Albums

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Solo Piano - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Keyboard Concertos - Released September 2, 2014 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released April 2, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pianiste Maestro - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 4, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Solo Piano - Released May 1, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 6, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released October 26, 2010 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released August 24, 2010 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released July 27, 2010 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Symphonies - Released June 29, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Exceptional sound - Hi-Res Audio
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Solo Piano - Released March 30, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
Perhaps one of classical music's least noted but most important stories of the new millennium has been the profusion of recordings of Haydn's keyboard sonatas, each as different from the others as are the major schools of playing Beethoven, if not more so. Part of the reason for the variety is that, as French pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet points out here, Haydn's manuscripts contained very little in the way of interpretive markings, leaving the field open for future performers and editors. Bavouzet, operating in the sonically superb environment of Suffolk, England's Potton Hall and playing a modern Yamaha, nevertheless adopts the fruits of historical research in his approach. He takes the repeats and heavily ornaments them, without, however, drawing attention to himself in the process. More generally, his tone is clean, very quiet, and rather harpsichord-like. In the slow movements of these four middle-period sonatas he's low-key indeed, but his playing holds up under attentive listening; his playing successfully draws the listener into an intimate space. Bavouzet's readings generally have the sort of Haydn X factor that leaves the listener completely unsure of what's coming next. Strongly recommended and whets the appetite for other albums in the occasional series that Bavouzet promises is coming.
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Classical - Released November 17, 2009 | Chandos

Booklet
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Quartets - Released October 27, 2009 | Chandos

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released October 27, 2009 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 29, 2009 | Chandos

Booklet
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Symphonic Music - Released April 28, 2009 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released November 18, 2008 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - Hi-Res Audio
The revival in performances of the early Italian-Austrian symphony at first bypassed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's father Leopold, and all the pieces on this disc are receiving their first recordings. Leopold was well known as a symphonist on his own before his son came on the scene. Chronological control over his output has not yet been fully achieved, but the music heard here was likely composed in the 1750s and 1760s. As such, it arose during a time when the symphony coexisted with a host of other multi-movement instrumental genres, which could vary in terms of both forces and function. One of these "symphonies" was labeled as a "parthia," a serenade-like form possibly related to the Feldparthie and intended to evoke a military or hunting atmosphere. That work, here labeled the Symphony (Partia) in C major, C 4, has a lazy noctural atmosphere and actually seems less characteristic of outdoor music than several of the other symphonies, which have active horn parts. This probably shows only that publishers of the day slapped onto pieces whatever title suited them. The key point is that Leopold Mozart composed fluently in a variety of early symphony types and seems to have used their basic ideas (opening fanfares, solo violin parts in minuets, and a fugal finale all occur along the way here) in something other than purely functional ways. There is no way to be sure about this, inasmuch as little is known of Leopold's career, but the implications of this variety for an understanding of Wolfgang's training are rich: part of the greatness of Wolfgang's music lies in his ability to expand a seemingly generic core into something really unusual. This CD gives listeners an excellent taste of the issues. The music is all sunny and pleasant in the way characteristic of the age, and even listeners completely unacquainted with the early Classical-period symphony will enjoy it. The modern-instrument London Mozart players under Matthias Bamert deal well with the varied textures of the music, executing details like horn trills without flinching, but the combination of a fairly large chamber orchestra and harsh church sound results in string passages that are not quite as silky as one would wish. This is nevertheless recommended as a good place to begin for those who want to grapple with just what it was that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart heard when he was little, and how it shaped him.