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Classical - To be released March 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Classical - To be released March 2, 2018 | Universal Music

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Classical - To be released March 2, 2018 | Genuin

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Classical - To be released March 2, 2018 | APR

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Classical - Released February 19, 2018 | Boston Place Music

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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Priory Records

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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
Unfortunately no, dear reader, there is no such thing as a cycle of “24 Preludes” by Rachmaninoff; however there are indeed 24 Preludes: a collection of ten Op. 23 from 1903, 13 other Op. 32 from 1910 and one isolated Prelude from the Morceaux de fantaisie Op. 3 (Fantasy Pieces) from 1893. In total: 24 Preludes, in which as a simple count shows Rachmaninoff − much like Chopin and of course Bach − illustrated all major and minor tones. Deliberately random, or the involuntary drive to create a reasonably coherent cycle? Contrary to his two illustrious predecessors, Rachmaninoff didn’t order his Preludes according to a specific tonal plan: the musician’s fantasy develops bit by bit. Nikolai Lugansky – described by the famous magazine Gramophone as “the most innovative and transcendent interpreter of all” (so much for the others…), truly an extraordinarily deep and polyvalent pianist – decided to present the Preludes in the order prescribed by partitions, rather than reorganising them according to some hypothetical tonal logic, without knowing if Rachmaninoff would even have recommended or even considered it, particularly as the constant alternation of moods, independently of any tonal consideration, gives the piece a sense of perfect coherence. Finally it’s worth mentioning that Lugansky offers a very “original” interpretation of this divine music, which may feel like a re-discovery to some listeners. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | Halidon

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Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | Evidence

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2018 | Propeller Recordings

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Pop - Released February 7, 2018 | Propeller Recordings

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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | BIS

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Oh no, it’s not the program of this album that’s any kind of news – after all, Rachmaninov’s Second and Third piano concertos have been recorded over and over again by dozen pianists since their very composition – but the interpretation of Russian pianist Yevgeny Sudbin, born in 1980 in Saint-Petersburg. Hailed by “The Daily Telegraph” as ‘potentially one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century’, Yevgeny Sudbin released his first album on BIS in 2005. Since then his recordings have met with critical acclaim and have been regularly featured as “CD of the Month” by the highly choosy BBC Music Magazine or “Editor’s Choice” by the none less choosy Gramophone. Sudbin performs regularly in prestigious venues such as London’s Royal Festival Hall and Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Tonhalle Zurich, the Avery Fisher Hall in New York. Recent engagements have included performances with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra, the Gewandhaus Leipzig, and Philharmonia Orchestra. His love of chamber music has resulted in partnerships with musicians including Hilary Hahn, Julia Fischer and the Chilingirian Quartet among others. Appearances at festivals include Aspen, La Roque d’Anthéron, Mostly Mozart and Verbier. In 2016 he was nominated Artist of the Year at the prestigious Gramophone Classical Music Awards. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
For this album, which is made up entirely of "treats" from all manner of genres, the cellist Gautier Capuçon seems to have wanted to "illustrate" his life by retracing different emotional stages, from his childhood in Savoy to his Vienna years, by way of his studies in Paris and his discovery of more recent repertoires. This is a sort of invitation on a voyage, in the company of the Paris Chamber Orchestra, or by pianist Jérôme Ducros, for a few unmissable pieces by Saint-Saëns, Massenet, Popper, Joplin, Tchaikovsky, Popper, Piazzola, Casals or Paganini: this way, we are able to hear works which are often performed as transcriptions, as in the golden age of salon virtuosos. These hyper-virtuoso, hyper-romantic pieces allow us to enjoy our cellist's art to its full. © SM/Qobuz