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Symphonic Music - Released March 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released November 10, 2017 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
For the third installment in Adam Fischer's Mahler cycle on CAvi-music, he leads the Düsseldorf Symphony in a straightforward and polished presentation of the Symphony No. 1 in D major, assembled from several concert recordings in February 2017. This 2018 release offers a nearly flawless version of one of Mahler's most popular symphonies, and Fischer prudently avoids any anachronistic associations with the symphony's earlier form as a symphonic poem. The Blumine movement, rejected by Mahler but frequently reinstated in recordings of the 1990s and 2000s, has not been included here, and even the nickname "Titan," which Mahler only used for two early performances, has been dropped. Fischer instead performs the score as Mahler published it in 1899, and confidently puts forward a realization that owes nothing to unfounded speculation. Indeed, this performance is so technically assured, carefully paced, and eloquently expressed, it fits into the mainstream of classic interpretations since the 1950s, and thanks to the exceptional engineering and editing, this is one of the best sounding of modern live recordings. Highly recommended.
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Classical - Released August 18, 2017 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
"The Fourth is Mahler’s most transparent and lyrical symphony – almost a chamber symphony. Probably also due to its rather reduced format, it has been received in unique and contradictory ways. Even during the time when international audiences had practically no knowledge of Mahler’s music, the Fourth remained relatively popular. Today it is regarded as less impressive than the First, Second, Third, Fifth and Sixth Symphonies; from my point of view, however, this stems from an unacceptable misunderstanding. Stylistically, the Fourth poses a truly special challenge I find quite exciting. It is Mahler’s “Pastoral Symphony”. The musical style of the Vienna Secession movement tended to integrate elements of Viennese musical tradition into purely classical works. Many listeners did not take that tendency seriously and branded it as harking back to overbaked ideas (I overheard statements to this effect when I was a child). Of all Mahler’s symphonies, the Fourth is perhaps the one where he puts those Viennese elements most clearly on display. I once even heard the cruel remark that Mahler’s Fourth Symphony amounted to nothing else than the expression of his sadness for not being Schubert. Frankly, this music is everything else but a Schubert imitation. Much of Schubert – and of Haydn – admittedly does resurface here, along with typical Viennese effects including a particular kind of glissando, for instance, and those stylistic means are one of the Fourth’s essential elements. We should therefore perform them in a way that makes them quite noticeable." (from booklet)
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Symphonic Music - Released November 17, 2009 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released June 4, 2013 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released August 25, 2009 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released May 24, 2007 | Da Capo

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Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2008 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released October 1, 2010 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released August 2, 2011 | Da Capo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released November 1, 2016 | Nimbus Records

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Symphonic Music - Released October 12, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released August 26, 2016 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
For the first installment of the Mahler Edition on CAvi-music, Adam Fischer leads a live performance of the Symphony No. 7 in E minor, assembled from different concerts in late November 2015. Perhaps the oddest of Mahler's symphonies in its structure and quirky mix of vernacular styles, the piece has been unofficially nicknamed "The Song of the Night," due to its dark first movement, its two Nachtmusiken, and the shadowy Scherzo at its center; only the bright and bumptious Rondo-Finale alleviates the pervasive nocturnal feeling. A conductor less attentive to formal considerations might let this symphony drift into a series of eccentric episodes or pseudo-tone poems, but Fischer maintains a clear sense of momentum through the five movements and firmly keeps the symphony on its "from dusk till dawn" trajectory. The Düsseldorf Symphony plays with skill and precision, keeping together without any signs of fatigue and playing with the commitment and passionate intensity of the world's great Mahler orchestras. This may be a curious way to begin a Mahler cycle, but this Seventh is an excellent indicator of great things to come.
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Full Operas - Released January 26, 2010 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 1993 | Nimbus Records

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Full Operas - Released October 5, 2010 | Da Capo

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Classical - Released February 1, 2007 | Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm

Founded in the late '80s just before the collapse of the Iron Curtain by Hungarian conductor Adam Fischer, the Österreichisch-Ungarische Philharmonie (aka, the Austro-Hungarian Philharmonic) had already recorded the complete symphonies of Franz Josef Haydn for the English Nimbus label in the '90s when it returned to selected symphonies for the German Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm label in the 2000s. And good as the earlier performances were, the later performances -- in this case, Symphonies No. 88 and No. 101 plus the Overture to the opera L'isola disabitata -- are even better. Familiarity with the entire body of Haydn's orchestral works has bred only deeper understanding and greater fondness in these musicians and the thousands of small but telling improvements in their performances. Listen just to Symphony No. 88's Menuetto and Trio -- to the swaggering upbeat into big timpani downbeat in the Menuetto or the evocative woodwinds in the Trio with the strings swelling delightfully behind them. In every moment of these performances, Fischer and his musicians show that sort of attention to detail -- and that kind of affection for idiom. Recorded in breathtakingly realistic sound in the main hall of Estrahazy Castle -- the room for which most of Haydn's orchestral music was originally conceived and executed -- this disc deserves to be heard by anyone who loves great music and great art.
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Classical - Released August 1, 2007 | Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm

How much Haydn is enough Haydn? Now that all the symphonies have been recorded several times, now that period-instrument and modern-instrument performances are available, and now that original versions, published versions, and variant versions have all been documented, is there really a need for more Haydn recordings? More specifically, is there really a need for a second series of recordings of Haydn's symphonies with Adam Fischer leading the Österreichisch-Ungarische Haydn-Philharmonie (aka the Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic)? After all, they had already recorded all of Haydn's symphonies label in the '90s for the English Nimbus in performances that were smart and stylish, and that set well with the composer's unique combination of high art, deep feeling, and good fun. If the performances are all as fine as this coupling of the Symphonies No. 97 and No. 102 with the Overture "L'anima del filosofo," the answer is yes. Fischer's understanding of Haydn's art has only grown deeper with time, and he finds more mystery in opening Largos, more emotion in central Adagios, more fun in Menuettos, and more exhilaration in closing Prestos here than in his previous recordings. Similarly, since its last outing on these works, the Österreichisch-Ungarische Haydn-Philharmonie has only gotten better. Plus, the inclusion of a less well-known Overture between the two well-known symphonies is an inspired idea, and, of course, the sound of MD&G's fine-grained, deep-resolution recording is an improvement not only on previous recordings, but on virtually anything except reality itself.
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Classical - Released February 1, 2005 | Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm