Albums

559 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Symphonic Music - Released November 17, 2017 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
The Munich Philharmonic and Sergiu Celibidache share an exceptional legacy. He started his work as principal conductor in 1979 and remained in this position for as long as 17 years. Sergiu Celibidache played an integral part in making the Munich Philharmonic what it is today: an orchestra of worldwide renown. Today the Munich Philharmonic is critically acclaimed internationally with hopelessly sold out concerts in Munich and the world. On their recently launched label MPHIL, the Munich Philharmonic is opening up its vast archives, giving listeners the opportunity to enjoy one of the richest collections of recordings by legendary artists. Because of the Celibidache era and its part in forming the core essence of the orchestra, this first MPHIL physical archive release consists of two recordings under the baton of Maestro Celibidache. The chosen repertoire on the album is Gustav Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder, recorded 30 June 1983 at the Herkulessaal der Residenz, Munich and Richard Strauss’ Tod und Verklärung, recorded on 17 February 1979 also at the Herkulessaal der Residenz, Munich. For a long time, Tod und Verklärung was the most popular of Richard Strauss’s early tone poems. It contains a wide range of memorable motifs subtly differentiated with the result that its music recurs whenever there is mention of death or transfiguration in Strauss’ later output. Together with the innocent tone and positively artificial naïveté of the poems that attracted Gustav Mahler as a composer and prompted him to compose the Kindertotenlieder, this thoughtfully curated pairing creates an altogether intimate character while revealing an astonishing wealth of colours. Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder feature German mezzo-soprano Brigitte Fassbaender, who holds the prestigious title “Kammersängerin” from the Bavarian State Opera and the Vienna State Opera.
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Full Operas - Released October 20, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
« This magnificent 1956 recording, conducted with genius by Karajan and with a cast such as dreams are made of, has an unparalleled status and is unlikely to be challenged for many a year. » Gramophone « This remastering comes from the original analogue tapes and has been transferred at high resolution digital quality to capture the very best sound from the tapes. In consultation with the original engineer Chris Parker, we have slightly adjusted the balance of the Trio (in Act 3) to reflect the quality of sound that was desired but not achieved at the time of recording. This recording was originally made as a mono recording by Douglas Larter, with a stereo test version engineered by Chris Parker. It is this stereo test version which has been used for this remastering. Despite the early experimental nature of this new ‘stereo’ technology, this recording is captured in astonishingly vivid sound and is a testament to the experience, understanding and skill of both the musicians and engineers of the time.» Simon Gibson, Remastering Engineer at Abbey Road Studios  
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 13, 2017 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Symphonies - Released September 29, 2017 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Gustav Mahler and the Munich Philharmonic share a very special connection. As a composer he sustainably linked the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. The world premiere of his Symphony No. 4 took place under his baton on 25 November 1901 in Munich’s Großen Kaim-Saal with the then called Kaim-Orchester, present day Munich Philharmonic. His works have been a substantial part of the Munich Philharmonic’s core repertoire ever since and the orchestra has excelled on many occasions. After the MPHIL release of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in September 2016 now follows the release of the Symphony No. 4 with which the orchestra’s history is so closely intertwined. The live concert recording released on this album took place at the Philharmonie im Gasteig in Munich, the orchestra’s home, with Salzburg soprano Genia Kuehmeier. Valery Gergiev has paid the Austro-German repertoire particular attention throughout his career, which ignited a lasting fascination for Gustav Mahler. Over recent decades he has continued to explore the Austro-German repertoire, garnering adulation, especially for his interpretations of Wagner, Strauss, Mahler and Bruckner – music that is at the very heart of the Munich Philharmonic’s repertoire. © Warner Classics
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Duets - Released September 22, 2017 | Calliope

