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Jazz - Released September 6, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Piano and trumpet duets are relatively rare. In 1928, while recording Weather Bird, Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines kicked things off, followed much later by Chet Baker and Paul Bley (with Diane in 1985), Tom Harrell and Jacky Terrasson (Moon and Sand in 1991), Martial Solal and Eric le Lann (Portrait in Black and White in 2000), Martial Solal and Dave Douglas (Rue de Seine in 2006), Uri Caine and Paolo Fresu (Things in 2006), Enrico Rava and Stefano Bollani (Rava Plays Rava in 1999 and The Third Man in 2007), Oscar Peterson on five albums (with Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis and Harry “Sweets” Edison), Clark Terry’s One On One in 2000 (with fourteen different pianists!) and, most recently, Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith (A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke in 2016)... Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai have known each other since their teens in Tel Aviv. The pianist even featured on the trumpeter’s two ECM albums, Into the Silence and Cross My Palm With Silver. Their innate complicity allows them to improvise freely, playfully, and intensely on Playing the Room, their first work as a duo. As the title suggests, the two Israelis also incorporate the room – in this case the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI studio in Lugano – into their sound and they make full use of its resonant acoustics. They each sign a theme in turn before embarking on an eclectic repertoire by John Coltrane (Cresent), Duke Ellington (Azalea), Abdullah Ibrahim (Kofifi Blue), Ornette Coleman (Dee Dee), Milt Jackson (Ralph’s New Blues), Alexander Argov (Shir Eres) and Stevie Wonder (Sir Duke). And they transform this heterogeneous programme into utterly moving chamber jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 29, 2016 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 5, 2017 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released November 1, 2002 | Fresh Sound Records

Distinctions Choc Jazzman
Avishai Cohen, the trumpet player (not to be confused with the bassist/keyboardist of the same name), comes from a rich musical heritage in his native Israel. His sister is clarinetist Anat Cohen, his brother saxophonist Yuval Cohen, and together they front a fine progressive/contemporary jazz group, 3 Cohens. For his debut CD as a leader, the trumpeter has chosen a trumpet/bass/drums format, challenging because there are no chordal instruments to play off of. The sparseness of the instrumentation means there's nothing to lean on, play off of, or hold back from. This lends itself to the burnished attack and matted finish the horn offers, but also can tend to lead to overly lengthy stretches where Cohen's playing has to constantly command attention and remain interesting to the listener. Certainly drummer Jeff Ballard (also a member of the other Avishai Cohen's bands) is more than valiant in keeping the rhythm navigation on an intriguing keel. Two ten-and-a-half-minute tracks, "The Trumpet Player" and "Shablool," could be virtually the same piece, both in waltz time, both drawn out and singular-minded, both more treatise than short story. "The Fast" is a neo-bop, upbeat jam that displays Cohen's clean lines and angular ideas. Clearly influenced by hard boppers like Clifford Brown, Lee Morgan, and Freddie Hubbard, Cohen takes those precepts and turns them into inexhaustible Zen-like epics. Tenor saxophonist Joel Frahm is added, but plays after the fact on the 5/4 exercise "Olympus," taking the first solo, while a welcome interchange during "Idaho" mixes the group dynamic in a manner reminiscent of the partnership between Don Cherry and John Coltrane. The trio does a nice version of Coltrane's "Dear Lord" in 4/4 to implied 3/4, while Frahm jumps in as a soloist only for Ornette Coleman's choppy "Giggin'," where Cohen leaps out of his shell after a playful intro from Ballard and before a deft solo from bassist John Sullivan. The Trumpet Player is a first effort with loads of potential, and as Avishai Cohen's career goes ahead, there will be many collaborators to join with and concepts to explore. This CD sports clear, present, and solid musicianship, but if there is a shortcoming to the proceedings, it is the sameness or lack of variety that prevents the music from becoming great. That should happen in due time. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 27, 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
After a beautiful introspective debut for the label ECM, Avishai Cohen changes gears with his band Big Vicious. A unique cast around the Israeli trumpeter boasts two drummers (Aviv Cohen and Ziv Ravitz), an electric bass player (Yonatan Albalak) and a guitarist (Uzi Ramirez). This jazz-wielding quintet grew up with a thousand other sounds in mind. Hence this assembly of plural sound textures from electronic music as well as rock, classical, pop and trip hop. We are treated to big and improbably leaps, such as the one between Massive Attack and Beethoven, the two names whose works Big Vicious revisits (Teardrop and Moonlight Sonata). Avishai Cohen sometimes seems to be wearing the clothes of his elders Jon Hassell and Don Ellis. In particular, he tones down his leader's aura to let the quintet advance as one. It is precisely the homogeneity and atmospheric sound of Big Vicious that makes the whole original. And whether the compositions are trippy (Intent), uptempo (King Kutner) or downright experimental (Fractals), they share a real unique narrative force. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released August 9, 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Released September 6, 2019 | ECM

