Albums

1765 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Duets - Released November 10, 2017 | Evidence

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Chamber Music - Released November 3, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The cream of the crop of French musicians—well, okay, Swiss for the flautist Emmanuel Pahud—come together to bring us a sumptuous album devoted to Debussy’s chamber music: Edgar Moreau for the Sonata for cello and piano, Renaud Capuçon for the Sonata for violin and piano, Gérard Caussé, Marie-Pierre Anglamet and Emmanuel Pahud for the Sonata for flute, viola and harp (these three very belated sonatas are the only ones that the composer had time to finish in his planned series of “Six sonatas for various instruments by Claude Debussy, French musician”). We find the same Emmanuel Pahud performing solo for Syrinx, and the album closes with the Trio for violin, piano and cello written in a still very classic—or even conventional—style and architecture (the shadows of Franck, Massenet and Fauré undoubtedly loom) in 1880, when the composer was residing in Florence with the von Meck family. This last work was released only a hundred years later… On the piano in all the collective works, you’ll find Bertrand Chamayou. © SM
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Classical - Released October 20, 2017 | PentaTone

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released October 20, 2017 | Supraphon a.s.

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Violin Solos - Released October 20, 2017 | Solo Musica

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released October 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Solo Piano - Released October 13, 2017 | Grand Piano

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released October 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Symphonic Music - Released October 6, 2017 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
At the start of the 20th Century, "Hungarian Music" was still under the influence of the Magyaresque writing of Brahms and Liszt, which was more a mix of the sounds of the Viennese salons with Romany themes than a real reflection of popular musical traditions. It was not until the advent of the ethnomusicological research of Bartók and Kodály that the "real Hungary" made its appearance in the smart press. No-one will be surprised, then, to learn that Leo Weiner's Serenade Op. 3, written in 1906, still contains many Brahmso-Liszto-Viennese elements, whereas the further forward we move through time, the more his Hungarian language (and Romanian language, as a large eastern chunk of historic Hungary was ceded to Romania after the First World War) converges with the real folk music sound. That said, what sets Weiner apart from Bartók and Kodály is that the former suffuses his harmonisations and his transcriptions with a symphonic and post-romantic spirit (the same spirit that inspired Enescu's folk music explorations, for example), without the harmonic research of his two Hungarian colleagues, who drew upon the same trove of people's music to produce works that were ever-more-cutting edge, more avant-garde, more modern. Until the Fourth and Fifth (and last) Divertimentos of 1951, the tone remains romantic. And oh: how delicious! Neeme Järvi and the Estonian National Orchestra perform.
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | CPO

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Secular Vocal Music - Released October 6, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The Gabrieli ensemble, under the direction of their remarkable leader Paul McCreesh, explore here the immensely rich British choral repertoire which is known as partsong, a sort of choral piece made up of a profane song written or arranged for several vocal parts. The theme can originate in folk music (real or imagined), or it can be even older - the term covers a vast range of formats. This is a long way from the rather soppy variety of vaguely pastoral pieces that are widely-spread, but less rich because more constrained in rhythmic, melodic and textual terms: many of the lyrics in this record are great poetry, and represent a corpus of 20th Century madrigals every bit as rich as their glorious Renaissance ancestors. Vaughan Williams and Elgar lead the way, followed by Charles Villiers Stanford, Herbert Howell and Percy Grainger (Australian by birth, but very British at heart), Britten et Warlock (nom de plume and nom de guerre of Philip Heseltine, a flamboyant and louche figure), and finally James McMillan and Jonathan Dive bring us up to the present day. For all its modern elements, the record doesn't neglect its heritage - the iconoclastic avant-garde is dead and buried - making this a real treat for aficionados, and when this excellent music is sung by the Gabrieli ensemble, our happiness is complete. © SM/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released October 6, 2017 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Exceptional Sound Productions
Vaughan Williams’ seventh symphony (1951), Sinfonia Antartica, reuses numerous materials from the stunning piece the composer wrote in 1948 for the film Scott of the Antarctic. Therefore none will be surprised by the extraordinarily visual orchestration and theme, which any listener – even ignoring the title or cinematographic influence – will immediately associate with vast windy flatlands, scintillating icy lights, Antarctica in all its splendour – and dangers, as Scott’s expedition ended tragically, that’s the least one can say. As a complement to the programme, the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra (where they are used to the great cold!) and Andrew Davis provide us with Vaughan Williams’s Concerto For Two Pianos: initially created in 1933 for a single piano, the work was adapted to two pianos in 1946 in light of the tremendous difficult piano part, and the composer also took the opportunity to change a few sections. Here it is performed by two Canadians, Louis Lortie and Hélène Mercier. And finally you’ll discover the Four Last Songs sung by Roderick Williams, a kind of Vaughanwilliamsian equivalent to Strauss’ own Four Last Songs, even though Vaughan Williams’ four songs were first orchestrated after his death, by Anthony Payne in 2013 – scrupulously following the composer’s orchestral habits. A beautiful musical testament, created during the last few months of his life. © SM/Qobuz
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Full Operas - Released October 6, 2017 | LSO Live

