Albums

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Violin Concertos - Released September 28, 2018 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Fabio Biondi had his work cut out for him with the complete recordings of Vivaldi's violin concertos, as the Venetian left behind more than 250 works for one, two, three or four violins. Volume VI here offers a group of six concertos written in Prague and Bohemia in the course of his stay there between 1730 and 1731. Today, musicology has become much more of a science, and it is possible to put a date on these manuscripts by means of a precise analysis of the paper used by the composer if the music doesn't speak for itself. The Antonio Vivaldi of these pieces retains the style for which he is known and loved across Europe. Fabio Biondi notes that as there are only a few hints of Bohemian music in these concertos, which are more resemblant of Vivaldi's younger work. We might conclude that while abroad, the composer was writing pieces which, while new, were destined for use by his beloved students in the Pietà. Venetian chroniclers from the time often wrote of Vivaldi's virtuoso violin playing, admiring the inventiveness that he brought to the cadenzas of his concertos (the section at the end of a movement which is left open for creative improvisation) and the fantasy that he worked into his improvisations. While we have no proof that Vivaldi was the soloist for his own works during his Bohemian trip, Fabio Biondi, a true connoisseur of Vivaldi's style, clearly aims to apply this spirit to his recordings, and nowhere more so than here. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released December 2, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional sound - Hi-Res Audio
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Concertos - Released January 28, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Violin Concertos - Released November 18, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Le Choix de France Musique - Hi-Res Audio
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Violin Concertos - Released March 2, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet
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Concertos - Released March 7, 2006 | naïve classique

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Concertos - Released September 7, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released March 19, 2012 | naïve classique

Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
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Concertos - Released July 10, 2007 | naïve classique

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 24, 2014 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released August 26, 2013 | naïve classique

Booklet
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Classical - Released July 1, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional sound - Hi-Res Audio
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Concertos - Released October 24, 2011 | naïve classique

Distinctions Diapason d'or
Power, passion, technique; these are but a few words that describe French violinist Laurent Korcia's performance on this CD of two violin concertos. Korngold's is the first on the bill, and Korcia's liquid, singing tone does the music full justice. The Orchestre Philharmonique Royal de Liège plays lushly under the leadership of Jean-Jacques Kantorow, giving the work the quality of a 20th century Hollywood score. Korcia's technique contrasts athleticism with lyricism, digging into the string and giving the music a harsh, almost violent quality when necessary. Yet in the second movement, he goes at the music tenderly and demonstrates control when going up to high notes, although some of the high notes, when played at a piano dynamic, become a bit wobbly and sound unsupported. The final movement of the concerto certainly makes the listener take notice, for Korcia makes it sing. He and the orchestra bring a sense of liveliness and levity to the music. There is also a fearlessness to Korcia's style -- string crossings do not daunt him -- and the use of a Stradivarius violin certainly helps produce a gorgeous sound. This expressive music is not easy to coordinate, but the members of the orchestra are able to do so thanks to Kantorow's strong musicianship. The true highlight of the album is the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto, which showcases Korcia's prodigal talents. The orchestra builds in intensity and then gives way to the clean, pure violin entrance. The recording quality is very strong, and Korcia simply shines. His technique through the difficult demands of the concerto is solid, and at times he chooses to bow a bit roughly and aggressively. This does not seem to be inappropriate; rather, it seals Korcia's interpretation as his own. Here again, the orchestral sound is lush, and the players create the appropriate drama necessary in this passionate work. The cadenza, which is oddly in the middle of the first movement, makes one sit up and listen; Korcia gives it a stunning interpretation with excellent rhythmic precision. Some of the rough-around-the-edges quality can be heard in the final movement as well, but it is nothing short of heartbreakingly gorgeous. Korcia invokes pull-on-your-heartstrings emotion that alternates with showoff virtuosity. There is no question that this is an excellent CD that does what an album of violin concertos ought to do: leave the listener impressed, moved, and longing for more.
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Classical - Released September 20, 2010 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaya has recorded both traditional repertoire and music by contemporary Turkish composer Fazil Say, and on this album she turns to folk traditions of Eastern Europe and music based on those traditions. In addition to the folk music of Hungary, Romania, and the Ukraine, she plays works by Romanians George Enescu and Grigoras Dinicu, Transylvanian György Ligeti, Hungarian György Kurtág, Maurice Ravel, and Cuban-Chinese composer Jorge Sanchez-Chiong, who was a classmate of Kopatchinskaya's in Vienna. The roots of this music are close to Kopatchinskaya's heart and the album is clearly a labor of love. Her father, Viktor Kopatchinsky, who was the premiere cimbalom player in the Soviet Union and is a dazzling virtuoso in his own right, joins her, as does her mother, violinist and violist Emilia Kopatchinskaya, and pianist Mihuela Ursuleasa and bassist Martin Gjakonovski. All the performers play with brilliant and uninhibited flair, and not surprisingly they have the most freedom to cut loose in the folk music, which comes off with ferocious primal energy. In Dinicu's Hora staccato in the arrangement by Heifetz, once a staple of violinists' encore repertoire, the cimbalom takes the piano part. Ravel made a version of his Tzigane for a piano modified to sound like a cimbalom, so it was a natural step to arrange the part for an actual cimbalom, and it's entirely effective, allowing the familiar piece to be heard in a new light. The most avant-garde piece, and one of the most entertaining, is Sanchez-Chiong's Crin, which requires as much virtuoso vocalization as fiddling. The appealing performances and repertoire make this an album that should be of interest to anyone who loves Eastern European folk music and spirited music-making. Naïve's sound is clear, present, and vibrant.
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Classical - Released April 19, 2010 | naïve classique

Booklet
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Classical - Released April 6, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet
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Classical - Released March 3, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions Exceptional sound
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Chamber Music - Released September 15, 2008 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released April 3, 2007 | naïve classique