Albums

786 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
£7.19

Chamber Music - Released April 15, 2018 | Arion

£13.49

Classical - Released March 2, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

£10.79
£7.19

Duets - Released February 23, 2018 | Indésens

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
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Full Operas - Released January 5, 2018 | Oehms Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£9.59
£6.39

Symphonic Music - Released December 8, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Secular Vocal Music - Released November 10, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Quartets - Released November 3, 2017 | Stradivarius

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£11.99
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Classical - Released October 27, 2017 | HORTUS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£9.59
£6.39

Chamber Music - Released October 27, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£18.99
£13.49

Symphonic Music - Released October 27, 2017 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Don't be fooled by the album cover: the music recorded here is NOT Maderna, but Frescobaldi, Gabrieli and a few other composers from the same era, only orchestrated by Maderna. Among these late Renaissance and baroque works, as re-written, can be found, as a kind of pillar whose meaning in the album rather defies comprehension, the Sequenza XII by Berio which was initially conceived for a guitar solo and transcribed by the composer for guitar and chamber orchestra under the name of Chemins V. The whole work is about orchestrations, re-editions, translations from other eras. When it comes to Maderna and other old composers, the interest is neither musicological nor historical, as the orchestrations were done in the 20th Century, with 20th-Century orchestral techniques. Maderna's work, dating from the 1950s to the 1970s, bears witness to the widespread interest in masters from the past, with new editions, exhumations, rediscoveries; and Monteverdi was played without overmuch concern for period instruments - even if Hindemith, for example, tried to perform L’Orfeo with what old instruments he was able to gather... Seen from this point of view, the Maderna orchestrations are almost recompositions, although without ever betraying or travestying the manuscript, as Stravinsky did with Pergolese: it sticks, for example, to a "baroque" orchestra from our times, without instruments which did not exist at the time. A truly interesting recording. © SM/Qobuz
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Concertos for wind instruments - Released October 24, 2017 | Indésens

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released October 6, 2017 | Kairos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£9.59

Symphonic Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Wergo

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Dialogue with Haydn is a characteristic stage along the way to the “composed interpretation” (Hans Zender’s most famous such work being Schuberts Winterreise) created in 1982 on Haydn’s 250th birthday, and was first performed at the Donaueschinger Music Days that same year. The object of musical changes taken from the G-major Symphony No. 94 “Surprise”. This theme, as simple as a nursery rhyme, is handled much more subtly than the usual variation style, by putting it into play for three differently tuned orchestra groups, each differing from the other by 11 cent (about one-tenth of the half-tone, or half a “comma”), a fundamental value in the complicated theme of the “tempered tuning”. The Haydn theme whose “fundamental elements appear interchanged, distorted, mixed up, superimposed, partly destroyed or beyond recognition” (Zender) enters this complex and fragile sound space. Tonalities, styles, epochs and emotions are layered, cross-faded and sent into surreal developments. As for Zender’s “Japanese” pieces, there are four compositions with “kyō” (singing, song) in their title, two of which are recorded here, Issei no kyō (2009) and Nanzen no kyō (1992). The listener should in no way expect any postcard-like mock-Japanese musical content, as Zender merely takes the original Zen Japanese poetry – in Issei, they are sung in German, then Japanese, then French, then English – to weave his very own style of music. Highly original contemporary music it is, and should be revered as such. © SM/Qobuz
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Trios - Released September 1, 2017 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
There is a world of difference between Hindemith’s First Trio, composed in 1924 “on a train” as the composer stated in his own catalogue, and his 1933 Second Trio. While the first features some of these relentless, almost Prokofievian, rhythmic and thematic elements, the second rolls out its extremely sophisticated contrapuntal language along a soft lyrical canvas (with a touch of humour here and there) specific to later Hindemith. There is also a world of difference between Hindemith’s Trios and Schoenberg’s, written in 1946, soon after the composer almost died from a heart attack. Granted, the thematic structure is based on a dodecaphonic series, but after a brief adjustment period, it becomes impossible not to notice countless tiny tonal, harmonic waves skilfully hidden below the overall texture. The composer was quoted saying this particular work was “a description of his illness”, most probably with a fair share of dark humour. Thomas Mann claimed that Schoenberg told him he had secretly represented his medical treatment, the nurse and everything else in his music. Hanns Eisler, for his part, thought he had discovered which chords represented the injections… Ouch! Typically Schoenberg. Trio Zimmermann is made up of three great international soloists: violinist Frank Peter Zimmermann, violist Antoine Tamestit and cellist Christian Poltéra. And all three play on Stradivariuses, no less! © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Winter & Winter

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Exceptional Sound Productions
Danish composer Hans Abrahamsen's four quartets are presented here by the famous Arditti String Quartet, in reverse order of composition: the  Fourth (2012), the Third, (2008), the Second (1981) - you may have noticed the huge gap, which will make more sense once you know that between 1990 and 2000 he put down his pen and stopped composing altogether - and then the First (1973), which was written as "Ten Preludes". From his earliest days as a composer, Abrahamsen has shunned the avant-garde doctrines of the "Darmstadt School", preferring to learn from his teacher Ligeti, in a language he took to calling the "New Simplicity". When listening to these four works, one is indeed struck by Abrahamsen's ability to create recognisable lines, at once modern and very old, sometimes bearing the traces (real or imagined) of folk airs, with a clear love for the most keening moments; and putting harmonics to mind-blowing use. The listener will realised that they are in the presence of a highly original piece of music, modern for sure: but it doesn't require a forced intellectual effort – rather, it demands that the listener abandon themselves to the rich and captivating discourse of the four musicians of the Arditti Quartet. © SM/Qobuz