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released September 15, 2017 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
“With me, musical invention is the fruit of persevering and laborious work. I find it difficult to compose, and constantly return to what I have already committed to paper. I feel drawn primarily to the organ and the orchestra. These two worlds of sound, organ and orchestra, are so inexhaustible that – in my opinion at least – they offer all kinds of possibilities for renewal.” With these words, Maurice Duruflé (1902–1986) describes his work as a composer – work that was characterized by constant doubts and scruples. His statement also makes it clear why his entire oeuvre of sacred organ and vocal music amounts to only 14 works with opus numbers, all of them strongly influenced by Gregorian chant, Late Romanticism and French Impressionism. In his Requiem, Duruflé chose to adopt the spiritual, contemplative aesthetic familiar from Gabriel Fauré’s contribution to the genre. Fauré, too, had avoided placing the drama of the Last Judgment at the heart of the work and instead chosen the spiritual confrontation with death, paired with sentiments such as gentleness and hope. Duruflé thus turned his back on the romantic Requiems by composers such as Hector Berlioz or Giuseppe Verdi who, with their penchant for the grandiose and operatic, had painted a kind of “apocalyptic fresco“. Like Fauré before him, he also dispensed with any dramatic rendition of the “Dies irae“, instead placing the idea of the resurrection at the centre of his interpretation. As with Duruflé, it is quite clear that Gregorian chant exerted a very powerful influence on the Respighi’s art; elements of it can be found in almost all the works he composed after 1920. The fact that these purist melodies, combined with the system of old church modes, fascinated him so much can to some extent be explained by the fact that they represented the greatest possible contrast to the overheated, chromatically refined harmonies of the Verists and post-Wagnerians. Escaping into atonality was never an option for Respighi; it was in the archaic, austere character of Gregorian chant that he recognized innovative potential. Respighi very happily integrated his newfound knowledge into a violin concerto, the Concerto Gregoriano, written 1921. To Respighi’s regret, the response to the world premiere was only lukewarm; indeed, he waited in vain throughout his life for a performance that would do the piece justice. Rest assured, this new interpretation by Henry Raudales is a welcome addition to the rather modest discography of the work.
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Solo Piano - Released September 8, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
This album from the pianist Luis Fernando Pérez (a student of Dimitri Bashkirov, Alicia de Larrocha and Pierre-Laurent Aimard) includes the entirety of the Cançons i Danses, or at least the ones intended for piano. Mompou composed fifteen of them, of which the thirteenth is for guitar and the fifteenth is for organ. The composition dates of these works range from 1921 to 1961 for the first twelve, while the fourteenth dates from 1978, created at the Lincoln Center in New York for the composer’s 85th birthday. Scènes d ́enfants, one of the jewels from his catalog, and one of his most renowned works, was created between 1915 and 1918, in other words at the start of his creative years. Although “Iberianising”, if you forgive our use of this term, Mompou didn’t like to be referred to as a nationalist composer, preferring the term regionalist. “Not really knowing the true style of my music,” he said, “I’ve been classified as an exclusively folkloric composer, against which I had to express my disapprobation many times. My only arrogance is to believe that I managed to create an ethnic sounding music, without falling into the trap and excess of popular themes.” Luis Fernando Pérez is a regular of prestigious festivals such as Schleswig-Holstein, La Roque d'Anthéron, Richter in La Grange de Meslay, Jacobins in Toulouse, Santander and Granada, the Musical Fortnight in Donosti and Musika-Musica of Bilbao. He has been a soloist for the Symphony Orchestra of Barcelona and National of Catalonia, Real Filharmonía of Galicia, Symphony of Bilbao, Symphony of the Principality of Asturias, Orchestral Ensemble of Paris and Kanazawa, Symphony Warsaw, Symphony of Euskadi, the RTVE Symphony, the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra of Budapest and the Mannheim Chamber Orchestra, and also the National Orchestra of Spain.