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Pop - Released January 29, 2021 | Polydor Records

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She was set to be one of the revelations of 2020. But the pandemic got in the way, and Celeste Epiphany Waite postponed the planned release of her first album. Celeste is a new UK sensation. She received the Rising Star prize at the prestigious Brit Awards, an honour which has been bestowed upon such promising young people as Sam Smith or Adele, who went on to enjoy colossal success and international stardom. Add another nomination, for the BBC's Sound of 2020, and the growing interest in this newcomer to the global pop scene was clear. While waiting for the album, Celeste did not sit idly by. She provided some vocals for the high-flying soundtrack for Pixar's successful Soul, and for the series The Chicago Seven, which was broadcast on Netflix. In terms of musical education, Celeste was brought up almost exclusively on blues, jazz, and golden-age soul by James Brown, Aretha Franklin (whom Celeste worships), Nina Simone and Sarah Vaughan. A coppery, nonchalant voice, tinged with a hoarse fragility, Celeste instantly sounds like a little sister to Adele and Amy Winehouse. Finally, the album is here. With its nose-thumbing title, Not Your Muse is an impressive engine, perfectly conceived and calibrated to conquer airwaves around the world, and audiences too. From Strange's skin-tight tenderness to the old-school sixties throwback Love is Back, to the party number Tonight Tonight, all the ingredients are there to make this album a must-have for years to come. © Yan Céh/Qobuz
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Pop - Released August 21, 2020 | All Saints Records

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Pop - Released March 6, 2020 | Universal Music Distribution Deal

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Pop - Released January 17, 2020 | Elefant Records

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A talented songwriter, the American pop/soul singer (who relocated to the UK) A Girl Called Eddy aka Erin Moran made waves back in 2004 with her eponymous album produced by Richard Hawley. In 2018, she graced the studio once more, as The Last Detail, a project she formed with the marvellous musician and artist Mehdi Zannad. It’s only in 2020, sixteen years later, that she is releasing her second solo project Been Around. This (very) prolonged absence is referred to from the first song, as a mysterious voice asks: “Girl, where you been?” “I’ve always been a huge fan of Burt Bacharach”: this testament by Erin Moran is one of the first points of reference of an album where the melodic sophistication and harmonic complexity indeed remind the listener of the golden years of the legendary composer (The Look of Love and Walk On By). The complex melody of Charity Shop Window and the lyrics of Someone Gonna Break Your Heart resound like postmodern echos of the hits of the composer and his lyricist Hal David. There are some more clear Bacharach influences, like the orchestration which is simultaneously original but also suave, able to get even the most uptight listeners moving. In this vein, some highlights include the vocal harmonies of Big Mouth, the harmonica solo in Been Around and the fantastic piano/guitar/harpsichord combo of Finest Actor. There tends to be a constant underlying coat of placid and discreet strings, that never dare to swagger (Pale Blue Moon). Admittedly, the homage occasionally skirts parody in some cases, but overall the project remains magical thanks to the enchanting voice of the girl called Eddy. Paul McCartney appears to be the other great idol of the songstress, as certain melodic inflections point out in the chorus of Lucy Jack or of Two Hearts. The influences are plain for all to see on Been Around, but they dance around the listener’s ears with subtlety over the course of this album which dives right into the heart of the 1960s and 70s. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 8, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Showcasing the best of their extensive catalog, Past Tense: The Best of Sparks compiles the greatest-loved tracks from the band's 50-year career. Including rare early recordings of songs like "Computer Girl" and "Piss Off," as well as iconic hits such as "When Do I Get to Sing 'My Way'," the collection was released in November 2019. © David Crone /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 20, 2019 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzissime
Everyone likes a bit of soul and old-school funk! Successors to Curtis Mayfield, Al Green, Prince, Sly Stone et al are born every day. But more often than not, interest in the genre is lacking… In only two albums, the band Alabama Shakes have displayed an original and torrid take on southern garage funk. Their secret ingredient? Brittany Howard, the band’s singer of enormous character and gravitas. Such a sense of charisma is all-the-more present in this shock debut solo album. The record holds onto some of Alabama Shakes’ merits but also delivers a more atypical, less conventional feeling. Howard makes our heads spin with this psychedelic and trippy funk record that verges on the experimental with tracks such as the opening History Repeats with lively guitars, stumbling rhythms and chaotic vocals. The Athens native is joined by limited backing musicians that compose of Zac Cockrell, the bassist for Alabama Shakes, and two prevalent, unique jazzmen, Robert Glasper on piano and keys and Nate Smith on drums. On top of this rich yet minimalist backdrop, Howard weaves in a study of both herself and her contemporaries. Everything is here! Homosexuality (Georgia), death (the album’s title, Jaime, is the name of her older sister who was lost to cancer at the age of 13 when Howard was only 8), religion (He Loves Me) and the racism that she, the daughter of a white mother and black father, has often encountered (Goat Head relates to the morning when her mother found all four tires of her car slashed and the severed head of a goat on the garden bench). You will be left shaken after listening to this exciting and very personal record. Howard’s values, references and influences (Prince, Curtis and Sly) are clearly heard – or so it seems – but the end result is one of great originality. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 6, 2019 | tôt Ou tard

