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Alternative & Indie - Released November 24, 2017 | One Little Indian

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Flitting between cutting edge technologies and organic sensations (verging on physical), Vulnicura resuscitated the Björk of Homogenic and Vespertine. We saw a Björk who had rarely been so exposed, with her break-up from the video and visual artist Mathew Barney being at the heart of this heavy album from 2015, both in her lyrics and her musical architecture. To help her with her task, the Icelander was surrounded by two accomplices from the electro sphere: the British Bobby Krlic a.k.a. The Haxan Cloa and the young Venezuelan Alejandro Ghersi a.k.a. Arca. The latter is now at the heart of Utopia which was released this autumn. Though he joined Björk on Vulnicura once the songs had been written, this time round he worked with her from the start of the project to the point that Björk constantly insists in interviews that the record was entirely conceived by the two of them. Like with the worlds of Actress or Oneohtrix Point Never, Arca has always known how to mix the most cerebral corners of electronic music with the most physiological. In other words, you couldn’t find better reasons to wander the planet of Björk. Yes, wandering. That’s how you feel with Utopia. This master at the top of her game takes you by the hand with her unique voice, carrying you through multiple textures, sometimes thick and heavy, (Arisen My Senses) but also airy like never before (Blissing Me, Utopia). It is however in the more understated compositions that Björk is at her most convincing. But Arca is not the sole key element of this tenth studio album. The Icelander brings back her weapon of choice that hasn’t left her side since the age of 5: the flute! It’s a common thread in her mad and fantasizing work that cannot be fully digested in a single listening. Björk Guðmundsdóttir is no Taylor Alison Swift and Utopia proves this! © MD/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 13, 2017 | One Little Indian Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Track
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 26, 2015 | One Little Indian Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Never one to do things timidly, with Vulnicura Björk delivers a breakup album that doesn't just express sadness -- it immerses listeners in the total devastation of heartbreak. Starting with the album cover's wound/vulva imagery, she explores the tightly linked emotional and physical pain the end of a relationship brings with an intensity that has been missing from her music for too long. As expertly as she wedded feelings and concepts on Medúlla, Volta, and especially Biophilia, hearing her sing directly about her emotions is a galvanizing reminder of just how good she is at it. For the first time in a long time, the conceptual framework of a Björk album feels like it's in service of the feelings she needs to express, and as she traces the before, during, and after of a breakup, she links Vulnicura to the most emotionally bare parts of her discography. The clearest connection is to Homogenic's electro-orchestral drama, which she updates on "Stonemilker." The way Björk sings "emotional needs" echoes "Joga"'s "emotional landscapes" and prepares listeners for the state of emergency that she's about to throw her listeners into. On "History of Touches," she inverts the hushed intimacy of Vespertine (the album that celebrated the beginning of her relationship with artist Matthew Barney, just as this one chronicles its end) with choppy synth-strings that convey the fractured sensuality of being physically close and emotionally worlds apart. However, Vulnicura's songs are often longer and more deconstructed than either of those albums, and the involvement of co-producers Arca and Haxan Cloak (who also handled most of the mixing) ensures that this is some of Björk's darkest music yet. "Lionsong" brilliantly captures the nauseating anxiety of an uncertain relationship, its warped harmonies and teetering strings evoking a high-stakes game of "he loves me, he loves me not." Even though Björk crawls out of the abyss on the album's final third, which culminates with the relatively hopeful "Quicksand," that agonizing middle section is Vulnicura's crowning achievement and crucible. The ten-minute "Black Lake" allows Björk the space to let everything unravel, and as the strings drone and the beats tower and topple, her straightforward lyrics ("You have nothing to give/Your heart is hollow") perfectly distill the moments of purging and clarity that eventually point the way out of heartache. Here and on "Family," where Haxan Cloak's claustrophobic production makes Björk's anguish (the way she sings "sorrow" contains multitudes) all the more wrenching, the purity of her expression is both highly personal and universal. Vulnicura honors her pain and the necessary path through and away from loss with some of her bravest, most challenging, and most engaging music. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 19, 2012 | One Little Indian Records

For the singles from her album/educational tool/multimedia app Biophilia, Björk recruited artists as distinctive, ambitious, and rule-breaking as she is to provide remixes. Spanning newer acts like Death Grips to longtime collaborators like Matthew Herbert, Bastards gathers the most striking reworkings of Biophilia's songs. Where the album had a fittingly organic flow to its meditations on nature (human and otherwise), Bastards branches out from that concept while remaining true to its essence. These tracks aren't as lacking in parentage as the collection's title suggests, but they are notably unlike each other and the album that spawned them. "Crystalline" inspired two of the best, and most different, remixes: Omar Souleyman imbues the track with his Syrian-tinged electronics, transforming the linear vocal melody into something almost unrecognizable yet entirely natural-sounding. Meanwhile, Herbert (who contributes three remixes to Bastards) adds jagged beats that mimic the raw beauty of crystal growths. While many of these reworkings expand on Biophilia's outbursts, some of the best are also the quietest. On their version of "Mutual Core," These New Puritans largely stay out of the way of Björk's powerhouse vocals, instead dropping brass and piano in and out of the track for a more subtly dynamic approach. Elsewhere, the Slips' take on "Moon" emphasizes that song's fragility, and Alva Noto's remix of "Dark Matter" makes it all the more spectral. While not every experiment here works this well, Bastards delivers the kind of envelope-pushing expected from a Björk remix album. Diehards who have all of Biophilia's singles may not need this, but it's still a fine collection in its own right. ~ Heather Phares
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Electro - Released October 27, 2008 | One Little Indian Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2008 | One Little Indian Records

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Electro - Released March 2, 2009 | One Little Indian Records

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Electro - Released January 1, 1995 | One Little Indian Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2010 | Wellhart Ltd - One Little Indian Records Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2009 | One Little Indian Records

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Electro - Released August 4, 2008 | One Little Indian Records

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Electro - Released January 1, 1995 | One Little Indian Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 21, 2018 | One Little Indian Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 15, 2017 | One Little Indian

Alternative & Indie - Released October 6, 2017 | One Little Indian Records

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