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Solo Piano - Released April 12, 2019 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
For a truly great interpretation it’s not enough just to play a historical instrument, the playing also has to be up to scratch. This recording released by the world-renowned label ECM showcases a pianist of the highest calibre playing the wonderful Viennese Brodmann piano. András Schiff captures the convergence of thought and sound remarkably well and seldom before have we been given so much insight into Schubert’s innermost thoughts. The softness and the unmistakable legato that the pianist produces on this Viennese instrument give the Sonatas D. 958 and D. 959 an indescribable feeling of nostalgia. But Schubert’s inward revolt was growing and András Schiff leads us steadily to the edge of the abyss. The crystalline sounds of the Scherzo in the Sonata D. 959 are as enchanting as the sound of ancient harpists who were so often depicted by German Romantics. This exploration into sound is also marvellous in the Impromptus D. 899 and the 3 Klavierstücke D. 946 or “Three Piano Pieces”, which have a very expressive counterpoint that differ from the unfathomable depth of the sonatas. This album is a revelation into a whole new world of sound that is unveiled as András Schiff’s fingers touch the keys. Inspiring. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 28, 2009 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 27, 2015 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released September 27, 2013 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
ECM New Series is better known for its documentation of contemporary works, but the music of the past sometimes receives coverage when artists bring a new perspective to it. The Diabelli Variations, Op. 120; the Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111; and the Six Bagatelles, Op. 126, are among the most original and intellectually stimulating works Ludwig van Beethoven composed for the piano, and the sophisticated interpretations of András Schiff are especially worthwhile for their insights into authentic performance practice and reception. Here, Schiff gives the listener options between a relatively modern sounding version of the Diabelli Variations and a period interpretation, without favoring one or the other. On the first CD he plays the Sonata and the Diabelli Variations on a Bechstein piano from 1921, though with minimal pedaling and a restrained execution that allows every inner voice and subtle dynamic to be appreciated. While this piano is not as hard or bright sounding as a modern Steinway, it is familiar to modern ears and most listeners will readily accept it. On the second CD, Schiff plays the Diabelli Variations, along with the Six Bagatelles, on a smaller sounding Franz Brodmann fortepiano, an original instrument from around 1820, Beethoven's time period. While it sometimes sounds tinnier, the fortepiano is in wonderful condition, and by Schiff's own testimony, it "sounds fresher, bolder, and infinitely more subtle." This side-by-side demonstration allows comparisons between the two instruments, and to consider other differences. One need not choose one recording over the other, but Schiff's exceptional performances would certainly inform such a decision, if one had to be made. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 25, 2016 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released September 9, 2003 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released May 4, 2001 | ECM New Series

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Classical - Released November 25, 2016 | ECM New Series

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Classical - Released August 24, 2012 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet
András Schiff recorded his first set of J.S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier for London in the mid-1980s, but the passage of time, personal reflection, and improvements in digital recording have contributed to making his second recording of "The 48" a necessity, this time on ECM New Series. As eloquent as ever, and always meticulous in execution, Schiff plays the two books of preludes and fugues without use of the piano's pedals, so his touch and control are evident in every note and in the interplay of lines, which are cleanly separated. The transparent recording, which is de rigueur for ECM, is a great aid in conveying Schiff's scrupulous playing, so the music almost seems to exist in its own pristine, abstract realm, without the botherments of background noises or sounds of physical exertion. However, there is an ideal amount of resonance in the studio space that heightens the timbres of the piano without blurring the music, so Schiff doesn't perform in a vacuum. The earlier recordings garnered high praise from critics and Schiff's many admirers, so this exceptional presentation is sure to win him a new and well-deserved audience. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released October 19, 2007 | Warner Classics International

As so many recording artists have these days, Hungarian pianist András Schiff has been through a huge number of record companies in his career. He started on Hungaroton in the late '70s, then was briefly on Denon in the early '80s. He was with Decca from the mid-'80s through the mid-'90s before moving to Teldec for late '90s. After that, he was without a contract until he signed with ECM -- and this list doesn't count Schiff's one-off recordings on Vox and Orfeo. This six-disc set on Warner Classics contains all Schiff's solo recordings for Teldec: his two discs of Haydn, his two discs of Schumann, his single disc combining variations by Handel, Brahms, and Reger, and his single disc containing all Smetana's Polkas for solo piano. As is always the case with Schiff's recordings, no matter who the composer is, the performances are uniformly superlative and interpretively consistent. Schiff is no chameleon: he always sounds just like himself. His tone is clear but warm and full; his technique is clean but never fussy or empty; his interpretations are generous but always tastefully reserved. It's true that his Schumann is more poetic than his Haydn, his Haydn more elegant than his Handel, his Handel more flamboyant than his Brahms, his Brahms more playful than his Reger, his Reger more severe than his Smetana, and his Smetana more melancholy than any other composer this side of Rachmaninov, but it's also true that Schiff always and everywhere sounds like his own sweet-tempered and reasonable self. Aside from the repertoire, the biggest difference between these recordings and earlier and later Schiff recordings is the recording philosophy of the label. Where Decca had Schiff sounding soft-grained and blended, Teldec has him sounding brighter and sharper. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 24, 2012 | ECM New Series

András Schiff recorded his first set of J.S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier for London in the mid-1980s, but the passage of time, personal reflection, and improvements in digital recording have contributed to making his second recording of "The 48" a necessity, this time on ECM New Series. As eloquent as ever, and always meticulous in execution, Schiff plays the two books of preludes and fugues without use of the piano's pedals, so his touch and control are evident in every note and in the interplay of lines, which are cleanly separated. The transparent recording, which is de rigueur for ECM, is a great aid in conveying Schiff's scrupulous playing, so the music almost seems to exist in its own pristine, abstract realm, without the botherments of background noises or sounds of physical exertion. However, there is an ideal amount of resonance in the studio space that heightens the timbres of the piano without blurring the music, so Schiff doesn't perform in a vacuum. The earlier recordings garnered high praise from critics and Schiff's many admirers, so this exceptional presentation is sure to win him a new and well-deserved audience. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1984 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released February 1, 2011 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released January 1, 1985 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released September 6, 1995 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released August 28, 2009 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet
András Schiff has recorded Bach's six partitas twice, first for Decca in 1985 and then for ECM in 2009, and both are superlative in their own ways. Schiff was then and is now a pianist possessing a fluent technique, an agile tone, and a sense of phrasing that makes counterpoint sing, but his interpretations of the Partitas have changed over 25 years. His later performances are more pointed and more poised, thoughtful, and ardent than his earlier one, but they are also less mellow and much less pedaled, with no less drive, but perhaps less lyricism. Whether Schiff's earlier or later performance appeals more will be a matter of personal taste. Less significant, perhaps, but still striking, is the difference in the quality of the sound. Decca's early digital sound, like its late stereo sound, was rich, deep, detailed, and atmospheric. ECM's late digital sound, like its early digital sound, is extremely clear and enormously immediate. With Decca, one is sitting a few rows in front of the pianist. With ECM, one is sitting on the bench with the pianist. © TiVo

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Andras Schiff in the magazine