Booklet
Piano and trumpet duets are relatively rare. In 1928, while recording Weather Bird, Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines kicked things off, followed much later by Chet Baker and Paul Bley (with Diane in 1985), Tom Harrell and Jacky Terrasson (Moon and Sand in 1991), Martial Solal and Eric le Lann (Portrait in Black and White in 2000), Martial Solal and Dave Douglas (Rue de Seine in 2006), Uri Caine and Paolo Fresu (Things in 2006), Enrico Rava and Stefano Bollani (Rava Plays Rava in 1999 and The Third Man in 2007), Oscar Peterson on five albums (with Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis and Harry “Sweets” Edison), Clark Terry’s One On One in 2000 (with fourteen different pianists!) and, most recently, Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith (A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke in 2016)... Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai have known each other since their teens in Tel Aviv. The pianist even featured on the trumpeter’s two ECM albums, Into the Silence and Cross My Palm With Silver. Their innate complicity allows them to improvise freely, playfully, and intensely on Playing the Room, their first work as a duo. As the title suggests, the two Israelis also incorporate the room – in this case the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI studio in Lugano – into their sound and they make full use of its resonant acoustics. They each sign a theme in turn before embarking on an eclectic repertoire by John Coltrane (Cresent), Duke Ellington (Azalea), Abdullah Ibrahim (Kofifi Blue), Ornette Coleman (Dee Dee), Milt Jackson (Ralph’s New Blues), Alexander Argov (Shir Eres) and Stevie Wonder (Sir Duke). And they transform this heterogeneous programme into utterly moving chamber jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 29, 2016 | ECM

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Jazz - Released May 5, 2017 | ECM

CD£8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Fresh Sound New Talent

Avishai Cohen, the trumpet player (not to be confused with the bassist/keyboardist of the same name), comes from a rich musical heritage in his native Israel. His sister is clarinetist Anat Cohen, his brother saxophonist Yuval Cohen, and together they front a fine progressive/contemporary jazz group, 3 Cohens. For his debut CD as a leader, the trumpeter has chosen a trumpet/bass/drums format, challenging because there are no chordal instruments to play off of. The sparseness of the instrumentation means there's nothing to lean on, play off of, or hold back from. This lends itself to the burnished attack and matted finish the horn offers, but also can tend to lead to overly lengthy stretches where Cohen's playing has to constantly command attention and remain interesting to the listener. Certainly drummer Jeff Ballard (also a member of the other Avishai Cohen's bands) is more than valiant in keeping the rhythm navigation on an intriguing keel. Two ten-and-a-half-minute tracks, "The Trumpet Player" and "Shablool," could be virtually the same piece, both in waltz time, both drawn out and singular-minded, both more treatise than short story. "The Fast" is a neo-bop, upbeat jam that displays Cohen's clean lines and angular ideas. Clearly influenced by hard boppers like Clifford Brown, Lee Morgan, and Freddie Hubbard, Cohen takes those precepts and turns them into inexhaustible Zen-like epics. Tenor saxophonist Joel Frahm is added, but plays after the fact on the 5/4 exercise "Olympus," taking the first solo, while a welcome interchange during "Idaho" mixes the group dynamic in a manner reminiscent of the partnership between Don Cherry and John Coltrane. The trio does a nice version of Coltrane's "Dear Lord" in 4/4 to implied 3/4, while Frahm jumps in as a soloist only for Ornette Coleman's choppy "Giggin'," where Cohen leaps out of his shell after a playful intro from Ballard and before a deft solo from bassist John Sullivan. The Trumpet Player is a first effort with loads of potential, and as Avishai Cohen's career goes ahead, there will be many collaborators to join with and concepts to explore. This CD sports clear, present, and solid musicianship, but if there is a shortcoming to the proceedings, it is the sameness or lack of variety that prevents the music from becoming great. That should happen in due time. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

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Avishai Cohen (tp) in the magazine