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Crooners - Released January 1, 1963 | Columbia - Legacy

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Popular songs are often associated with the vocalists that made them famous but few artists actually have the distinction of having a "theme" song along the lines of Bob Hope with "Thanks for the Memories." Even fewer can claim to have two theme songs attached to them and Andy Williams is one of those fortunate stars. After "Moon River" became forever linked to Williams, he recorded a holiday song for his first Christmas album that gave him a yuletide hit and theme song. "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year" was the right song at the right time for Williams when he began to perform it on his highly successful NBC Christmas specials that featured the whole Williams clan. Both the song and the television specials were so memorable, it wasn't long before Williams was crowned "Mr. Christmas." Of course having a full album of wonderful holiday songs perfectly performed doesn't hurt either and the Andy Williams Christmas Album was an instant hit when released in 1963 and has since become a traditional classic. Along with "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year," Williams cheerfully celebrates with the spirited medley "Happy Holidays/The Holiday Season" and is at his playful best on the irresistibly raucous "Kay Thompson's Jingle Bells." He also wraps his voice around chestnuts like "White Christmas" and "The Christmas Song" with all the warmth of a favorite blanket, while a soaring version of "O Holy Night" is both enchanting and moving. His tender reading of the lesser-known "Sweet Little Jesus Boy" is as beautiful and serene as a crystal clear winter's night, but it is the instantly catchy opening line of "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year" that people remember the most. It is a fitting theme song not only for Andy "Mr.Christmas" Williams, but for the season as well and a sparkling highlight from a classic holiday album. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Crooners - Released October 5, 2009 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released May 10, 2013 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released February 24, 2017 | Columbia - Legacy

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Ambient/New Age - Released September 27, 2013 | Columbia - Legacy

Lounge - Released July 10, 2020 | Columbia - Legacy

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Crooners - Released June 11, 2009 | Legacy Recordings

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Crooners - Released November 1, 1965 | Columbia - Legacy

Chances are that when Andy Williams released his first holiday album in 1963, he had no idea that his name would soon become synonymous with Christmas. The success of the album along with his Christmas television specials became traditional listening and viewing for many families in the years (and even decades) that followed. In 1965, Williams further enhanced his "Mr. Christmas" moniker by releasing a second seasonal collection, Merry Christmas. Although the album did not contain a definitive hit song like "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year," it was another well-rounded set of traditional favorites that became a perfect companion to the Andy Williams Christmas Album. The overall tone of Merry Christmas is a bit quieter than the first album but there are still a few lively moments as in the breezy opening "Sleigh Ride," where an infectious "jing-a-ling, jing-jing-a-ling" is sung behind Williams' satiny voice. "Christmas Holiday" was probably meant to be this set's "Most Wonderful Time," but it never caught on in the same way despite having an exciting arrangement and vocal performance. Williams' dark reading of "My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music helped to turn the non-holiday oriented song into a Christmas standard while a delicate "Some Children See Him" and the joyous "The Bells of St. Mary's" round out an album that is sung to perfection. Williams would go on to release other holiday collections, but none of them would capture the magical memories created by Merry Christmas and its predecessor. Thanks to good timing, excellent selections, and a voice that makes one feel warm and at home, Andy Williams recorded not just one, but two perennial classics that will be heard for generations to come. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Crooners - Released April 7, 1987 | Columbia