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released September 22, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet
Poor Reger! With his pudgy figure and his pouty face, appearances have taken precedence over his music which many consider as pudgy and pouty. Which it is not. Yes, Reger was a firm supporter of absolute music, following the tradition of Beethoven and Brahms whose classical structures he combined with Wagner’s extended harmonies, adding Bach’s counterpoint; some of his works seem dense and complicated. But this is not the case with his chamber music – by the bye, chamber music makes up the biggest part of Reger’s œuvre – which reflects a condensed version of his stylistic development. And in contrast to his almost symphonic string quartets, the String Trios Opp 77b and 141b seem less symbolist-expressive than historistic-classicist. The confident, at times even cheerful (not pudgy and not pouty), character of these works convey the (superficial) impression of simplicity, despite which Reger remained true to his own style, as he explained in a letter where he described the composition as “absolutely not ‘un-Regerian’”. However, the characteristics of this “Regerian” style – dense modulations, surprising metric asymmetries and interesting part writing – are in this case subordinate to the small number of instruments and do not immediately emerge. The composer strove towards a “new simplicity”; in 1904 he wrote: “I know exactly what our music today lacks: a Mozart!” Surely it was also Mozart’s spirit which inspired Reger when he wrote his “miniature chamber music” String Trio Op. 141b in 1915. The same year, the premiere of his Piano Quartet Op. 133 was emphatically celebrated by the critics who praised its “glorious sonorities” and its “vocal, vivid and catchy” melodies. The Op. 77b, String Trio was obviously inspired by Mozart’s Divertimento K563, and the Op. 9 String Trios by Beethoven – as has often been commented upon, Reger frequently enters into an intensive dialogue with historic works of music. Star violinist Franziska Pietsch is joined, in her ensemble Trio Lirico, by a brilliant roster of colleagues, who give life to these highly deserving but neglected works.
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Symphonic Music - Released September 8, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica
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Cantatas (secular) - Released September 1, 2017 | CapriccioNR

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This is the three-part version of Mahler’s Das Klagende Lied that the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra brought us. It’s worth pointing out that the composer rearranged his piece many times. The original writing dates from 1880, when he was a proud twenty-year old; after a several refusals, he rewrote the partition in 1883 (considerably reducing the initial orchestral headcount which, admittedly, required titanic forces, and deleting the first act) then again in 1899, proof that he was holding it in some regard. It was only in 1901, when he was finally famous, that he managed to give this work in concert—but in the two-part version—, without much success, as it would seem. And yet, all of Mahler is already in this musical discourse and we shouldn’t be surprised to find many turns from this work in the symphonies and orchestral Lieder. The present recording offers a “hybrid” version, which is actually the most performed, that is to say: the first part Waldmärchen (Forest Legend) in the 1880 writing, then the two following parts Der Spielmann (The Minstrel) and Hochzeitsstück (Wedding Piece), in the 1899 rewriting. © Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 25, 2017 | La discothèque idéale de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Symphonies - Released July 7, 2017 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released May 26, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Solo Piano - Released May 12, 2017 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Symphonies - Released May 5, 2017 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
As Iván Fischer approaches the completion of his live Mahler cycle with the Budapest Festival Orchestra on Channel Classics, he unexpectedly jumps backward to one of the early symphonies, the Symphony No. 3 in D minor. Fischer is known to take his time studying scores and absorbing them thoroughly before committing to making a recording, so he appears to have waited for more than a decade for something in this work to develop and lead to a fuller understanding. The Symphony No. 3 is Mahler's longest symphony, based in part on material he had used in his song cycle Des Knaben Wunderhorn, so it is challenging in terms of balancing its unusual six-movement form and interpreting its content. That Fischer has achieved unity and clarity in his interpretation is evident in this lucid performance, which is deeply compelling for its dramatic contrasts and moving in its glorious evocation of the spiritual in nature. This 2017 audiophile release features contralto Gerhild Romberger in the somber fourth-movement setting of the "Midnight Song," taken from Friedrich Nietzche's Also sprach Zarathustra, and she is joined by the Cantemus Children's Choir and the Bavarian Radio Choir in the joyous fifth movement, which is a setting of the Wunderhorn song "Es sungen drei Engel einen süßen Gesang." Yet the purely orchestral Finale is one of Mahler's most sublime movements, and the Budapest Festival Orchestra plays with a warm radiance that brings this symphony to its inspiring conclusion.
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Solo Piano - Released April 14, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica
Disciple of Vlado Perlemuter and Jean Hubeau, Michel Dalberto has stood out as a master and ardent defender of French music in the course of a forty-year career. His signature for the Aparté label of a series of recordings devoted to Debussy, Fauré, Ravel, and Franck marks his awaited return to discs. Each episode will be recorded live and accompanied by a video. This second release, recorded on a Bechstein piano at the Conservatoire d’Art Dramatique-Paris on 7 January 2017, honours Gabriel Fauré.
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Classical - Released March 22, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason