Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg has received renewed attention, especially as the centenary year of his birth in 2019 approached. He has hardly received better advocacy than he gets here from the sensational young conductor Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla in her first recording for Deutsche Grammophon, and first as conductor of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Weinberg lost most of his family in the Holocaust; he himself fled to the Soviet Union, where he wasn't exactly well treated, but survived and became closely acquainted with Shostakovich. The two mutually influenced each other, but it is surprising how individual Weinberg's style remained. The Symphony No. 21, Op. 152 ("Kaddish") was worked at by Weinberg for some time and was completed in 1991, a few years before his death. The work is dedicated to the victims of the Warsaw Ghetto in World War II and has the feeling of a personal memorial. It is almost unrelievedly grim, although it has an episodic quality deriving partly from its association with a film about the ghetto. You would not pick the youthful Gražinytė-Tyla as an interpreter, but this is an extraordinary reading. The finale has a kind of wordless keening for soprano, which Gražinytė-Tyla takes herself. There is no way to know what Weinberg had in mind for the work, but the effect of her chorister's voice is extraordinary here. A factor adding a personal quality to the performance is the presence of violinist Gidon Kremer, who has championed Weinberg's music, and who here appears not only as the leader of his Kremerata Baltica in Weinberg's Symphony No. 2 for string orchestra, Op. 30, but also takes the violin solo part in the Symphony No. 21. It is as though the Weinberg baton was being handed on to the next generation. The Symphony No. 2 itself is an elegant string serenade that draws more on interwar Czech and Polish music than it does on Shostakovich. The work of Kremerata Baltica and the CBSO here seems almost to mesh, and this is an extraordinary debut overall. How is Gražinytė-Tyla going to follow it up? © TiVo
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released February 5, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason découverte - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - La Clef du mois RESMUSICA
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released April 3, 2012 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - La Clef du mois RESMUSICA
The continuing emergence of the music of Polish-born Russian composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg is cause for celebration. Weinberg did not lack for Soviet champions even in the era of his mentor Shostakovich, whose music his own somewhat resembles. A certain deadly serious tone is common to both, but Weinberg's personality is different; it's less epic, although his orchestral canvas is as large as Shostakovich's. He wrote 26 symphonies, many of which are just receiving their first recordings in the West, with several ongoing series underway. This recording of the Symphony No. 6, Op. 79 (1963), reveals an interesting work but may not be a good starting place except for Russian speakers. The work is in five movements, with a children's choir intoning texts by various poets that form a life narrative from innocence to (this being the middle of the 20th century) mass catastrophe to hope. This is not something Shostakovich would have come up with, and Vladimir Lande, leading the St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra and Glinka Choral College Boys' Choir, keeps Weinberg's lines moving along. A major problem for non-Russophones is that Naxos goes on the cheap here, including no texts (not even online, their usual procedure) at all. The Rhapsody on Moldavian Themes, Op. 47/1, composed in 1949, doesn't make a persuasive opener, either; this wandering work contains ideas that were done more tightly by any number of other composers, notably Kodály, the primary model. Russian music enthusiasts will celebrate the appearance of any competent performance of music by the underrated Weinberg, but the average listener will do better with one of the Weinberg recordings by Thord Svedlund and the Gothenburg Symphony on the Chandos label. © TiVo
HI-RES£16.99
CD£12.49

Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
 
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - La Clef du mois RESMUSICA
Thanks in part to the efforts of conductor Vladimir Lande and the St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra, featured here, the large orchestral output of Polish-born Russian composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg is getting a second look. During his career he faced many of the same issues Shostakovich did, but his musical solutions to those issues are often different and quite fresh. Like Shostakovich, he went through enforced phases of trying to please Soviet authority, and the two works on this album seem to belong to one of those phases. The Symphony No. 19, Op. 142 ("Bright May"), is the more interesting work. The title refers not to the 1917 May revolution but to the Soviet Union's final victory over Nazi Germany in May 1945. You might not guess that that was the topic if you listened to the work cold; the extremely variegated first movement mixes triumphant passages in brass with pastoral scenes, as if the composer were surveying a devastated landscape. The movement ends in great uncertainty, and that mood pervades the entire symphony. The work doesn't have the memorable tunes that Shostakovich offers, but it has a style of its own. The shorter tone poem The Banners of Peace, Op. 143, dates from the same year; it is a more bombastic work whose conclusion, even annotator Richard Whitehouse concedes, is most notable for "its evident lack of irony." The orchestra, made up of players for whom stuff like this was written, does quite well, and those who have discovered Weinberg along the way will find the music interesting. Those who want to sample this composer, though, might try one of the earlier symphonies released in Naxos' series devoted to his music. © TiVo
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released September 14, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
As Mieczyslaw Weinberg's massive orchestral output becomes better known, performances with profound insights and first-rate playing are steadily increasing. With this 2018 Naxos release of world premiere recordings of the Symphony No. 13, Op. 115 (1976) and the Serenade, Op. 47, No. 4 (1952), Vladimir Lande and the Siberian State Symphony Orchestra mark their sixth Weinberg release for the label, and continue an impressive series that has yielded six of his 22 symphonies with as many short works as filler, thus presenting both his serious symphonic essays and less formal pieces that represent a variety of styles and expressions. Dedicated to the memory of Weinberg's mother, the dominant mood of the Symphony No. 13 is elegiac, and though the middle section displays aggression and sustained tension, the framing outer sections depend on long, brooding melodies and subdued dissonant counterpoint to communicate a haunted mood in the vein of Shostakovich's late music. In contrast, the Serenade is almost shockingly cheerful, bursting with hummable melodies and rustic dances that at times evoke a sardonic mood, as in the second movement, and a poignant side, as in the third movement's wistful themes. Easily digestible and not requiring a huge time commitment, this album is an excellent introduction to Weinberg's music, and may motivate listeners to look for Lande's earlier recordings of this burgeoning repertoire. © TiVo
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released January 7, 2014 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£5.75£14.38(60%)
CD£3.83£9.58(60%)

Chamber Music - Released March 13, 2020 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
Mieczysław Weinberg was familiar with the clarinet from his youth, given its prominent place in klezmer bands and theatre ensembles, and he wrote three works specifically for the instrument. In the Clarinet Concerto he draws a wide range of textures from the accompanying strings, over which the soloist explores the clarinet’s extremes of register in virtuosic fashion. Despite having been written when Weinberg was still in his mid-twenties, the Clarinet Sonata is a mature work with Romantic and folkloric elements. His last completed work was the Chamber Symphony No. 4, an impassioned piece with a wrenching chorale theme and role for obbligato clarinet. © Naxos
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£2.92£7.29(60%)
CD£2.32£5.79(60%)

Chamber Music - Released September 13, 2019 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
The East-West Chamber Orchestra is the resident orchestra of the Yuri Bashmet International Music Festival and is made up of concertmasters from leading orchestras and competition laureates. On this, their debut recording, they celebrate the centenary of Mieczysław Weinberg’s birth. Weinberg’s Chamber Symphonies reflect his creativity and the dramatic times in which he lived - the formal lucidity and directness of the First and the elegiac Third - both derived from string quartets composed in the shadow of the Second World War. © Naxos
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Violin Solos - Released March 1, 2019 | Accentus Music

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte
The Polish Jewish-born Mieczyslaw Weinberg made his way to Moscow during World War II and was lucky enough to have his music championed by Shostakovich during one of the latter's government-approved periods. His music sounds a bit like that of Shostakovich (sample, perhaps, the beginning of the 21st prelude here), but he generally has his own voice. Weinberg wrote these preludes for cello (for Mstislav Rostropovich, who never performed them), and they have occasionally been recorded in that form; the violin transcription here by Latvian star Gidon Kremer squeezes the original work's broad range but also adds a level of virtuosity on the high notes that wasn't there originally. The 24 preludes do not form a set in all the major and minor keys as do those of Bach or Chopin, and they're perhaps more etudes than preludes, each of them exploring a little technique or motif. Combined with Kremer's brilliance, this creates a slightly mysterious effect, as if you are hearing an impassioned speech in an unfamiliar language. They are entirely unlike the Shostakovich preludes for piano, and there is nothing of the neo-classic about them although they are tonally organized. Although the pieces are quite short, they have a personal quality. The Accentus label, going full ECM with its black-and-white-photo-on-gray graphics, does a wonderful job sonically at the Paliesiaus Dvaras, apparently a small hotel, in Lithuania; the violin has an almost tactile quality. A nice find for those who know Weinberg only through his symphonies, or not at all. © TiVo
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 1, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica
With the general increase in the popularity of Dmitry Shostakovich's music, that of his protégé Mieczyslaw Weinberg has also been gaining a hearing outside the former East Bloc. A Polish-born Jew, Weinberg survived two waves of Nazi invasion only to find himself buffeted by the same political forces as Shostakovich, by then his mentor, in the postwar Soviet Union. The Cello Concerto in C minor, Op. 43, dating from 1948, is parallel to Shostakovich's works of enforced conservatism from that period, but is somehow more joyful and genuinely melodic. More interesting is the Symphony No. 20, Op. 150, written in 1988 and here receiving its premiere recording. It's a roughly symmetrical five-movement work, on a large orchestral canvas, with slow movements with continuous melody on the outside, scherzo-like pieces of contrasting character second and fourth, and an extremely unusual centerpiece that seems to lose its integrity as it goes along. Weinberg in his later years seems to have tried to pursue avenues suggested by Shostakovich's very personal late works, and this piece, down to the Mahlerian feel, is in that vein. It's not Shostakovich, but it's quite absorbing, and the performances by Sweden's Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra are clean and on top of Weinberg's long lines in the outer movements of the symphony. A strong entry in the catalog of a composer on the rise. © TiVo
CD£9.58

Chamber Music - Released March 10, 2017 | Naxos

Booklet
CD£7.99

Classical - Released July 3, 2020 | CPO

Booklet
Mieczysław Weinberg, a composer whose extraordinarily prolix repertoire contains over five hundred works, has been resurfacing over the years after being lost to history. Born in Warsaw in 1919, Weinberg suffered the brunt of Hitler’s hatred and had to flee to the USSR, but his entire family remained behind and were subsequently killed in Nazi concentration camps. He was soon forced to flee once again, this time hiding in Uzbekistan, where he was supported by Shostakovich but was still the victim of anti-Semitic persecution. The power of Weinberg’s music was recognised by many great Soviet musicians who then spread the word in the 1960s for others to play it. He died in great poverty in Moscow, 1996, due to ill health. As the number of musicians performing his works has increased in recent years, his musical stature has now risen to the same level as that of Shostakovich and Bartók. The works recorded here are part of an edition devoted to cello concertos composed by exiled Jewish composers, under the patronage of English cellist Raphael Wallfisch. Written in 1948 and premiered by Rostropovich, the meditative, sombre and tense Cello Concerto, Op. 43, gradually integrated itself into the repertoire of a new generation of performers. The Concertino, which was composed the same year in record time, wasn’t premiered until 2017 and merges Jewish folklore with Polish folk music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
HI-RES£28.99
CD£20.99

Classical - Released February 7, 2014 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 3, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
This release by the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, not under music director Gustavo Dudamel but under the highly capable Thord Svedlund, is part of a series on the Chandos label devoted to the orchestral music of the Polish-born Soviet composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg. Weinberg was more obedient to the whims of Soviet cultural commissars than was his contemporary and friend Dmitry Shostakovich, but he nevertheless ran afoul of officialdom, probably because of the strong anti-Semitic streak of the Stalinist state. His music is expertly written and reflects many of the same currents as Shostakovich's. The Symphony No. 3 in B minor, Op. 45, was composed in 1949, right after the second denunciation of Shostakovich the previous year. Weinberg's response to such strictures was less edgy than that of his friend, but the score, packed full of folk tunes from various regions, is consistently attractive. The real find here may be the Suite No. 4 from The Golden Key, Op. 55d, a ballet with elements of the Pinocchio story. These sparkling pieces (hear the three animal dances in the middle, tracks 8-10) sound like lost Prokofiev gems, and in fact you might try them out in a blind listening test on Prokofiev enthusiasts. They'd be ideal for concerts directed at young people. Chandos continues to back the Weinberg series with excellent Super Audio sound that favors every part of the composer's vast orchestral palette. The biggest objection here may be that the entire program clocks in at under 50 minutes; other music from the ballet, at the very least, could have been included. © TiVo
HI-RES£14.99
CD£12.99

Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Chamber Music - Released March 13, 2020 | CD Accord

Hi-Res Booklet
CD£7.99

Quartets - Released September 6, 2011 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason