Albums

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Vocal Jazz - Released May 31, 2019 | Resonance Records

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Vocal Jazz - Released July 3, 2019 | Jazz Extension

Hi-Res
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 22, 2019 | nagel heyer records

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Vocal Jazz - Released May 1, 2019 | Mad Jazz records

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Vocal Jazz - Released May 27, 2019 | Fresh Sound Records

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Vocal Jazz - Released August 27, 2013 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Vocal Jazz - Released July 12, 2013 | Okeh - Sony Masterworks

Distinctions Découverte JAZZ NEWS
Branching away from standards on her second album Way Down Low, Austin-based jazz vocalist Kat Edmonson also expands her musical worldview, going beyond the sophisticated cabaret of her 2009 debut Take to the Sky and creating a breezy neo-tribute to the swinging '60s. That was the decade that produced Brian Wilson's "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times," one of the few covers on Way Down Low and a sentiment that applies to Edmonson but in a different way. Where the Beach Boy was pining for the days before rock & roll, Edmonson would certainly feel more comfortable in either the '60s or '50s, where bossa nova, swing, and pop mingled happily, as they do here. Certainly, these sounds give Way Down Low a distinctly retro vibe, but Edmonson isn't living in the past, she's pledging allegiance to a tradition, a tradition she finds flexible enough to refashion for modern times. And Kat Edmonson is a modern girl -- after all, she funded the production of Way Down Low via Kickstarter, a move that gave her artistic freedom and professional production, taking full advantage of those two elements. Way Down Low is rich and varied, as are Edmonson's girlish vocals, which never succumb to cloying sweetness or stereotypical scatting. She's nimble and creative within the boundaries of her chosen traditions, which is why Way Down Low feels simultaneously fresh and timeless. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Riverside

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
The ultra-hip and sophisticated "cool jazz" that Chet Baker (trumpet/vocals) helped define in the early '50s matured rapidly under the tutelage of producer Dick Bock. This can be traced to Baker's earliest sides on Bock's L.A.-based Pacific Jazz label. This album is the result of Baker's first sessions for the independent Riverside label. The Chet Baker Quartet featured on Chet Baker Sings: It Could Happen to You includes Kenny Drew (piano), Sam Jones (bass), and Philly Joe Jones (drums). (Performances by bassist George Morrow and drummer Dannie Richmond are featured on a few cuts.) This results in the successful combination of Baker's fluid and nonchalant West Coast delivery with the tight swinging accuracy of drummer Jones and pianist Drew. Nowhere is this balance better displayed than the opening and closing sides on the original album, "Do It the Hard Way" and "Old Devil Moon," respectively. One immediate distinction between these vocal sides and those recorded earlier in the decade for Pacific Jazz is the lissome quality of Baker's playing and, most notably, his increased capacity as a vocalist. The brilliant song selection certainly doesn't hurt either. This is an essential title in Chet Baker's 30-plus year canon. [Some reissues contain two bonus tracks, "I'm Old Fashioned" and "While My Lady Sleeps"]. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1957 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released September 30, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res
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Vocal Jazz - Released April 5, 1999 | RCA Victor

Les Double Six of Paris was a French Lambert, Hendricks & Ross -- times-two -- and the striking-looking singer/lyricist Mimi Perrin was their Jon Hendricks. They had a thicker, more intricately arranged texture, impeccable diction, a fine sense of swing and great taste, and this generously loaded CD gives you a good idea of their range with three different lineups of singers. Included here are several transcriptions from the Quincy Jones and Count Basie big bands, the combos of Miles Davis, Gerry Mulligan, Shelly Manne, and others from both genres. There is one unreleased track, a literal, at-length transcription of "Walkin'" à la Quincy Jones. Perrin's interpretation of John Coltrane's "Naima" is a spine-tingler; it must have been tough to nail the intervals of that melody and capture its soul as well. Though he does not take any featured solos, Ward Swingle would soon become the best-known expatriate of the group, going on to form the popular Swingle Singers. To the non-French speaker familiar with vocalese in English, there is something disconcertingly remote about many of these performances; the diction is so precise that you feel you're missing a lot of the fun. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1978 | Pablo

This set features the great Sarah Vaughan in a typically spontaneous Norman Granz production for Pablo with pianist Oscar Peterson, guitarist Joe Pass, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Louie Bellson. Sassy sounds wonderful stretching out on such songs as "Midnight Sun," "More Than You Know," "Teach Me Tonight," and "Body and Soul," among others. All ten of the melodies are veteran standards that she knew backwards but still greeted with enthusiasm. A very good example of late-period Sarah Vaughan. ~ Scott Yanow
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Concord Records

For her entry into the increasingly popular Great American Songbook subgenre, Diane Schuur de-emphasizes the vocal histrionics that in the past have come close to spoiling some of her recordings and maintains a steady, clear, exuberant tone. Good move: one of Schuur's gifts is her multi-octave range, but she has often over-relied on it at the expense of whatever song she was singing. Here, she takes to the classic compositions of George and Ira Gershwin, Rodgers & Hammerstein, Irving Berlin, and the like with a respectfulness and glee that allow her to frame and expose these culturally embedded lyrics and melodies without beating on them. If anything, Schuur is overly cautious at times -- there's a girl-like quality to her voice here that belies her 50-plus years, and she sometimes lays back where before she might have trampled. But she's clearly enjoying this repertoire; it's as if, by exploring these ancient tunes, she's discovered a fountain of youth along the way. Accompanied by longtime pianist Randy Porter, as well as guitarist Dan Balmer, bassist Scott Steed, and drummer Reggie Jackson, Schuur largely stays in a ballad-to-midtempo range on standards like "Blue Skies," "Nice Work If You Can Get It," "My Favorite Things," and Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne's "It's Magic." She's comfortable there, and the lack of a hurried pace allows her to utilize her still impressive range to get the most from the tunes without falling into the trap of milking them. ~ Jeff Tamarkin
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Vocal Jazz - Released April 17, 2000 | RCA Victor

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released December 8, 2014 | My Favorite Things

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Vocal Jazz - Released May 17, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Recorded at the Village Vanguard with a great quartet (including guest Kenny Burrell on guitar), Chris in Person finds vocal heavyweight Chris Connor showing an even better sense of chops and swing as on her studio dates. She gets off to a great start with the apt "Strike up the Band," torches her way through a few of her standards ("Lover Come Back to Me," "Angel Eyes," "'Round Midnight"), and shows she can swing in a soul groove with an ebullient cover of Ray Charles' "Hallelujah I Love Him So." Add in a pair of songs, "Poor Little Rich Girl" and "All About Ronnie," known best (if at all) as Chris Connor songs, and fans of the best cool singer of the '50s get a rich, dynamic live set showing Connor lighting up a crowd. ~ John Bush
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Vocal Jazz - Released October 20, 1958 | Capitol Records

Many of singer June Christy's popular Capitol albums feature her cool-toned vocals backed by an orchestra. This recording is an exception. Christy excels on a jazz-oriented set with a nonet that includes trumpeter Ed Leddy, trombonist Frank Rosolino and her husband Bob Cooper (who arranged the set) on tenor and oboe. Christy accurately called this music "intimate swing." Her versions of such songs as "I'm Glad There Is You," "My One and Only Love," "When Lights Are Low" and "Blue Moon" are tasteful, sincere and often quite memorable. ~ Scott Yanow
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 17, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Disques Meys

Genre

Vocal Jazz in the magazine