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Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | Verve Forecast

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The American dream is an inexhaustible subject. It is approached head-on, sideways, from behind, above and below. It is the ultimate fuel for hordes of songwriters; even when they weren’t even born in America. As is the case for J.S. Ondara. This young Kenyan, who his label calls "the link between Tracy Chapman and Michael Kiwanuka" (an easy claim but not wrong), went there to try his luck. In 2013, Ondara dropped anchor at his aunt's house in Minneapolis. Having only previously known his native Nairobi, the musician took his songs into bars, clubs and even out onto the street, equipped with only his voice and a simple acoustic guitar, perhaps in the hope of becoming a third millennium Bob Dylan. The Dylan of The Freewheelin', his favourite record; Springsteen's Nebraska also being one of his top picks... But to limit himself to cloning those giants wouldn’t be very interesting. And Tales of America avoids that. First of all, J.S. Ondara has his own voice. His plaintive tone is a little androgynous and makes him truly unique. On the instrumental side, he adds some more daring flavours with the help of the great Andrew Bird, Griffin Goldsmith from Dawes and Joey Ryan from the Milk Carton Kids duo. In a divided America and a crisis-riddled world, J. S. Ondara's songs are more than just bandages, they’re powerful balms that penetrate the skin and warm the heart. This is a Qobuzissime that we needed... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Elea

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Pop - Released March 17, 2017 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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After Lloyd Cole split with his band the Commotions, he fulfilled his dream to move to New York City, where he hooked up with a new team of musicians and launched his solo career. It was a bumpy ride, full of highlights, disappointments, and ultimately a string of really good records, both released and unreleased at the time. Lloyd Cole in New York: Collected Recordings 1988-1996 contains the four albums he released during this timeframe (1990's Lloyd Cole, 1991's Don't Get Weird on Me Babe, 1993's Bad Vibes, 1995's Love Story); an album recorded in 1996 and never released (though all of the songs turned up later on Etc. or The Negatives); and -- most excitingly for Cole collectors -- a disc with 20 demos, many never heard before by anyone other than the musicians involved. It's fascinating to trace Cole's winding path, and reading the compelling essay throws new light on many of the recordings, as those involved aren't shy about telling some tough truths. Musically, the collection jumps from the slick rock & roll of Lloyd Cole with its angular Robert Quine guitar solos to Don't Get Weird, with one side of orchestrally scored songs and one with some of his catchiest pop songs showing some artistic vision. The leap from that rich sound to the very modern, sometime cheesy synthesized sound of Bad Vibes was a disappointment for Cole fans at the time, and remains one years later. As the next album proved very clearly, Cole is at his best when surrounded by woody warmth and guitar jangle. Sporting some of his most relaxed and peaceful songs yet, Love Story even took Cole back into the singles chart with the lilting "Like Lovers Do." It wasn't enough of a hit to keep the execs from shutting down Cole's next album, though. Titled Smile If You Want To here, the 1996 sessions were of a piece with those from Love Story, with Cole sounding assured and writing some of his best songs yet. It's a pity it was shelved at the time, but having all the songs together in one place makes for one of his strongest albums and the best part of the box set. The collected demos are the other huge selling point of the set. Recorded between 1989 and 1994, many of the songs didn't make the cut at the time, but it's hard to tell why. Mixed in with versions of songs that did make it onto albums, and his cover of Nick Cave's "The Ship Song," there are quite a few hidden gems. Some tracks have Lloyd trying things he didn't really explore further, like the jaunty pop-with-synths of "The English Weather," while some of them, like the Roy Orbison-sounding "Cold Empty Room," are just really good songs. It's a fine capper to a truly deluxe set that does justice to Cole's early solo career and makes it easy to rediscover the gentle genius of a sometimes overlooked singer/songwriter. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | Nonesuch

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Pop - Released April 13, 2015 | Universal Music Division Barclay

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Pop - Released November 11, 2014 | Universal Music Spain S.L.

