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Chamber Music - Released April 24, 2020 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
At the height of mental and physical pain, Schubert wrote Octet in F major in 1824, recalling the Septet, Op. 20 composed by Beethoven at about the same age. Their age gap meant that Beethoven opened the Classical age and Schubert the Romantic age. Schubert was composing his first works while Beethoven already had many masterpieces behind him. Played for the first time during a concert in homage to Beethoven who had just passed away, this marvellous Octet didn’t find its way to an editor at the time. It was found to be too long (62 minutes here, respecting all the repeats!) and was forgotten until its first complete edition in 1861 when it was admired by Brahms. During the String Quintet written four years later, the Octet alternates (as so often happens with Schubert) between moments of Viennese grace and deep melancholy. The Modigliani Quartet give a magnificent performance with experienced musicians including clarinettist Sabine Meyer, who showcases her incredibly expressive playing in the sublime Adagio, a true lullaby opening up to the next world that poor Schubert was awaiting in his early thirties. Bruno Schneider on horn, Dag Jensen on bassoon and Knut Erik Sundquist on double bass complete this ensemble of superb musicians giving Schubert a tender and fraternal humanity. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released March 20, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Before Versailles, the epicentre of power in the Kingdom of France was the Louvre, a genuine theatre of ceremonies where music was duty-bound to impress with its magnificence. In the reign of Louis XIII, the air de cour and ballet mobilised the elite of composers such as Moulinié, Guédron and Chancy. The most famous of them, Boesset, guided the polyphonic air inherited from the Renaissance towards a more intimate conception: before the sumptuous splendours to come in the shadow of the Sun King. It is a rich array of delicately chiselled miniatures that the combined talents of the Ensemble Correspondances give us the opportunity to hear today. © Harmonia mundi
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Solo Piano - Released February 7, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
French pianist Adam Laloum is joining prestigious label harmonia mundi for a new album dedicated to Schubert. The album is an example of this young artist’s attractiveness. Laloum makes his piano sing and offers an intensely melancholic poetic vision with a personal and smooth touch. Lesser known than Schubert’s last three sonatas, the Sonata in G major, D. 894 is one of the few pieces published when the composer was still alive. Schumann saw it as his most perfect work and Liszt loved it. The Sonata in C minor, D. 958 was edited ten years after Schubert’s death. It was composed in the fall of 1928, a few weeks before the musician’s death from syphilis. The piece is infused with Schubert’s doubts, demons and fear of his upcoming death. Adam Laloum wonderfully translates the fraternal spirit of dear Franz Schubert, who almost seems to apologize for the piece’s severity, by adding glimpses of bright recklessness or fatalism. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Duets - Released January 17, 2020 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Solo Piano - Released January 17, 2020 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
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Trios - Released November 29, 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released September 20, 2019 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Duets - Released August 23, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
Whatever it takes, so long as it sounds remarkable. A viola da gamba composition played on a viola da braccia, or Bratsche in German. Such feats are commonplace for Antoine Tamestit, and here he overcomes the challenge with the same sense of indulgence that we have come to expect. In fact, the musician is an expert in adapting baroque classics. Tamestit transcribes compositions with tactfulness and intelligence, like in his two Suites for Solo Cello by Jean-Sébastien Bach. This time, the viola player is accompanied by his accomplice Masato Suzuki on harpsichord for the recording of the Three Sonatas for viola da gamba, BMV 1027-1029. Playing the music we like on an instrument we love, isn’t that what taking pleasure in music is about? There are incidentally several versions of the Sonata in G major, BMV 1027: a trio sonata of two transverse flutes and perhaps even an organ. So why not the viola? The record contains three scores in reverse order to their catalogue numbers. It’s a pleasure to hear the Vivace under the viola players agile fingers and ductile phrasing. The instrument’s grain is warmly transferred through his bow thanks to his natural approach to playing. The balance between the two musicians is a delight, particularly in the arrangement of the aria “Ergiesse dich reichlich” of the cantata Wo sol ich flihen hin, a pleasant surprise that is slipped in between sonatas BMV 1029 and 1028. The melody is fluidly transferred between the players and demonstrates the complexity of the composition’s exceptional contrasts. Of course, the viola provides a larger ambitus with seven strings and its ability to play deeper notes. Tamestit and Suzuki deliver here a disarmingly graceful rendition that lacks no gravity. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released May 3, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released April 26, 2019 | Audax Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
Ensemble Diderot continues to explore the development and dissemination of the trio sonata in baroque Europe with this exciting new release. Entirely dedicated to works from the era after Lully’s death, this album celebrates the newly found freedom at the time when composers started to combine French style with transalpine ardour. Johannes Pramsohler and his musicians bring their usual precision, passion and energy to this programme packed with new discoveries. © Audax
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Chamber Music - Released April 12, 2019 | NoMadMusic

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
A is for “Amadeus,” and a recording which marks a return to the source for Quatuor Zaïde, who dedicate their fourth collection to the genius Austrian composer. Z is for Zaïde, a “Singspiel” by Mozart in the style of Die Zauberflöte, which historical transcription for string quartet is a world premiere! Paired with the Quartet in G Major, No. 14, K. 387, this miniature version of one of the most famous operas repeatedly casts each instrument of the quartet in a multitude of lyric roles, celebrating the eternal dialogue between singing and playing. © Nomadmusic
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Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Fuga Libera

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
"Masques", the title of this album, is a reference to Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet; it mirrors his visionary music, so full of wit, colour and drama, that expresses every possible human emotion. The thousand characters created by the music are both actors in and spectators of their own lives by turns. The Violin Sonata No. 1 is a truly epic work; it leads us from an anguish-laden grief permeated with a gust of wind from the grave to a nostalgic lyricism — the memory of a lost paradise? — that is then driven by tremendous rhythmic energy to the apocalyptic climax of the work: we experience an explosion, a dissolution of every hope, before a return to the frozen whiteness of the beginning and an ending in resignation. The Sonata No. 2, unrestrainedly lyrical and punctuated with humour, can be seen as a contrasting counterpart to the previous work. This album also includes the undervalued Sonata for solo violin and two miniatures in Prokofiev’s characteristic style: they are filled with alacrity, humour and biting wit — an extract of life ! © Fuga Libera
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Chamber Music - Released March 15, 2019 | Fuga Libera

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This fruitful “encounter” between Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel juxtaposes Bernstein’s intensity and rhythmic vitality with the melancholy refinement of Ravel’s colours, while also highlighting the composers’ commonalities, such as a shared tonal language and masterful incorporation of jazz idioms. Our purpose, however, is not only to appreciate an artistic cross-exchange but also to build upon it. This is what Trio Zadig and Benjamin Attahir seek in Asfar, a new work that springs from the creative nexus of these 20th-century giants and continues the conversation. © Outhere Music
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Solo Piano - Released February 22, 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Duets - Released February 8, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Despite (or because of) composing some twenty-seven symphonies, Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950) has practically been forgotten about. He was a student of Liadov and Rimsky-Korsakov and a friend of Prokofiev, but he never ventured far from his romantic style of writing even when it was fading in popularity. Despite this, he was a fantastic composer of instrumental music, as demonstrated by this First Sonata composed in 1911 which has since been revised several times. Its lyricism is perfectly suited to the cello’s rich sound that is so close to the human voice. As a finalist of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Belgium, special prize winner at the Tchaikovsy Competition in Moscow and ADAMI Classical Musical Talent in Paris, Bruno Philippe has amassed a whole host of prizes and awards, but it is a desire to play music that motivates him rather than a desire for recognition. After an initial project dedicated to Brahms’ two Sonatas, he signed with Harmonia Mundi and released an album dedicated to Beethoven and Schubert. Here, he explores the work of Myaskovsky with pianist and composer Jérôme Ducros, however most of this new recording is dedicated to Rachmaninov and includes two of his early pieces, Prelude and Oriental Dance and the famous Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor. As an added bonus Prelude in C sharp minor is also included, a piece which Jérôme Ducros clearly enjoys playing and which we certainly enjoy listening to. This piece was one of the main reasons for the composer’s worldwide fame even though it was unexpected and he would have been grateful just for some public recognition for his symphonies. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released February 1, 2019 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released January 25, 2019 | B Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Trios - Released January 18, 2019 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released January 11, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Igor Levit moved from Russia to Germany when he was eight, but there's still a lot of Russian in his outlook: an attraction to the pure virtuoso tradition, and a tendency toward big statements and the big questions. Nowhere has this been more true than on Life, an album that succeeds both thematically and as a thrilling embodiment of late-Romantic pianism at its best. The title, and the contents, refer to the album's memorial function: Levit chose the program to honor a close artist friend who died in an accident. The music is monumental enough to live up to its death-haunted theme, rising out of silence in the Fantasia after J.S. Bach of Busoni and continuing with a remarkably sustained mood of soberness and dignity, punctuated by frenetic outbursts. Busoni is one major presence on the program; the other is Liszt, and the two come together in the Busoni transcription of the Fantasy and Fugue on the Chorale Ad nos, ad salutarem undam of Liszt, originally for organ and an impressive virtuoso task on the piano. So the program works well also as a revival of pure late-Romantic pianism: you can easily imagine that Liszt would have loved this, and loved to play it. A third theme interweaving the works on the program is that of reinterpretation, as in the Brahms transcription of the Chaconne from the Bach Partita for solo violin in D minor, BWV 1004; the fact that Levit has played these works in different orderings in recital testifies to the program's remarkable cohesiveness. There is music by Frederic Rzewski in a memorial vein, and Bill Evans' serene Peace Piece is a lovely conclusion. Bravo! © TiVo

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Chamber Music in the magazine