soul undercurrents that run throughout his music. This attitude and sound gelled on Illinois, the 2015 sophomore set that produced the chart-topping hits "Lose My Mind" and "Wanna Be That Song," but Eldredge refines it further on this eponymous 2017 album. If anything, Brett Eldredge showcases the singer's softer side more than its predecessors. Sure, there are moments where tracks get overloaded and oversaturated with guitars, beats, and more -- "Love Someone" opens with an avalanche of rhythm that settles into a singalong chorus; the hooks on "Superhero" are punctuated with electronic whoops and churning six-strings; the first single "Somethin' I'm Good At" rattles with a big, stomping beat and a stilted rap -- but Brett Eldredge's heart resides in the quieter moments. A lot of this gentler material is of the romantic persuasion, but what lends the album depth is how he'll take a detour to pen a mash note to his brother, a song that earns its sentiment through telling details. His love songs may not be quite as incisive, but they're well-crafted, from their melodies to their sumptuous productions, which borrow as much from soft rock as they do from modern R&B or country. Such fusions sound as appealing on the sunny pop tunes as they do on the ballads, and that is why Brett Eldredge succeeds: It's a smooth, easygoing good time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 26, 2018 | Atlantic Records

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Abandoning all modern trappings, Brett Eldredge chooses to go the full Frank Sinatra on his 2016 seasonal affair Glow. Leaving behind the R&B rhythms that underpin his hit singles is a bit of a risky move for Eldredge, as it pushes the spotlight directly onto his vocals. Eldredge may not take many risks on Glow -- he's determined to adhere to string-saturated tradition, so he never plays with his phrasing -- but he's warm and charming, which gives him enough swagger to ride the snazzy big-band arrangements on Glow. Often, these tunes -- everything is familiar apart from the newly written title track, which is designed to pass without notice among the standards -- are so overheated they suggest a Vegas revue, but that's also the appeal of Glow. Eldredge plays with the schlockiest aspects of show biz, but his tongue is never in his cheek: he believes in this bluster, and that's the fun of Glow. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 26, 2018 | Atlantic Records

Abandoning all modern trappings, Brett Eldredge chooses to go the full Frank Sinatra on his 2016 seasonal affair Glow. Leaving behind the R&B rhythms that underpin his hit singles is a bit of a risky move for Eldredge, as it pushes the spotlight directly onto his vocals. Eldredge may not take many risks on Glow -- he's determined to adhere to string-saturated tradition, so he never plays with his phrasing -- but he's warm and charming, which gives him enough swagger to ride the snazzy big-band arrangements on Glow. Often, these tunes -- everything is familiar apart from the newly written title track, which is designed to pass without notice among the standards -- are so overheated they suggest a Vegas revue, but that's also the appeal of Glow. Eldredge plays with the schlockiest aspects of show biz, but his tongue is never in his cheek: he believes in this bluster, and that's the fun of Glow. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 11, 2015 | Atlantic Nashville

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Brett Eldredge supported his 2013 debut Bring You Back by opening for Darius Rucker, a connection that underscored the similarities between Brett's hit "Mean to Me" and the former Hootie & the Blowfish frontman, but the singer's 2015 sophomore set Illinois bears the influence of another contemporary country hitmaker. By the time the album gets to the bespangled disco of "You Can't Stop Me," a duet with Thomas Rhett that arrives just two tracks into the record, it's clear Eldredge has spent time with Sam Hunt's smash Montevallo, an album that sees no barrier between modern R&B and country. It's not the only moment on Illinois that follows this fusion, either: the first single, "Lose My Mind," surreptitiously quotes Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy," a showy move that slightly disguises how Eldredge does possess nicely weathered, soulful chops. He doesn't always rely on this skill, but when he does, the record leaps to life: it gives the corny come-ons of "Fire" a kick, it pushes the hammering paranoia of "Shadow" into overdrive, makes the lite funk of "Time Well Spent" seem nimble, and lends the lazy shuffle "Going Away for Awhile" good cheer. Such soulfulness and sly stylistic diversity were largely absent on Bring You Back, a quite pleasing set of by-the-books radio country, and it certainly enlivens Illinois, but not at the expense of strong songs. Eldredge -- who bears writing credits on every one of the album's 12 songs; his chief collaborator is producer Ross Copperman, who is a co-writer on nine songs -- does have an ear for clever turns of phrase and a knack for sturdy structure, and by blending these fundamentals with fresh flair, he comes up with a very winning and very modern country record in Illinois. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released June 30, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released August 6, 2013 | Atlantic Nashville

