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Rock - Released November 22, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released June 14, 2011 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released June 28, 2011 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Jazz - Released September 10, 2013 | Valiana - Songsurfer

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Rock - Released September 12, 2005 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released November 22, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2011 | Varese Sarabande

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Electronic - Released June 14, 2013 | Ultra Records, LLC

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Pop - Released January 1, 1998 | Paul McCartney Catalog

Following the path of ambient-techno into more free-form territory, Youth and McCartney deliver a second album that trades the midtempo beats for slow-moving workouts heavy on the electronics, though a few guitars do see their way into the mix. © Keith Farley /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 20, 2018 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Pop - Released April 17, 1970 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released November 6, 2007 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 2014 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Paul McCartney Catalog

When the mysterious Fireman album came out, it was largely ignored until rumors started floating that somehow Paul McCartney was involved with the project, à la Percy "Thrills" Thrillington's easy listening version of Ram in 1977. Capitol Records finally confirmed the rumors, with the result that a good number of aging Beatles fans bought their very first (and likely only) ambient house record. The thing is, it's a bit disingenuous to say that Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest is a Paul McCartney record in the strictest sense. The album's provenance is in a remix session for the first single from McCartney's Off the Ground album, "Hope of Deliverance." Ever mindful of current chart trends, McCartney invited former Killing Joke bassist and ambient house pioneer Youth to remix the track. In the course of four days in McCartney's studio in October 1992, Youth deconstructed the entire Off the Ground album into samples and created nine different mixes, incorporating material from new recordings by McCartney, old demos, found sound tapes, and even samples of the tracks "Reception" and "The Broadcast" from 1979's Back to the Egg. The performances are by McCartney, true, but it's Youth's sampling and remix skills that created the album. Youth later said that, had he realized at the time that McCartney was going to eventually release all nine tracks as a single album, he would have varied the proceedings a bit more. And that's the one flaw with this album; since all of the tracks have the same source material, they all sound more alike than they might otherwise. The tracks are solid ambient dance material, with beats and wisps of melody swirling around each other without ever quite coalescing into a recognizable tune, but there's a little bit too much sameness about the material for Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest to really hold together as an album the way that, say, the Orb's material does. The much more varied 1998 follow-up, Rushes, would be a far superior release. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2018 | Virgin EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2000 | Paul McCartney Catalog

The hype mill, stoked in part by McCartney himself, promoted this CD as nothing less than a posthumous chapter in the Beatles' saga ("a new little piece of Beatles," in Paul's words). Nonsense, for this is really just the latest of McCartney's excursions into electronica, an interest of his that dates back to the Beatles' boundary-shredding experiments with musique concrète and the Moog synthesizer in the 1960s. It is a series of five electronic collages, with occasional eruptions of a new tune called "Free Now" (actually a catchy repetitive riff, no more or less), sounds of the auto tunnel under the Mersey, pieces of strange off-the-cuff interviews conducted by Paul on the Liverpool streets (he asks, disingenuously, "What do you think of the Beatles?"), snippets of a chorale from his Liverpool Oratorio -- and yes, some Beatle talk from the 1965 sessions for "Think for Yourself." All of the tracks are given separately distributed credits to McCartney, the Beatles, the group Super Furry Animals, and Youth -- his collaborator in previous electronica projects -- but in fact, the whole hour-long CD is of a single piece. The most effective segment is the one credited solely to Youth (bearing the unwieldy title "Real Gone Dub Made in Manifest in the Vortex of the Eternal Now"), where the pitchless electronic sounds are at their wildest and the disembodied Beatles voices and ghostly choruses are hauntingly adrift in a high-tech netherworld. As a listening experience, it is at least as casually absorbing as McCartney's two Fireman albums -- and it grows on you, provided that you drop any expectations of this being a long-lost Beatles album. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1991 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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