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Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released January 13, 2017 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Orchid Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released May 11, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
While Israeli-Russian pianist Boris Giltburg’s career is taking off all over the world, he has felt very close to Belgium ever since he won first prize in the 2013 Queen Elisabeth Competition. After several recordings for EMI (Warner), here he gives a studio rendition of the Third Concerto, and the Variations on a Theme of Corelli by Sergei Rachmaninov, on his tenth album for Naxos, which completes his often-unique approach to the Russian pianist-composer. The Études-tableaux and the Second Concerto divided opinion, with some seeing him as a "new Glenn Gould" (sic) who would do away with routines, while others drew attention to the total indifference of his style. Boris Giltburg's technique is such that he can give free rein to his imagination while taking care of the minute details of one of the most difficult concertos in the repertoire. Fascinated by the manufacture of instruments, in 2016 he took up the new 102-key piano from French manufacturer Stephen Paulello, a thrilling instrument which the musical world has been eagerly anticipating for a long time, and which proves that, just like in the 19th century, the piano can still evolve towards other sounds. For this Concerto n° 3, recorded at Glasgow's Royal Concert Hall, Boris Giltburg returns to his dear Fazioli piano and is joined by Mexican conductor Carlo Miguel Prieto at the head of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 4, 2012 | Orchid Classics

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award
Sergey Prokofiev's so-called War Sonatas weren't originally given that title, and the first of them was premiered by the composer in 1940, before the Soviet Union entered World War II. They were, however, conceived as a group, and as Russian-Israeli pianist Boris Giltburg points out in his notes, the Stalinist purges of the late 1930s easily provided an alternate source of gloom and stress for the composer. At any rate, these three piano sonatas are documents of their time. Not explicitly referential to or evocative of external events like many of Shostakovich's works of the same period, they offer agitated, swirling, and structurally detailed opening movements and brutally difficult, mechanistic finales softened only by small episodes and by tender slow movements that seem to reflect Prokofiev's growing involvement with Mira Mendelson, soon to become his second wife. These are remarkable depictions of calm within the most intense storms imaginable. These sonatas were specialties of the great Russian pianists of the middle 20th century, Sviatoslav Richter above all, but those wanting a version that's sonically more up-to-date (and actually quite well recorded although graphically challenged) might consider this one by one of the many young pianists emerging from the still-vibrant Russian system. Giltburg is not the most profoundly expressive pianist on the scene, but he's there where it counts in these sonatas: in the finales where virtuosity becomes expressive of how modern humans are in the grip of relentless powers beyond themselves. These are, in a word, exciting performances, and they make one look forward to Giltburg's takes on other repertory that lies near the edge of the piano's technical possibilities.
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Solo Piano - Released May 6, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released February 3, 2015 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
Russo-Israeli pianist Boris Giltburg has been one of the major prizewinners of the mid-2010s, and it's easy to see why: his suave, technically flawless playing is of the kind that's catnip to prize juries and quite a few members of the critical sphere. He did very well with Prokofiev and even Rachmaninov, where the meaning of the music is contained within technical devices. There is no question that the restrained, lightly poetic path he traces through Schumann's three big early sets of miniatures will be to the taste of listeners who like Schumann wrapped up just so, and find him the progenitor of the countless salon miniatures that followed over the next century or so. There's considerable justification for this position; even as Giltburg plays them, the Papillons, Op. 2, were sufficiently different from anything else being written in 1831 that you can still feel the sensation they made. It's equally true that for many listeners Giltburg's performance of Carnaval, Op. 9, especially, will totally fail to evoke the rambunctious spirit of the holiday portrayed, and throughout the program there is a certain lack of the transgressive dark side the young Schumann embodied. Probably the slighter, fantasy-imbued Davidsbündlertänze, Op. 6, come off the best here, but sample well for Schumann with more grit.
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Classical - Released May 5, 2006 | Warner Classics