Brett Eldredge isn't necessarily Nashville royalty, but as a cousin of Grascal bassist Terry Eldredge, he has a passing familiarity with the Music City. More importantly, when he arrived in Nashville eager to pursue a professional career, he was ready to play the game, receptive to advice, and ready to take his time to assemble a winning debut album. He released his debut single "Raymond" in the fall of 2010, and while it wound up reaching 23 on the Billboard Country charts, it took him almost two full years to deliver Bring You Back, his full-length debut. Such a long delay suggests how seriously Atlantic Nashville took Eldredge's prospects as a star -- after the 2011 single "It Ain't Gotta Be Love" stiffed, the label certainly decided to rejigger the album, as they weren't going to waste this opportunity -- and the resulting Bring You Back is crisp, chipper, and eager to please, an album that cheerfully checks off every box on contemporary country radio. Many of those boxes reside somewhere within the Kenny Chesney universe -- "On and On" cops the breezy charm of "When the Sun Goes Down," while "Go On Without Me" favors Chesney's arena-country side, complete with an unabashed debt to U2 -- but Eldredge has an easy swagger that the perennially reserved Chesney consciously avoids. That doesn't mean Eldredge mimics Jason Aldean's exercises in indulgent machismo -- this is a guy who quite comfortably opened for Taylor Swift and never seemed out of place -- but he has an easy charm that recalls Blake Shelton before he became a television star. Apart from the slight bit of bluesy twang that drives "Tell Me Where to Park," everything on Bring You Back is shiny, happy country-pop -- even the ballads feel bright -- but that's the appeal of Eldredge and his debut: everybody involved worked hard to deliver a piece of gleaming modern country product, and it's hard to resist all that impeccable craft. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 11, 2015 | Atlantic Nashville

Brett Eldredge supported his 2013 debut Bring You Back by opening for Darius Rucker, a connection that underscored the similarities between Brett's hit "Mean to Me" and the former Hootie & the Blowfish frontman, but the singer's 2015 sophomore set Illinois bears the influence of another contemporary country hitmaker. By the time the album gets to the bespangled disco of "You Can't Stop Me," a duet with Thomas Rhett that arrives just two tracks into the record, it's clear Eldredge has spent time with Sam Hunt's smash Montevallo, an album that sees no barrier between modern R&B and country. It's not the only moment on Illinois that follows this fusion, either: the first single, "Lose My Mind," surreptitiously quotes Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy," a showy move that slightly disguises how Eldredge does possess nicely weathered, soulful chops. He doesn't always rely on this skill, but when he does, the record leaps to life: it gives the corny come-ons of "Fire" a kick, it pushes the hammering paranoia of "Shadow" into overdrive, makes the lite funk of "Time Well Spent" seem nimble, and lends the lazy shuffle "Going Away for Awhile" good cheer. Such soulfulness and sly stylistic diversity were largely absent on Bring You Back, a quite pleasing set of by-the-books radio country, and it certainly enlivens Illinois, but not at the expense of strong songs. Eldredge -- who bears writing credits on every one of the album's 12 songs; his chief collaborator is producer Ross Copperman, who is a co-writer on nine songs -- does have an ear for clever turns of phrase and a knack for sturdy structure, and by blending these fundamentals with fresh flair, he comes up with a very winning and very modern country record in Illinois. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2016 | Atlantic Nashville

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 28, 2016 | Atlantic Nashville

Abandoning all modern trappings, Brett Eldredge chooses to go the full Frank Sinatra on his 2016 seasonal affair Glow. Leaving behind the R&B rhythms that underpin his hit singles is a bit of a risky move for Eldredge, as it pushes the spotlight directly onto his vocals. Eldredge may not take many risks on Glow -- he's determined to adhere to string-saturated tradition, so he never plays with his phrasing -- but he's warm and charming, which gives him enough swagger to ride the snazzy big-band arrangements on Glow. Often, these tunes -- everything is familiar apart from the newly written title track, which is designed to pass without notice among the standards -- are so overheated they suggest a Vegas revue, but that's also the appeal of Glow. Eldredge plays with the schlockiest aspects of show biz, but his tongue is never in his cheek: he believes in this bluster, and that's the fun of Glow. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released July 28, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released November 22, 2018 | Atlantic Records

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Country - Released December 1, 2014 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released April 21, 2015 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released April 21, 2015 | Atlantic Nashville

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£15.99
£13.99

Ambient/New Age - Released October 28, 2016 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released February 24, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released August 4, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

One of the appealing things about Brett Eldredge -- maybe his chief attribute, really -- is his easy touch. Eldredge never pushes a lyric or melody, a signature that nicely melds with the cool soul undercurrents that run throughout his music. This attitude and sound gelled on Illinois, the 2015 sophomore set that produced the chart-topping hits "Lose My Mind" and "Wanna Be That Song," but Eldredge refines it further on this eponymous 2017 album. If anything, Brett Eldredge showcases the singer's softer side more than its predecessors. Sure, there are moments where tracks get overloaded and oversaturated with guitars, beats, and more -- "Love Someone" opens with an avalanche of rhythm that settles into a singalong chorus; the hooks on "Superhero" are punctuated with electronic whoops and churning six-strings; the first single "Somethin' I'm Good At" rattles with a big, stomping beat and a stilted rap -- but Brett Eldredge's heart resides in the quieter moments. A lot of this gentler material is of the romantic persuasion, but what lends the album depth is how he'll take a detour to pen a mash note to his brother, a song that earns its sentiment through telling details. His love songs may not be quite as incisive, but they're well-crafted, from their melodies to their sumptuous productions, which borrow as much from soft rock as they do from modern R&B or country. Such fusions sound as appealing on the sunny pop tunes as they do on the ballads, and that is why Brett Eldredge succeeds: It's a smooth, easygoing good time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£1.99

Country - Released May 12, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

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Country - Released June 9, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville

£1.99

Ambient/New Age - Released November 28, 2017 | Atlantic Nashville