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Pop - Released October 7, 2014 | Happy Mel Boopy Touring Co., Inc.

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Pop - Released April 25, 2014 | Nonesuch

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Pop - Released September 23, 2013 | Beating Drum

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Pop - Released May 17, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles Rock and Folk - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Nearly eight years after Rosanne Cash last released a set of original songs, 2014's The River & the Thread finds her in a reflective mood, and just as 2009's The List saw her looking back with a set of classic songs recommended by her father, the late country legend Johnny Cash, The River & the Thread is dominated by thoughts and emotions that occurred to her as she was involved in a project to restore Johnny's boyhood home. This doesn't mean that Cash has returned to the spunky, country-accented sound of her most popular work -- this is still Rosanne Cash the mature and thoughtful singer/songwriter we've come to know since the late '90s, and the tone of this album is unfailingly literate. But though this music isn't country, it's certainly Southern, and road trips from Alabama to Tennessee, visits to the Tallahatchie Bridge and Money Street, and vintage gospel music on the radio embroider these songs as Cash immerses herself in the places that were once close to home as if she's reuniting with long lost family. And two of the songs cut especially close to home -- "Etta's Tune" was written in memory of Marshall Grant, a longtime family friend and member of Johnny Cash's band, while "When the Master Calls the Roll" is a tale of love torn apart during the Civil War that Cash wrote in collaboration with her former husband Rodney Crowell and current spouse John Leventhal -- and they rank with the best material on the album, genuine and heartfelt, and written and performed with a genuine passion that never sinks into sentimental histrionics. Just as Cash's songs are crafted with a subtle intelligence, her vocals here are superb, getting to the heart of the lyrics without painting herself into a corner, and the production is rich but elegant and to the point. Rosanne Cash hasn't been especially prolific in the 21st century, and at under 40 minutes, she wasn't crafting an epic with The River & the Thread. But she's learned to make every word and every note count, and this album confirms once again that she's matured into a singular artist with the talent and the vision to make these stories of her travels in the South come to vivid and affecting life. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Nearly eight years after Rosanne Cash last released a set of original songs, 2014's The River & the Thread finds her in a reflective mood, and just as 2009's The List saw her looking back with a set of classic songs recommended by her father, the late country legend Johnny Cash, The River & the Thread is dominated by thoughts and emotions that occurred to her as she was involved in a project to restore Johnny's boyhood home. This doesn't mean that Cash has returned to the spunky, country-accented sound of her most popular work -- this is still Rosanne Cash the mature and thoughtful singer/songwriter we've come to know since the late '90s, and the tone of this album is unfailingly literate. But though this music isn't country, it's certainly Southern, and road trips from Alabama to Tennessee, visits to the Tallahatchie Bridge and Money Street, and vintage gospel music on the radio embroider these songs as Cash immerses herself in the places that were once close to home as if she's reuniting with long lost family. And two of the songs cut especially close to home -- "Etta's Tune" was written in memory of Marshall Grant, a longtime family friend and member of Johnny Cash's band, while "When the Master Calls the Roll" is a tale of love torn apart during the Civil War that Cash wrote in collaboration with her former husband Rodney Crowell and current spouse John Leventhal -- and they rank with the best material on the album, genuine and heartfelt, and written and performed with a genuine passion that never sinks into sentimental histrionics. Just as Cash's songs are crafted with a subtle intelligence, her vocals here are superb, getting to the heart of the lyrics without painting herself into a corner, and the production is rich but elegant and to the point. Rosanne Cash hasn't been especially prolific in the 21st century, and at under 40 minutes, she wasn't crafting an epic with The River & the Thread. But she's learned to make every word and every note count, and this album confirms once again that she's matured into a singular artist with the talent and the vision to make these stories of her travels in the South come to vivid and affecting life. © Mark Deming /TiVo

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