Albums

147099 albums sorted by Bestsellers and filtered by Jazz
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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | ECM

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His talent is huge but it never brought him to mainstream success. Yet, Dominic Miller is one of the most brilliant guitarists of his generation. Guitar aficionados certainly know him from his work with Sting, among other collaborations. Born in Argentina in 1960 of an American father and an Irish mother, Dominic Miller grew up in the US and lived in the UK as a student. Throughout his career, he has collaborated with many stars, including Paul Simon, the Chieftains, Rod Stewart, Bryan Adams, Phil Collins, Sheryl Crow, Peter Gabriel and Plácido Domingo. His debut album Silent Light, was released in 2017 on the ECM label. For this evocative and refined record Miller was solo on the guitar with the only support of Miles Bould’s elegant percussion. Two years later, with Absinthe, he teamed up with Santiago Arias on the bandoneon, Mike Lindup on keys, Nicolas Fiszman on bass and Manu Katché on drums. “The first thing that came to me, even before any songs on the record, was the album title. I live in the South of France and I am fascinated with impressionism. I enjoy the grazing and enchanting lights that the wind creates and I understand how their combination with high alcohol led many of impressionism’s representatives to madness. Hence its green skies, its blue faces and its distorted perspectives”. Along with his quintet, Dominic Miller never tries to recreate with music and sound the paintings of Renoir, Cézanne, Monet or Manet. Rather, what he does is to develop an intense yet soft lyricism. His nylon and steel strings guitars intertwined with Arias’ bandoneon reach a transcendent space. This alluring album is both original and captivating. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | ACT Music

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As pianist Joachim Kühn mentions in the album’s sleeve notes, he gave sixteen concerts with the great saxophonist Ornette Coleman between 1995 and 2000. “Before each concert, Ornette wrote ten new songs, which we would work out and record in his Harmolodic studio in Harlem for a week. Since he wanted me to supply the chords (sounds) for his melodies, I was directly involved in the composition process. After the concert, these pieces were never played again. Now I am the only one who has all the recordings and the sheet music of the 170 pieces. So now, after about twenty years, I have reassembled and recorded them for solo piano. Apart from Lonely Woman, none of these pieces were ever released by Ornette Coleman.” This fascinating collection helped Kühn author a high-class solo album. At 75 years old, he has added some of the free-jazz diktats to his repertoire and is now armed with a rather broad range of shades. He approaches this aptly titled Melodic Ornette Coleman without disrupting the narrative or melodic weave. And because this is Joachim Kühn, the improvisations are anything but plain. In his most melancholic moments, the German pianist still unveils harrowing facets of his musical personality. Superb! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 15, 2019 | ACT Music

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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | ECM

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His talent is huge but it never brought him to mainstream success. Yet, Dominic Miller is one of the most brilliant guitarists of his generation. Guitar aficionados certainly know him from his work with Sting, among other collaborations. Born in Argentina in 1960 of an American father and an Irish mother, Dominic Miller grew up in the US and lived in the UK as a student. Throughout his career, he has collaborated with many stars, including Paul Simon, the Chieftains, Rod Stewart, Bryan Adams, Phil Collins, Sheryl Crow, Peter Gabriel and Plácido Domingo. His debut album Silent Light, was released in 2017 on the ECM label. For this evocative and refined record Miller was solo on the guitar with the only support of Miles Bould’s elegant percussion. Two years later, with Absinthe, he teamed up with Santiago Arias on the bandoneon, Mike Lindup on keys, Nicolas Fiszman on bass and Manu Katché on drums. “The first thing that came to me, even before any songs on the record, was the album title. I live in the South of France and I am fascinated with impressionism. I enjoy the grazing and enchanting lights that the wind creates and I understand how their combination with high alcohol led many of impressionism’s representatives to madness. Hence its green skies, its blue faces and its distorted perspectives”. Along with his quintet, Dominic Miller never tries to recreate with music and sound the paintings of Renoir, Cézanne, Monet or Manet. Rather, what he does is to develop an intense yet soft lyricism. His nylon and steel strings guitars intertwined with Arias’ bandoneon reach a transcendent space. This alluring album is both original and captivating. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | WM Germany

