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Classical - Released October 28, 2008 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award
If after hearing this superb 2008 Naxos disc some obstinate listeners insist on maintaining that the Manfred Symphony and the symphonic ballad The Voyevoda are lesser Tchaikovsky, it's not the fault of the performers. Vasily Petrenko is a talented conductor who knows how to get the best out of a score and an orchestra and his honest fondness for the repertoire cannot be doubted. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic is likewise a skillful orchestra with a polished sound, a tight ensemble, and excellent soloists. But though Petrenko keeps things moving and the Liverpool musicians keep things taut, Manfred and Voyevoda refuse to become more than what they are: evocative but episodic scores filled with banal themes, garish orchestrations, and turgid rhythms. So while those stubborn listeners might concede few earlier recordings of Manfred and the Voyevoda have surpassed this one, they might also acknowledge Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool cannot redeem these two lugubrious works from their less than exalted status in Tchaikovsky's oeuvre. Naxos' digital sound is clear and colorful, if a bit distant. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 9, 2016 | Naxos

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Chamber Music - Released November 8, 2019 | Naxos

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Brass instruments are a vital part of the festive fabric of Christmas, and Tchaikovsky’s iconic ballet The Nutcracker is made even more joyful with the brassy brilliance of Septura. Narrated by pre-eminent actor Derek Jacobi, The Nutcracker is set on Christmas Eve, with music both rapturous and fantastical. It tells the story of how young Clara’s favourite present, a nutcracker shaped like a little man, turns into a handsome prince at midnight. Septura has been acclaimed by Brass Band World for its ‘stylistic perfection’ and ‘beautifully portrayed artistry’. © Naxos
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Classical - Released March 10, 2017 | Naxos

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Violin Concertos - Released November 12, 2003 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released March 27, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Largely overshadowed by the immense popularity of the First Piano Concerto, Tchaikovsky's Second Piano Concerto is no less deserving of attention and enjoyment. Although a completely different beast than the First Concerto, Op. 44 is still filled with the trademark compositional characteristics of most of Tchaikovsky's works, including long, beautiful melodies, and thunderous bravura opportunities for pianist and orchestra alike. The very long first movement is, as it was criticized for at its inception, highly episodic, with the piano and orchestra frequently playing opposite each other rather than in collaboration. The second movement features uncharacteristically long, virtuosic solo sections for both violin and cello, at times making the movement seem like a piano trio. The sprightly, energetic third movement offers a more "typical" approach to concerto writing, with the piano and orchestra highlighted in more of a joint venture. Pianist Konstantin Scherbakov, with Dmitry Yablonsky and the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra, offer utterly magnificent performances of the Second Concerto along with the equally lesser-known Concert Fantasy. Scherbakov's playing switches easily between muscular and athletic to sensitive and refined -- dichotomous traits that are absolutely essential for the successful execution of this very demanding concerto. Anyone unfamiliar with these works should let this album be an introduction to them. © TiVo
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Classical - Released December 17, 1990 | Naxos

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Classical - Released June 16, 1998 | Naxos

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Classical - Released May 7, 2013 | Naxos

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Classical - Released February 5, 1988 | Naxos

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Classical - Released July 3, 2012 | Naxos

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Opera - Released January 25, 2003 | Naxos

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Keyboard Concertos - Released April 18, 2002 | Naxos

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Classical - Released December 4, 2012 | Naxos

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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 27, 2008 | Naxos

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Classical - Released June 20, 1997 | Naxos

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Classical - Released October 11, 1993 | Naxos

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Classical - Released November 22, 1993 | Naxos

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Classical - Released March 21, 2006 | Naxos

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The best that can be said of this recording by Theodore Kuchar and the National Symphony Orchestra of the Ukraine of Tchaikovsky's least-known symphonic poems plus dances from his least-known operas is that is, far and away, the best recording of any of these works ever made. As they have shown in their recordings of the symphonies of Prokofiev and Lyatoshinsky, Kuchar and the Kiev orchestra make a marvelous team: they give him characterful, powerful playing and he gives them strong, inspired direction and together they seem capable of performing just about anything and performing it with insight and brilliance. The proof is this recording. While there are few recordings to compete with Kuchar and the Ukrainians in Tchaikovsky's poorly composed Fatum and Voyevoda -- the ill-fated Eliahu Inbal for Philips and the misguided Antal Dorati for Decca in the stereo age, and the misbegotten Mikhail Pletnev for Deutsche Grammophon in the digital age -- Kuchar and the Ukrainians bring more conviction to their incoherencies, more passion to their banalities and more flamboyance to their inanities. Similarly, in the dances from five of Tchaikovsky's early operas, Kuchar and the Kirov get more fire, more lift and more wit out of the music than any previous recording and more than some would have thought possible. For listeners looking to fill the nooks and crannies of their Tchaikovsky collection, this disc will be just the thing. Naxos' sound is open and direct if a bit too close and a tad too dry. © TiVo