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Jazz - Released November 28, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released October 13, 2017 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
The Tunisian Anouar Brahem is one of the most subtle contemporary oud players. Evolving in the ECM sphere, his discographic adventures therefore unfold on international grounds where music coming from ancestral traditions crosses paths with the contemporary and jazz worlds. The virtuoso, who celebrates his sixtieth birthday with this album, wanted to indulge himself by renewing a dialogue opened two decades ago with the bass player Dave Holland. And the cherry on top: this jazz master came with a former colleague of his Miles Davis period, the drummer Jack DeJohnette. Brahem also wanted to confront his Arabic lute against a high-level pianist and Manfred Eicher, Mister ECM, introduced him to the talented British musician Django Bates. The four men obviously get along well, and it shows in every corner of these nine tracks. Jazz is at the center, but far from being conventional, bound to be blended by mixing the Eastern scholarly grammar and the famous maqams. But most of the time it’s music both pure and without a label much like the virtuosos without borders who play it. © BM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released December 11, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 3F de Télérama
3 stars out of 5 -- "The music takes its time and unfolds on its own schedule, even embracing silence and stillness."
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Jazz - Released June 2, 1998 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Thimar is a most impressive collaboration between Brahem, soprano saxophonist/bass clarinetist John Surman and double bassist Dave Holland which superbly fuses the traditions of jazz with those of Arab classical music, pushing the parameters of both while succumbing to the clichés of neither. ~ Raymond McKinney
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Jazz - Released September 25, 2009 | ECM

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released December 11, 2015 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
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Jazz - Released September 10, 2002 | ECM

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Jazz - Released November 4, 2008 | ECM

Conte de L'incroyable Amour is Tunisian composer and oud virtuoso Anouar Brahem's follow-up to his excellent ECM debut, Barzakh. Like its predecessor, this release contains original material that mixes Arabic music and jazz improvisation and features a stellar band comprised of some of Turkey's finest musicians (this time out Brahem is joined by clarinetist Barbaros Erkose, nay (reed flute) player Kudsi Ergune, and the percussionist from Barzakh, Lassad Hosni). In contrast to Barzakh's livelier mood, though, the sound here is more meditative and even stark at times, especially on solo flights by both Brahem ("Iram Retrouvee") and Erkose ("Etincelles") and by way of Erguner's ethereal improvisations ("Diversion"). The pace picks up on the sympathetically played and joyous ensemble piece "Conte de L'incroyable Amour" and on the impassioned Brahem and Erkose duet, "Nayzak." ECM's typically sparse and airy production compliments Brahem's ascetic material without making it sound too dry. A wonderful album that, upon repeated listening, reveals many transcendent moments. ~ Stephen Cook
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Jazz - Released May 6, 1991 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 24, 2006 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 30, 1995 | ECM

Khomsa is the heroine in the movie Bezness, and also inspires one of many musical themes from Tunisian films and theater documented on this CD. Oud player Anouar Brahem has performed these pieces across a decade with different ensembles, but for the first time they were recorded in one studio setting. The instrumentation varies in size and de-emphasizes Brahem's role as a frontman. In fact, upon listening, this could just as easily be credited under the direction of the brilliant accordionist Richard Galliano, for his role is heard more often as the lead instrument. The musicians combine here and there with the dynamic ECM signature rhythm team of bassist Palle Danielsson and drummer Jon Christensen, or in certain instances pianist François Couturier, violinist Bechir Selmi, and on rare occasion soprano saxophonist Jean Marc Larché. The themes are luxurious, rich, beautiful, and organic, with no wasted motion or excesses, and there is a feeling of being on a journey. Galliano's solo "Comme un Depart," the solo oud of Brahem in "L'Infini Jour," and Selmi's "Regard de Mouette" get the caravan slowly started. "Claquent les Voiles" sports Brahem's mysterious Middle Eastern lines and chords with the masterful bassist and drummer, while "Vague" is hymnal in Galliano's ability to stretch long tied notes with his bellows. Couturier is a delicate stylist, matching theological timbres on "Vague," and working in tandem with Brahem during "Seule" and on the light 6/8 rhythm of "Nouvelle Vague" with Galliano. He also plays a little synthesizer, specifically during the circular "Un Sentier d'Alliance" aside overdubbed echoed piano and soprano sax. Most of the collective play on "Ain Ghazel," a sensitive and sensual musical sketch, features contrasting soprano sax from Larché, atypically animated drumming by Christensen, and Brahem's pensive oud as the period on a sentence. "Souffle un Vent de Sable" shows a group design in breathing, balanced tones led by Galliano, and Brahem coming in after the fact with the bass and drums. The title track displays a unified whole in the ECM spirit with Brahem, Galliano, Couturier, and Danielsson. Closest to jazz is "Des Rayons et des Ombres," a fast trio number with Galliano and the rhythm section approaching bop. "Comme une Absence" concludes the project with two overdubbed violin tracks from Selmi. The buyer should be aware that the personnel listed on the booklet cover does not reflect the entire combo at any one time. Otherwise, this is a beautiful contemporary statement reflecting the cinematic forms Brahem loves, mixed with European classical and improvisational sensibilities, professionally rendered, and well within the tradition of world jazz and the clean ECM concept. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released October 13, 2017 | ECM

The Tunisian Anouar Brahem is one of the most subtle contemporary oud players. Evolving in the ECM sphere, his discographic adventures therefore unfold on international grounds where music coming from ancestral traditions crosses paths with the contemporary and jazz worlds. The virtuoso, who celebrates his sixtieth birthday with this album, wanted to indulge himself by renewing a dialogue opened two decades ago with the bass player Dave Holland. And the cherry on top: this jazz master came with a former colleague of his Miles Davis period, the drummer Jack DeJohnette. Brahem also wanted to confront his Arabic lute against a high-level pianist and Manfred Eicher, Mister ECM, introduced him to the talented British musician Django Bates. The four men obviously get along well, and it shows in every corner of these nine tracks. Jazz is at the center, but far from being conventional, bound to be blended by mixing the Eastern scholarly grammar and the famous maqams. But most of the time it’s music both pure and without a label much like the virtuosos without borders who play it. © BM/Qobuz

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Anouar Brahem in the magazine