Albums

£3.19

Vocal Jazz - Released April 30, 1958 | Vintage Music

£7.89

Vocal Jazz - Released May 26, 1959 | Poppydisc

£2.39

Vocal Jazz - Released June 3, 1959 | Vintage Music

£3.19

Vocal Jazz - Released August 1, 1959 | Vintage Music

£3.19

Vocal Jazz - Released September 28, 1959 | Vintage Music

£4.79

Vocal Jazz - Released November 23, 1959 | Vintage Music

£17.49
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | Verve

Hi-Res
£7.99

Vocal Jazz - Released August 22, 1966 | Sähkö Recordings

Booklet
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
£13.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Blue Note Records

Bobby McFerrin is heard in prime form throughout this date, which was the follow-up to his classic The Voice. A few of the numbers are taken unaccompanied, and these include memorable renditions of "Thinkin' About Your Body," "I Hear Music," and "Mañana Iguana." Pianist Herbie Hancock duets with McFerrin on "Turtle Shoes"; "Another Night in Tunisia" (taken from the Manhattan Transfer's Vocalese album) features McFerrin with the vocal quartet and Jon Hendricks; soprano saxophonist Wayne Shorter interacts with the vocalist on "Walkin'"; and an eccentric "Beverly Hills Blues" has "assistance" from comedian Robin Williams. A continually intriguing release with plenty of wit from the innovative singer. ~ Scott Yanow
£11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | GRP

This CD features a logical combination: singer Diane Schuur with the Count Basie big band. In what would be longtime rhythm guitarist Freddie Green's final performance, Schuur and the Basie ghost band (under the direction of Frank Foster) perform material that includes her standards (such as "Deedles' Blues" and "Climbing Higher Mountains"), Dave Brubeck's "Travlin' Blues" and the Joe Williams-associated "Everyday I Have The Blues." Unfortunately, the Basie band is mostly used in accompaniment without any significant solos, but Schuur sounds quite comfortable in this format and her voice is in prime form. ~ Scott Yanow
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | RCA Bluebird

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Carmen McRae, a good friend of Thelonious Monk, sang 13 of his songs (two of which are also heard in different live versions) on this memorable project. Half of the lyrics are by Jon Hendricks, while the remainder were written by Abbey Lincoln ("Blue Monk"), Bernie Hanighen, Sally Swisher, or Mike Ferro. On all but the two concert performances, McRae is assisted by tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan, pianist Eric Gunnison, bassist George Mraz, and drummer Al Foster; Mraz's solos are particularly impressive, although everyone is in sensitive form. The live recordings give listeners two more chances to acknowledge the uniqueness of tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse's tone. As for McRae, her phrasing has rarely sounded better than on this classic set, and it is a particular pleasure to hear her interpret the intelligent lyrics and unusual melodies. "Dear Ruby" ("Ruby, My Dear") and "Listen to Monk" ("Rhythm-A-Ning") are among the high points of the essential and very delightful CD. An inspired idea and one of the best recordings of Carmen McRae's career. ~ Scott Yanow
£11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Parlophone Catalogue

This CD will always be remembered for including Bobby McFerrin's surprise hit "Don't Worry, Be Happy." Actually, overall, this album is not quite up to the level of his previous two, for instead of taking unaccompanied vocals, the remarkable singer overdubbed his voice many times, which reduces the miraculous nature of his talents. However, McFerrin's renditions of "Drive My Car," "Drive," and "Sunshine of Your Love" (the program is quite diverse), plus the catchy "Don't Worry," are generally unique and worth hearing. ~ Scott Yanow
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Pacific Jazz

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
£14.49

Vocal Jazz - Released November 15, 1988 | Columbia

£11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
To much of the pop (as opposed to the jazz) audience, Chet Baker was known not as an able cool jazz trumpeter, but as a romantic balladeer. The two classifications were not mutually exclusive; Baker's vocal numbers would also feature his trumpet playing, as well as fine instrumental support from West Coast cool jazzers. For those who prefer the vocal side of the Baker canon, this is an excellent compilation of his best vintage material in that mode. The 20 tracks draw from sessions covering the era when he was generally conceded to be at his vocal peak (1953-1956), and are dominated by standards from the likes of Rodgers & Hart, Carmichael, Gershwin, and Kern. Baker's singing was white and naïve in the best senses, with a quavering, uncertain earnestness that embodied a certain (safe) strain of mid-'50s bohemianism. That's the Baker heard on this collection, which contains some his most famous interpretations, including "My Funny Valentine," "Time After Time," "There Will Never Be Another You," and "Let's Get Lost." ~ Richie Unterberger
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Verve

Shirley Horn's second Verve recording consolidated the success that she had had with her previous release, I Thought About You, and resulted in her gaining a large audience for her ballad vocals and solid jazz piano playing. Performing with her usual trio (which includes bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams) and guest tenor Buck Hill on five of the 13 tracks, Horn is heard in definitive form throughout these studio sessions. Highlights include "Beautiful Friendship," "Baby, Baby All the Time," "This Can't Be Love," "I Wanna Be Loved," "But Beautiful," "Get out of Town," and "It Could Happen to You." ~ Scott Yanow
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Verve

Other than a pair of sessions for the French Barclay label during 1955-1956, this set (which has been reissued on CD) has pianist-vocalist Blossom Dearie's first recordings as a leader. Teamed up with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Jo Jones, Dearie is heard in her early prime. Although her voice has always been an acquired taste, its sincerity and sense of swing wins one over after a few songs and Dearie's piano playing is first class. In addition to the 14 original selections (mostly swing-era standards plus a couple of French songs), there are three previously unreleased numbers including "Blossom's Blues," which dates from 1959. This CD is the perfect introduction for listeners to the unique sound of Blossom Dearie. ~ Scott Yanow
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released March 19, 1990 | Verve

For this 1958 LP, Anita O'Day sings standards associated with other musicians, including "Four" (Miles Davis), "Early Autumn" (Stan Getz), "Four Brothers" (Woody Herman), "Sing, Sing, Sing" (Benny Goodman and Gene Krupa) and "Peanut Vendor" (Stan Kenton). Some of the material is unusual for a singer to interpret, but O'Day, one of the top jazz vocalists of the decade, improvises when the lyrics are not that strong (or barely exist). The backup by the Russ Garcia Orchestra is not all that memorable, but the focus is entirely on the vocalist, and O'Day really comes through. [An expanded reissue nearly doubled the original running time with the addition of similar material from the late '50s and early '60s.] ~ Scott Yanow

Genre

Vocal Jazz in the magazine