Similar artists

Albums

£19.79
£13.79

Solo Piano - Released February 16, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Unfortunately no, dear reader, there is no such thing as a cycle of “24 Preludes” by Rachmaninoff; however there are indeed 24 Preludes: a collection of ten Op. 23 from 1903, 13 other Op. 32 from 1910 and one isolated Prelude from the Morceaux de fantaisie Op. 3 (Fantasy Pieces) from 1893. In total: 24 Preludes, in which as a simple count shows Rachmaninoff − much like Chopin and of course Bach − illustrated all major and minor tones. Deliberately random, or the involuntary drive to create a reasonably coherent cycle? Contrary to his two illustrious predecessors, Rachmaninoff didn’t order his Preludes according to a specific tonal plan: the musician’s fantasy develops bit by bit. Nikolai Lugansky – described by the famous magazine Gramophone as “the most innovative and transcendent interpreter of all” (so much for the others…), truly an extraordinarily deep and polyvalent pianist – decided to present the Preludes in the order prescribed by partitions, rather than reorganising them according to some hypothetical tonal logic, without knowing if Rachmaninoff would even have recommended or even considered it, particularly as the constant alternation of moods, independently of any tonal consideration, gives the piece a sense of perfect coherence. Finally it’s worth mentioning that Lugansky offers a very “original” interpretation of this divine music, which may feel like a re-discovery to some listeners. © SM/Qobuz
£14.49
£12.49

Classical - Released October 21, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
There is no shortage of recordings of Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, one of the most popular pieces in the classical repertory ever since its slow-movement clarinet solo underlaid the quintessence of cinematic romance, Brief Encounter. But this one, by pianist Alexandre Tharaud (he may not be as well known as the decision to omit his first name in the graphics would presume, but he's getting there), is worth strong consideration. It's not blood-and-thunder Rachmaninov, so those seeking that in the C minor concerto might look elsewhere. But there's absolute clarity throughout, and with that an attractively variable dialogue with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra under Alexander Vedernikov, one of the unsung Russian conductors who are having the times of their lives in Britain these days. Perhaps the highlight of the album is the early set of Cinq Morceaux de fantaisie, Op. 3, in which Tharaud's way with a restrained but involving narrative thread comes to the fore. Sample the character piece "Polichinelle" in F sharp minor. The version of the Vocalise, Op. 34, here is unremarkable, and the two Pieces for six hands at the end are not the virtuoso showpieces that might be imagined, but rather salon novelties. So the program peters out somewhat. But those in search of an elegant C minor concerto or near-definitive Cinq Morceaux de fantaisie should hear this release.
£7.99

Sacred Vocal Music - Released May 18, 2018 | DUX

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
One might well say: this is just yet another recording of Rachmaninov's Vespers. And while, objectively, that's what this is, it’s also a reading which differs markedly from the norm – the norm in question being to drown the discourse in an intense reverberation, natural or artificial, and to record it at a distance, to create a "churchy" feel. None of that here: the choir – exemplary, superb – of the Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic in Poland, an institution based in Białystok, is recorded here quite close up, almost intimately, with no added reverb and in a comfortable acoustic location: the European Art Centre in Białystok. The result is that the listener hears every word and almost every counter-punctual line – and Rachmaninov had a field day with this, adding up to eleven real voices into the most harmonically intense passages. We bet that for many, this will be a real discovery, of an immense masterpiece of Slavic religious music. We also note that the soloists are of great quality and that the basso profundos demanded of the choir at points are real basso profundos, not unfortunate bass baritones in danger of asphyxiation. Hats off. © SM/Qobuz
£16.99
£14.49

Classical - Released March 10, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Sacred Vocal Music - Released July 21, 2017 | Genuin

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
£20.99
£14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 2, 2018 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
£11.99
£7.99

Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Oh no, it’s not the program of this album that’s any kind of news – after all, Rachmaninov’s Second and Third piano concertos have been recorded over and over again by dozen pianists since their very composition – but the interpretation of Russian pianist Yevgeny Sudbin, born in 1980 in Saint-Petersburg. Hailed by “The Daily Telegraph” as ‘potentially one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century’, Yevgeny Sudbin released his first album on BIS in 2005. Since then his recordings have met with critical acclaim and have been regularly featured as “CD of the Month” by the highly choosy BBC Music Magazine or “Editor’s Choice” by the none less choosy Gramophone. Sudbin performs regularly in prestigious venues such as London’s Royal Festival Hall and Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Tonhalle Zurich, the Avery Fisher Hall in New York. Recent engagements have included performances with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra, the Gewandhaus Leipzig, and Philharmonia Orchestra. His love of chamber music has resulted in partnerships with musicians including Hilary Hahn, Julia Fischer and the Chilingirian Quartet among others. Appearances at festivals include Aspen, La Roque d’Anthéron, Mostly Mozart and Verbier. In 2016 he was nominated Artist of the Year at the prestigious Gramophone Classical Music Awards. © SM/Qobuz
£17.49
£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
£14.99
£9.99