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With his knack for composing unique narratives and his flawless harmonic precision, Omer Klein really comes into his own in trios. His jazz is usually intertwined with traditional folk music, as is often the case for Israeli jazz musicians. The Germany-based pianist slides from melancholic sounds towards swinging grooves. This former student of Danilo Perez and John Zorn signs here a kind of love letter to the Mediterranean with the aptly named Radio Mediteran. With the help of his faithful rhythmic section composed of Haggai Cohen Milo on double bass and Amir Bresler on drums, he submerges his compositions in sounds from Tunisia, Bulgaria, Turkey, the Middle East, Libya, Morocco and other Mediterranean countries. “My band and I have a very personal connection to the Mediterranean Sea, as we all grew up close to it. After a concert, Haggai, Amir and I often listen to music together in the hotel. During our “Sleepwalkers” tour I noticed that most of the music we were playing to each other was from North Africa, the Balkans or the Arab world. This realisation was the starting point for Radio Mediteran. ” Straying off the beaten track, Radio Mediteran is no folkloric album. “I didn't want to copy the music. Instead we tried to absorb it and give it a new, personal context in order to ultimately perhaps even create a new genre.” These three men have an extraordinary ability to demonstrate that there are more things that connect us than divide us. “This is my political message,” insists Omer Klein. “Our history shows that different cultures in the Mediterranean have positively influenced and enriched each other.” His trio even adds a pop element to his music with some analogue synthesizers and percussion. This generation of jazz musicians are constantly breaking down borders without ever totally cutting ties from their roots. With that philosophy in the back of his mind, Klein’s album proves a real success. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Für das dritte, beim Label Mack Avenue erscheinende Album, hatte sich der Gitarrist Julian Lage mit seinem Trioneue Weggefährten ausgesucht, nämlich den Kontrabassisten Jorge Roeder und den Schlagzeuger der The Bad Plus, Dave King. Das ehemalige Wunderkind aus Kalifornien lebt heute in New York. Hier bietet der nunmehr 31-Jährige Neuinterpretationen aus einem recht vielseitigen Repertoire und damit ein erquickliches Panorama amerikanischer Komponisten des 20. Jahrhunderts – aber nicht ausschließlich Jazzkomponisten. So begegnet man auf Love Hurts Stücken von Roy Orbison aber auch von Ornette Coleman, Jimmy Giuffre, Peter Ivers oder Keith Jarrett. In seiner Kunst befasst sich Lage immer eingehender mit dieser elektrischen Variante, um einerseits Jazz, aber auch Blues und Rock'n'Roll miteinzubeziehen. Dieser Virtuose wandert mit dem Plektron in der Hand von einem Bekanntenkreis zum nächsten und er beherrscht seine Klassiker aus dem Effeff. Erst denkt man an den Stil eines Bill Frisell, aber dann gleitet er eher in Richtung Pat Metheny, bevor es etwas schlichter wird und Erinnerungen an Jim Hall auftauchen. Mehr noch als auf seinen vorangegangenen Platten räumt der Gitarrist nicht nur mit allerlei Einflüssen auf, sondern er beweist nun einen für ihn recht typischen Stil anhand von eigenen, oft recht gewagten Improvisationen. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 15, 2019 | Impulse!

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Saxophonist and clarinetist Shabaka Hutchings is a real connoisseur of sounds and fusions, and a true explorer. Each of his new musical expeditions pushes him further towards the top of today’s jazz scene… Born in London in 1984, he grew up under the Barbadian sun before moving back to England in 1999 where he joined the prestigious Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Here, he caught the attention of saxophonist Soweto Kinch and started hanging out with big names like Courtney Pine and Jerry Dammers from the Specials. In 2011, Shabaka launched Sons of Kemet, a surprising quartet featuring a tuba and two drums. A complete oddity, halfway between a marching band and a chamber orchestra, that blends jazz, Caribbean and African music, Egyptian influences, and flavours from New Orleans and Ethiopia. The aptly titled The Comet Is Coming – no relations to Sons Of Kemet – is another adaptation of jazz language. But does it still qualify as jazz? It doesn’t really matter. As a sort of electro-drip-fed Sun Ra of the third millennium, Shabaka Hutchings – who calls himself King Shabaka here – is supported by a duo composed of Danalogue on the keyboards and Betamax on drums and percussions. It’s a rather avant-garde programme set to overpowered percussive rhythmic and hypnotising brass improvisations. Sun Ra, as we said… It’s hard not to mention him who was idolised (or hated) for his lengthy compositions and mind-blowing, almost psychedelic performances as well as for the odd cosmic philosophy he preached. The Comet is Coming’s second album, Trust In The Lifeforce Of The Deep Mystery, remains profoundly attached to its time, in which Shabaka injects his philosophy with contemporary elements far removed from master Ra’s semantic like when he hands over the microphone to rapper/spoken-word performer Kate Tempest on Blood Of The Past. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | ACT Music

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Jazz - Released February 15, 2019 | ECM

