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Classical - Released January 25, 2019 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 11, 2012 | MAFY, Inc

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« Blade Runner : Music from the motion Picture — A 30th Anniversary Celebration » is a new recording of the classic score composed by Vangelis, produced and performed by composer Edgar Rothermich. Released in 1982, Blade Runner was directed by Ridley Scott and featured Harrison Ford in his second starring role after Raiders Of The Lost Ark. Celebrating its 30th Anniversary in 2012, Blade Runner has become a cult film favorite the world over. Loosely based on a 1968 Philip K. Dick novel, Ford starred as Rick Deckard, a former police officer reluctantly assigned to terminate four replicants who have come to Earth to find their maker. Over the years, multiple edits of the film have been created for the home video, DVD and Blu-Ray markets. Similarly Vangelis' score has been released in several different incarnations, but none of them are accurate representations of what was heard in the original 1982 film. "Largely because of a dispute between Vangelis and Scott over the director's use of his music in the film, a proper soundtrack of the music as it is heard in the film has never been commercially issued (despite the promise of a soundtrack album from Polydor Records given in the film's end titles)," described Randall D. Larson in the liner notes of the new recording from BSX (Buysoundtrax) record label. Buysoundtrax Records seeks to correct this oversight, with a new recording faithfully recreating the original music from the film, which proved to be a difficult task. Vangelis' score was composed entirely by performing on keyboards and recording it directly, so no written transcriptions exist. Composer Edgar Rothermich was charged with reverse engineering the score — listening to the original music and a 1982 album mock-up and transcribing it by ear. He also had to recreate the sound of 1982 synthesizers and decipher if noise heard was due to recording on tape or stylistic choices by the composer. "The objective from the very beginning was to be as close as possible to the original score as heard in the film," Rothermich said. "It was never a case of my interpreting the soundtrack. It was essentially a re-recording of the soundtrack music."" Blade Runner is the most difficult kind of score to deconstruct," said BSX producer Ford A. Thaxton. "Symphonic music can usually be determined because the instrumental palette is known. But the 1970s-era electronic technology and the improvisational style in which Vangelis created the score made it especially difficult. But we feel Edgar's made a very close replication of what the score sounded like in the film. He's true to the sound the original but he's brought it into today's world." "The objective from the very beginning was to be as close as possible to the original score as heard in the film," Rothermich said. "It was never a case of my interpreting the soundtrack. It was essentially a re-recording of the soundtrack music."
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Pop - Released September 22, 1992 | Rhino

Suitably grand in scale and far-reaching in its scope, this soundtrack is the first new music from Vangelis since 1990's The City. 1492 stands up well next to Vangelis's classic Chariots of Fire, due to his innate ability to get right inside the material and provide an integral part of the film itself. Vangelis succeeds in capturing the 15th-century mood, mixing rich choral portions with modern elements, and portraying the larger than life character of Columbus, complete with full-range, dynamic sound. © Backroads Music/Heartbeats /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Windham Hill Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Those used to Vangelis' later and lighter synthesized outings may not be quite ready for this dark, thundering album. While it did provide us with the theme music for the TV series Cosmos and bring Jon Anderson into partnership with Vangelis (following an abortive approach to Vangelis joining Yes) on "So Long Ago, So Clear," it also served up massed Gothic choirs and a musical depiction of all the tortures of the damned, with an impressive amount of string-driven shrieking. Even so, it's a brilliant piece of work that should not be absent from any Vangelis collection. © Steven McDonald /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1973 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Vangelis is one of the most celebrated electronic musicians ever. He is certainly the most popular and most widely heard. His albums feature symphony orchestras to augment his electronics. His older discs are classics in the symphonic synthesizer style. L'Apocalypse Des Animaux is one of his earliest albums. It is the soundtrack to the Frederic Rossi film of the same name. The LP is short (35 minutes), as it was originally recorded in the analog domain. Vangelis has always had the innate ability to paint pictures with his music. The atmospheres are lush and full, and deep listeners will see the music. This will appeal to fans of Constance Demby, Yanni, Suzanne Ciani, and Jon Jenkins. © Jim Brenholts /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 28, 1996 | Rhino

In the tradition of John Tesh, Kitaro, Yanni, and others in the field of lush, synthesizer-driven mood music, Vangelis cranks out another collection of tunes heavy on hooks and light on substance. A few too many sweeps up and down the harp litter this recording with continual fading into environmental ocean sounds. Chords are simple, progressions are simple, melodies are simple (if they exist). Things get more upbeat toward the last half of the disc, which features a fat bass sound and a classic 4/4 rock backbeat. There is little to sustain the music here beyond your basic background music. The cover featuring out-of-focus smiling synchronized swimmers does not help. © Mark W.B. Allender /TiVo
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Classical - Released September 23, 2016 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

Rosetta is the first non-soundtrack effort since 2001’s Mythodea: Music for the NASA Mission 2001 Mars Odyssey, from esteemed Greek composer Vangelis. Combining lush electronics with resonant and ethereal string work, the record was inspired by the European Space Agency probe mission of the same name that reached its landing target in 2014. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Classical - Released February 12, 1991 | Windham Hill Records

As far as Vangelis' early work is concerned (pertaining to the five years of his solo career), Spiral stands up quite well, although it's almost always regarded as an inessential effort. Although the structures and the overall dynamics of the pieces are less complicated and less sophisticated, Spiral's keyboard utilization is still extremely effectual, even if it does take awhile to get off the ground. The five tracks that make up the album aren't as atmospheric or as elaborately shifting as 1975's Heaven and Hell or 1976's Albedo 0.39, but his musical movement does seem to transgress toward full, complete soundscapes, especially in "To the Unknown Man," the album's best example of Vangelis' artistry. The album is based on a dancer's appreciation of the universe and how it spirals into infinity, a concept which came to him through his own pirouettes. Both "Spiral" and "Ballad" touch ever so lightly on melody, appropriately relating to the album's theme, while the lengthy "3+3" begins to unveil Vangelis' creativity and sense of electronic exploration. After Spiral, Vangelis' style changed somewhat, with more of a smoother, more melodic approach to the synthesizer, implemented to create a closer relationship between classical and electronic music. Albums such as Beauborg and China lay claim to this, also employing stronger ties between the theme and the music, while 1981's Chariots of Fire has him merging the two styles completely. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 26, 1998 | Rhino