The singles chart hit versions of composer Henry Mancini and lyricist Johnny Mercer's "Moon River," the theme song for the film Breakfast at Tiffany's, were by Jerry Butler and by Mancini himself. But Andy Williams made his own claim to the song by using it as the title to this LP of movie themes, which, not coincidentally, was released in the week before Williams was scheduled to sing "Moon River" at the 1962 Academy Awards ceremony. He does a masterful version with the song, and also does well with the rest of the songs, which include some recent fare ("Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," "A Summer Place," "The Exodus Song," "The Second Time Around"), but also old favorites like "As Time Goes By." "Maria" and "Tonight" are the big ballads from West Side Story, which began life as a Broadway musical before it went on to be the big movie hit of 1961, justifying the use of the music here. Williams has fun with "Never on Sunday," even including the Greek lyrics. The LP, a highlight in the singer's career, makes a case that the early '60s constituted a renaissance period for movie themes. (Spurred on by Williams' 1962 Oscar Night performance of "Moon River" and its victory in the Best Song category, Moon River & Other Great Movie Themes went on to spend 176 weeks in the Billboard LPs chart, peaking at number three and going gold. Notwithstanding the earlier hit single versions by others, "Moon River" became Williams' signature song for the rest of his career.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 31, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Crooners - Released February 3, 1971 | Columbia

This is a precious feast to enjoy of delightful '70s love songs, sung and performed with sincerity by beloved pop singer talent Andy Williams. Though not as special or charming as the original performances, Williams gives all of his soul and heart to pull off some stirring renditions of the amiable type to the kind listener. Favorites of the '70s feature the Beatles' "Something," James Taylor's "Fire and Rain," and Elton John's "Your Song." Invigorating at times, the songs seem to achieve the purpose of easing the listener's stress-filled day. Dick Glasser gives much of his time as producer in finding Andy Williams' unique sound, with Artie Butler and Dick Hazard playing a splendid role in the arrangements. A wistful breath of fresh air away from the takeover of entertainers Frank Sinatra and Neil Diamond, the record is a pleasant listening experience for those who appreciate romantic ballads and melancholy orchestra background music. This collection shows just how easy it came to cover love ballads and pop hits in the '70s, giving Williams and his dazzling entertainer style voice the right time to shine during his days of stardom. So turn your lights down low and get with the one you share dreams with, and be prepared to feel the love. © Shawn M. Haney /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 22, 1966 | Legacy Recordings

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Christmas Music - Released December 10, 2014 | Christmas Time

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Rock - Released August 7, 2015 | Special Markets - Word

Lounge - Released May 29, 2020 | Columbia - Legacy

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Lounge - Released June 19, 2020 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released May 15, 1968 | Columbia - Legacy

In the late '60s, record company executives like Clive Davis of Columbia were encouraging their middle-of-the-road pop singers to cover the songs of contemporary pop/rock performers as a way of staying current. Andy Williams, who was a bit younger than his peers, needed no such encouragement, as he had been drawing on the recent hit parade for some of his material for years. But Honey marked his complete crossover to such an approach. Where earlier Williams albums had been a canny mix of movie songs, standards, pop hits, and foreign -- especially French -- material, ten of Honey's 11 tracks were songs that had been Top 40 hits in the last two years. (The only exception was "Our Last Goodbye," co-written by Williams favorite Nick De Caro, which musically was a retread of another recent Top 40 hit, "A Whiter Shade of Pale.") True, there were a couple of movie songs ("This Is My Song" from The Countess From Hong Kong and "Theme From 'Valley of the Dolls,'" plus "Scarborough Fair/Canticle," not written for, but heavily featured in, The Graduate) and even one show tune ("The Impossible Dream [The Quest]" from Man of La Mancha), and "Love Is Blue" was French. But the songs were for the most part closely associated with hit recordings by the likes of the Association, the 5th Dimension, and Glen Campbell. The arrangements closely resembled those of the hit recordings, so the appeal of the album seemed to be exclusively to Williams fans who wanted to hear their hero, rather than Bobby Goldsboro, sing the maudlin hit "Honey." Columbia didn't even put Williams' current single, "Sweet Memories," on the LP. The singer did his best and was rewarded with yet another Top Ten gold-record seller, but the album lacked the balance of earlier efforts. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released September 8, 2017 | Columbia - Legacy

Lounge - Released June 19, 2020 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released December 6, 1966 | Columbia - Legacy