Solo Piano - Released February 9, 2018 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Twenty years of Russian piano: that's what we're being offered by the young pianist Jean-Paul Gasparian in his first - much-remarked-upon and very remarkable - discographic work. Gasparian starts in 1897 with Scriabin's Second Sonata (also known as the Sonata Fantasy), still strongly redolent of Chopin, but already showing a few of those harmonic equivocations which were so dear to the mystical composer). And then another Second Sonata, this one by Prokofiev in 1912 - with the "motoric", wild aspect very much to the fore. The pianist has made the very wise decision not to overdo the score's brutality, and carefully avoids drowning the work in noisome pedal effects. In the same year, 1912, Scriabin wrote his Three Études Op. 65 in the style of his late maturity, which shines through on Poem of Ecstasy: here again, the soloist opts for transparency, allowing the listener to really follow the harmonic and thematic content - if we can really give the name "themes" to these snatched vignettes, these stitched-together scraps, these ferocious sallies which sound like calls to musical revolt. The album opens with nine Études-tableaux Op. 39 by Rachmaninov, written in 1917, which mix the technical side of the étude with evocative art; deliberately imprecise, the composer never prescribes a programme, providing every listener and pianist with a blank canvas to fill as they see fit. To be sure, the "Isle of the Dead" element breaks out most fully in the second étude, in particular with the deathlessly evocative scraps of the Dies irae... In any case, let us welcome Jean-Paul Gasparian to the great European stage, after his short-notice stint as a stand-in for Zacharias in Germany, and whose career is unfolding with speed and confidence. © SM/Qobuz
£13.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Special Soundchecks
£16.49
£11.99

Classical - Released February 24, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
£16.99

Concertos - Released November 10, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica
£7.19
£4.79

Classical - Released May 11, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
While Israeli-Russian pianist Boris Giltburg’s career is taking off all over the world, he has felt very close to Belgium ever since he won first prize in the 2013 Queen Elisabeth Competition. After several recordings for EMI (Warner), here he gives a studio rendition of the Third Concerto, and the Variations on a Theme of Corelli by Sergei Rachmaninov, on his tenth album for Naxos, which completes his often-unique approach to the Russian pianist-composer. The Études-tableaux and the Second Concerto divided opinion, with some seeing him as a "new Glenn Gould" (sic) who would do away with routines, while others drew attention to the total indifference of his style. Boris Giltburg's technique is such that he can give free rein to his imagination while taking care of the minute details of one of the most difficult concertos in the repertoire. Fascinated by the manufacture of instruments, in 2016 he took up the new 102-key piano from French manufacturer Stephen Paulello, a thrilling instrument which the musical world has been eagerly anticipating for a long time, and which proves that, just like in the 19th century, the piano can still evolve towards other sounds. For this Concerto n° 3, recorded at Glasgow's Royal Concert Hall, Boris Giltburg returns to his dear Fazioli piano and is joined by Mexican conductor Carlo Miguel Prieto at the head of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. © François Hudry/Qobuz
£17.49
£12.49

Classical - Released March 14, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
How bad is it? Right from the colossal chords that open Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2, it's bad. Lang Lang starts slow and gets slower until he nearly stops the music, destroying the rhythmic intensity and the harmonic tension. When Valery Gergiev brings in the Orchestra of the Marinsky Theatre, the tempo snaps into place for the first theme and Gergiev holds the music at tempo until the second theme. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the lyrical line and the momentum. When Gergiev brings the Orchestra back in, the tempo snaps back into place for the development and Gergiev keeps the music at tempo until the cadenza. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the formal drama and the structural integrity. And so it goes for the rest of the Concerto, with Gergiev holding to the tempo and Lang slowing to a stop until the music is ultimately tattered and torn between them. It's not that Lang lacks the technique. The billions of notes of Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody are in place. It's not that Lang lacks the tone. The depth of sound of the Andante Cantabile Variation is enormous. It's that Lang lacks the taste and temperament. His playing is self-amused and self-indulgent. He's so enraptured by his own playing that he starts slow to show off and he gets slower to admire his own performance. It's narcissism as an interpretive strategy. Deutsche Grammophon is dark and hooded.
£11.99
£8.49

Classical - Released December 4, 2005 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
£14.99
£9.99

Concertos - Released August 25, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet
Serge Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto might never have seen the light of day had it not been for hypnosis: before the twenty-seven-year-old composer began work on it, he was on his last legs – financially, artistically and psychologically. Dr Nikolay Dahl hypnotised his patient every day, whispering to him: ‘You will write your concerto. You will work with great fluency. The concerto will be of excellent quality.’ The creative block disappeared, and the concerto’s premiere in Moscow in 1901 was a triumph for Rachmaninov, who played the solo part himself. Anna Vinnitskaya says she feels ‘a spring-like atmosphere’ in this work: throughout there is a sense of movement, of awakening. The music passes through the most contrasting psychological landscapes, but moves towards clarity and light. Rachmaninov composed the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini in 1934, ten years before his death. Brahms, Liszt, Lutosławski and Andrew Lloyd Webber are among the remarkable roll call of composers inspired by Paganini’s theme. The Russian pianist and the Polish conductor Krzysztof Urbański have often played Rachmaninoff together, on every continent. The two artists, both of whom present here their third disc for Alpha, were reunited in the NDR studios in Hamburg to record this repertory that fits them like a glove. © Alpha
£8.49

Classical - Released December 8, 2004 | Mirare

Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique
This is about as appealing a disc of Rachmaninov's complete preludes for piano as one is likely to hear, but its impact may not be immediately evident. That caveat might at first seem a bit odd considering the first piece here is the famous Prélude in C sharp minor, one of the best known, as well as one of the loudest works the Russian composer ever penned, and one might reasonably expect that it would start the disc off with a bang. But Russian pianist Boris Berezovsky takes another approach to the work; rather than starting with the climax and trying vainly to get bigger and louder from there, he builds slowly and purposefully to a shattering climax that not only makes the performance, but redeems the piece from a century of brutal mistreatment. Berezovsky continues that approach throughout his performances, carefully and scrupulously sculpting each prelude, yet never skimping on passion, power, and energy, and ultimately delivering an effective and exciting set of performances. Though the digital sound of this 2004 recording is not quite as clear as it could be, it does have tremendous impact.
£17.49
£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
£7.19
£4.79

Solo Piano - Released May 6, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month