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Pop/Rock - Released April 29, 1997 | Windham Hill Records

Albedo 0.39 represents some of Vangelis' most fascinating material from the early portion of his career. Using transforming tonal washes and lengthy runs of calm but effective synthesizer passages, Vangelis tackles the wonder and allure of the galaxy and its planetary bodies, making for an entertaining display of his keyboard expertise. Likened to Heaven and Hell (but with shorter passages) and to Spiral, the album that followed Albedo 0.39, the tracks are mesmerizing trips of assorted rhythms that include elements of jazz and mild rock, adding some welcomed differentiation to the nine pieces. The title track includes narrated statistics about planetary distances and such behind a forwarding voyage of tempered notes, making for one of Vangelis' most novel compositions. Along with "Albedo 0.39," the two parts of "Nucleogenesis" are among the strongest cuts that keep his cosmic theme from deviating, while the livelier "Pulstar" involves some impressive instrumental range and electronic buoyancy. Even in shortened form, his distinct pastiches are quite compelling, and the stretches of notes and rhythms don't become weary or monotonous at any point of the album. Vangelis' intention of conjuring up the vastness and immensity of space is soundly accomplished, and for the remainder of his career he employed the same type of atmospheric sketching (taking advantage of technological advancements in the area of synthesized music, of course) for numerous soundtracks and other conceptual works. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 1984 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Soil Festivities dates from 1984, before Vangelis was working with orchestras. Some would say that it was before he "sold out" or when he was a "real musician," but those opinions are totally subjective. It is certain that this is a different kind of work. The album features five movements, each a self-contained soundscape. Vangelis surrounds a subtle drone with heavy sequences and dense atmospheres. He uses a symphonic synth to create pastoral textures. This is a very accessible album. It will appeal to fans of Constance Demby, Wendy Carlos, Victor Cerullo, and Yanni. © Jim Brenholts /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1985 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Mask is an e-music symphony in six movements. Vangelis is near his best on this album. He takes the best from his many different e-music personas and creates huge walls of dramatic and hypnotic sound. Vangelis combines symphonic synths, atmospheres, Berlin school sequences, choral chants, and sweet melodies in this soundscape. The mood shifts from bombastic to triumphant to mysterious to challenging and back and forth and in and out. The atmospheres weave through and around the soundscape, never losing the drama. Deep listeners will be on the edges of their seats. This great CD is like a soundtrack with no film. © Jim Brenholts /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 4, 1989 | Universal Music Division Barclay

Yeah, it just wouldn't be a "wild party" without the music of Vangelis. Actually, Frederic Rossif's film, La Fete Sauvage, is translated into English as "The Wilderness Party," but it still doesn't scream out electronic space music. To accommodate the new environment, the first part of Vangelis' score incorporates some animal screams of its own, along with African drums and chanting to create a semi-electronic melange. While there are moments that are pure Vangelis (the opening theme, some spooky synthesizers, and disembodied percussion at the end), the first half of La Fete Sauvage is generally an uneasy tug of war between electronics and percussion. (Of course, even Patrick Moraz had trouble juggling the two.) The second part of La Fete Sauvage is a much different story; beginning with a lullaby introduced earlier (albeit briefly), this is the surfeit of flush emotion and elegant melody that shows the composer in full, confident stride. Although it's lovely, it does sound suspiciously like "To Dream the Impossible Dream" (from Man of la Mancha) after a while. Thankfully, Vangelis leaves the original theme to explore other, occasionally darker, avenues. While the second part of La Fete Sauvage seems to exist independent of the film, it is the more satisfying of the musical halves and would have felt at home on any number of Vangelis albums from the '70s. The director Rossif, who had enlisted Vangelis' services earlier for L'Apocalypse des Animaux, likely knew what he was getting from the electronic composer, and thus got what he wanted. No doubt Vangelis' score added intensity to the film by underscoring the savagery of nature. While the second half works well as stand-alone music and the first half provides an unusual (and thus interesting) setting for Vangelis, La Fete Sauvage isn't worth hunting down unless you're a Vangelis collector (and even then you may not be wild about the price, since this is available only as an import). © Dave Connolly /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 21, 2012 | Creazioni Artistiche Musicali C.A.M. S.r.l.

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Progressive Rock - Released May 3, 1993 | RCA Camden

Perhaps this Camden collection of Vangelis tracks should have been retitled The Best of Vangelis 1972-1985. It might have made more sense, but that's a small complaint because what is here is terrific. There are cuts from Spiral and Beauborg, from the Jon & Vangelis recordings, and even from the Cosmos TV series narrated by Carl Sagan. The sound is good, as is the presentation, and it's a nice little introduction -- with the word "little" being the main word in the sentence. Vangelis so often works conceptually -- and has from the very beginning -- that it's tough to size him up in a single-disc retrospective or even really introduce him. But this set tries and, for what it is, does a decent job. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Electronic - Released August 17, 2004 | FM Records (Greece)

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 2, 2012 | Creazioni Artistiche Musicali C.A.M. S.r.l.

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Classical - Released January 25, 2019 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released October 31, 1988 | Arista

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Soundtracks - Released June 5, 2012 | BSX Records