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Solo double bass albums are few and far between. Those who have dared to venture into the barren territories are mostly adventurous jazzmen: Barre Phillips, Joëlle Léandre, Malachi Favors, Alan Silva, William Parker, Dave Holland, Michael Formanek, Miroslav Vitous, Ron Carter, Eberhard Weber, Henri Texier, Renaud Garcia-Fons, Jonas Hellborg and so on. The American musician Larry Grenadier has played with famous names such as Paul Motian or Pat Metheny, though most will know him for his work from the 25 years that he spent in Brad Mehldau’s Trio. Recorded at Avatar Studios in New York and produced by Manfred Eicher from ECM, The Gleaners is the result of introspection. "The process for making this record began with a look inward, an excavation into the core elements of who I am as a bass player", writes Grenadier in the cover notes. "It was a search for a center of sound and timbre, for the threads of harmony and rhythm that formulate the crux of a musical identity." He adds that it was originally Eicher’s idea, being a trained bassist himself. "Few people truly know how to treat the double bass sonically in the studio, but Manfred concentrates on bringing out its special qualities. In making The Gleaners, he was important in the editing and the mix, really helping me to shape the album." Larry Grenadier uses several techniques and tunings here to make the record come alive and offers up a vast sound palette. With seven original compositions (including one, Pettiford, which is dedicated to the double bassist Oscar Pettiford, his childhood idol), a cover of Gershwin's My Man's Gone Now and a medley of John Coltrane's Compassion and Paul Motian's The Owl of Cranston, The Gleaners displays a rather wide array of emotions and is beautifully unique. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 22, 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | Okeh - Sony Masterworks

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Last century, in the mid-eighties to be precise, Branford Marsalis and his brother Wynton were at the forefront of a new wave of post-bebop virtuosos. Dressed in Armani suits, their music was hugely successful. Some of the top performers in the jazz world criticised these youngsters for their approach, viewing it as regressive, backward-looking and even conservative. Back then, Wynton was the more orthodox player while Branford was the “cool guy”, largely thanks to Buckshot LeFonque, his 1994 project that mixed jazz, rap and R&B, and his work with DJ Premier from Gang Starr... Since then, this Battle of Hernani has been long forgotten and each of the Marsalis brothers has been left to develop their musical style in peace. Branford has even dared to be... daring! In 2014, for instance, he performed solo in Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, playing compositions by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Steve Lacy. Two years later, he collaborated with the singer Kurt Elling on the album Upward Spiral. And here on this record, we find those same artists who supported him in 2016: pianist Joey Calderazzo, bassist Eric Revis and drummer Justin Faulkner. The Secret Between the Shadow and the Soul reveals a 58-year-old musician who’s completely free. An artist who plays for himself and those who accompany him. No matter the style or the mood... Rarely has Branford's playing seemed so inspired, so adventurous, so... beautiful? Throughout the hard bop themes (Snake Hips Waltz by Andrew Hill), the atypical compositions (The Windup by Keith Jarrett) and his own compositions, he releases improvisations that are as breathtaking as they are accurate, with phrases that illustrate his lifelong commitment to music. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Following up his 2018 collaboration with Van Morrison, You're Driving Me Crazy, Joey DeFrancesco returns to his own work with his quartet on 2019's spiritually inspired In the Key of the Universe. Produced by DeFrancesco and his wife, Gloria, the album finds the organist tapping into the hypnotic, deeply soulful metaphysical jazz that artists like Pharoah Sanders, Don Cherry, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk further explored in the wake of spiritual jazz pioneer John Coltrane's death in 1967. In fact, DeFrancesco showcases Sanders here on three tracks. Joining them are several longtime associates including legendary drummer Billy Hart, saxophonist Troy Roberts, and percussionist Sammy Figueroa. At the core of the album is a heartfelt rendition of Sanders' "The Creator Has a Master Plan" off his classic 1969 album Karma, on which drummer Hart also appeared. Sanders also adds his flowing, emotive saxophone to the expansive, minor-toned title track, and the dusky afterglow grooves of "And So It Is." The latter also finds DeFrancesco playing trumpet, something he does several times on the album, evoking the burnished warmth and lyricism of mid-'60s Miles Davis. The tracks without Sanders are equally compelling, as DeFrancesco and his band dig into Middle Eastern-tinged blues on "Vibrations in Blue," dive deep into the flowing bop modality of "Awake and Blissed," and luxuriate in the sparkling soul balladry of "A Path Through the Noise." While DeFrancesco has always played with an earthy soulfulness, on In the Key of the Universe he elevates that soulfulness to a divine musical plane. ~ Matt Collar
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Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | ACT Music

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Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Album after album, Emile Parisien refines his self-portrait. He adds some shades. Erases others. And whatever the formation, context or repertoire, the saxophonist maintains his song, his voice and his own immediately identifiable style... Throughout his wide repertoire, the pieces that he has conceived with his quartet (for more than a decade) have always occupied a special place. With pianist Julien Touéry, double bassist Ivan Gélugne and, as a new recruit, drummer Julien Loutelier, Parisien leads this improvisation that touches on the sublime and is ever surprising. With his virtuosity he could have simply stuck to what is conventional. But that word doesn’t resonate with him. Every second of Double Screening explores new territories. He is one of the few saxophonists of his generation to alternate between lyricism and libertarianism in the snap of the finger. Going from laughter to tears is not a paradox in the universe of Emile Parisien's quartet. It is simply its raison d'être. And, in the end, a way to offer a type of jazz that is more organic than cerebral. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 20, 2019 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

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Jazz - Released February 22, 2019 | Parlophone France

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Jazz - Released December 12, 2018 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

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Vocal Jazz in the magazine