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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca (UMO)

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca (UMO)

Having earned a five-minute standing ovation for his recent performance in the lead role of Jean Valjean in the 25th anniversary of West End musical Les Miserables, Blackpool-born tenor Alfie Boe, arguably Russell Watson's closest rival for the title of the U.K.'s most popular opera singer, couldn't have timed the release of his fifth studio album any better. Whereas his previous four releases have focused on classical favorites, hymns, and established standards, Bring Him Home is a collection of some of his best-loved film and show tunes, from South Pacific's "Some Enchanted Evening" to the more recent Moulin Rouge love theme, "Come What May," performed here as a duet with Wicked actress Kerry Ellis. Recorded in Prague and Copenhagen, its 12 tracks are often surprisingly unpredictable, with songs from James Bond's On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Louis Armstrong's "We Have All the Time in the World") and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory ("Pure Imagination") sitting alongside more traditional pieces from Sunset Boulevard ("As If We Never Said Goodbye"), My Fair Lady ("On the Street Where You Live"), and, of course, Les Miserables (the title track, also the first song Boe sang in public). However, his collaboration with Little Britain comedian and recent co-star Matt Lucas provides the album's unexpected highlight, on a stirring rendition of Man of La Mancha's "The Impossible Dream." Backed by James Morgan and Juliette Pochin's simple but effective orchestral production, Boe performs the likes of Blood Brothers' "Tell Me It's Not True" and Carousel's "If I Loved You" in his own powerful and emotional style, without ever detracting from or overpowering the original melodies, ensuring that Bring Him Home is always a respectful and passionate homage to the world of musical theater. Like Katherine Jenkins, Aled Jones, and his idol, Andrea Bocelli, Boe's shift into more popular music territory will undoubtedly attract a new audience, but with no compromises to his own unique vocal abilities, his previous classical fan base shouldn't be deterred either. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Classical - Released November 17, 2014 | Decca

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca

Trust is the eighth studio album from Alfie Boe and once again sees the singer step away from his classical roots, delivering an album of contemporary classics and standards. Produced by Larry Klein (Tracey Chapman, Joni Mitchell), the album sees Boe work his way through hits such as "You've Got a Friend," "Georgia on My Mind," and "Danny Boy." ~ Rich Wilson
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | UMSM

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Union Square

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Classical - Released March 4, 2011 | Union Square Music

Capitalizing on the success of his Decca-released Top Ten album Bring Him Home and his critically acclaimed performances in Les Misérables and La Boheme, Blackpool tenor Alfie Boe's first major label, EMI Classics, rush-released this 16-track best-of just in time for the Mother's Day market, the second time in just three months that the label raided his back catalog following the recently reissued The Sound of Alfie Boe. Released in such close proximity, You'll Never Walk Alone doesn't include any material from the latter, but even with only two other studio albums to select from, it's far from the hastily assembled cash-in you might expect. His increasingly widening fan base may already own the six tracks that appear from 2007's Onward, an accessible combination of hymns, traditional standards, and contemporary pop songs performed with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, such as "Amazing Grace," British patriotic song "I Vow to Thee My Country," and a cover version of Alison Krauss & Union Station's "A Living Prayer," and likewise with the four tracks chosen from the same year's La Passione, a more authentic Neapolitan-inspired operatic effort performed with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra including two odes to the Italian tenor Caruso by Ruggero Leoncavallo ("Mattinata") and Lucio Dalla's ("Caruso") along with Agustín Lara's Latin classic "Granada." But there are also six tracks that have never appeared on an Alfie Boe album before. There's a duet with Welsh soprano Natasha Marsh on a rendition of "Brindisi" from Verdi's La Traviata, which appeared on her 2008 self-titled effort, three digital-only releases ("Abide with Me," "Where'er You Walk," and "Cujus Animam" from Rossini's Stabat Mater), and a track that has only previously appeared on Myleene Klass' classical compilation Music for Romance (Donovan's "Fratello Solo Sorella Luna"), alongside one of his contributions to award-winning composer Howard Goodall's Eternal Light: A Requiem ("Agnus Dei"). While Boe moves further into the classical pop mainstream, You'll Never Walk Alone is a welcome reminder of his more natural operatic talents, whose combination of familiar and rarer material should appeal to newcomers and completists alike. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Classical - Released March 12, 2007 | Union Square Music

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Classical - Released November 17, 2014 | Decca

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca (UMO)

Trust is the eighth studio album from Alfie Boe and once again sees the singer step away from his classical roots, delivering an album of contemporary classics and standards. Produced by Larry Klein (Tracey Chapman, Joni Mitchell), the album sees Boe work his way through hits such as "You've Got a Friend," "Georgia on My Mind," and "Danny Boy." ~ Rich Wilson
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

To coincide with the release of his autobiography, "Britain's favourite tenor" follows up his 2011 effort Alfie with another foray into pure pop. This time he tackles some of the most famous and best-loved songs in the pop repertoire, by the likes of Simon & Garfunkel, the Walker Brothers, Elvis Presley, and more. The songs here, which Boe has always dreamed of performing, are given the full operatic treatment, in his usual style.
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca

Having reached the U.K. Top Ten for the first time, performed for the English National Opera in La Boheme and The Mikado, and received rave reviews for his role as Jean Valjean in Les Misérables, Blackpool tenor Alfie Boe rounds off an incredible year with his fifth studio album, simply titled Alfie. Proving that it's not just the musical theater and classical pop worlds that appreciate his talent, the follow-up to commercial breakthrough Bring Him Home also features a collaboration with none other than Robert Plant, who lends his yearning tones to a moving orchestral interpretation of Tim Buckley's acoustic folk song "Song to the Siren." It's a shame that Boe couldn't have persuaded the Led Zeppelin legend to stick around a little longer, as it's by far the most compelling offering on a record that -- apart from an emotive operatic reworking of Martina McBride's "In My Daughter's Eyes" -- plays it pretty safe. Alongside an understated acoustic version of Ewan MacColl's "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," there's a suitably wintry take on Judy Garland's "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," an impassioned adaptation of 17th century traditional English folk song "Over the Hills and Far Away," and a lushly produced rendition of Frank Sinatra's "It Was a Very Good Year." But elsewhere, Boe continues to delve into a more familiar catalog of show tunes, from Gershwin's Oh, Kay! jazz standard "Someone to Watch Over Me" to Ragtime's stirring choral-led "Wheels of a Dream" to the two numbers from Les Misérables, "Who Am I?" and "Empty Chairs at Empty Tables," the latter a duet with Michael Ball (better known as a solo piece for the character of Marius). Alfie should consolidate Boe's position as one of the U.K. classical crossover scene's biggest talents, but by proving he's capable of tackling material outside the box, you do wish that he'd be a bit braver and pursue his more adventurous leanings a little further. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca (UMO)