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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 4, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

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Classical - Released July 31, 2020 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Experimental - Released January 27, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 4, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released March 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Though the eight-hour work Sleep is one of the longest single pieces of classical music ever composed and the audience at its premiere were given beds instead of seats, Max Richter's intentions for the work were anything but sensational. Describing it as “an eight-hour personal lullaby for a frenetic world and a manifesto for a slower pace of existence," he consulted neuroscientist David Eagleman as he worked on these soft, gliding compositions for piano, strings, electronics and vocals, taking into account the nuances of dreaming sleep and deep sleep. Designed to be listened to while asleep, the low drones that wind through the work encourage a phase of sleep that consolidates memory and learning -- a process that might seem as thrilling as defragmenting a hard drive, but in Richter's hands, has the same aching-yet-inspiring beauty that has graced his work since The Blue Notebooks. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 19, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 4, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 11, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

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This release by French-Canadian violinist Angèle Dubeau falls into a category that hardly existed at the turn of the century, but now has grown increasingly common: the solo recording devoted to music by minimalist composers. These have grown more common, but Dubeau and her all-female ensemble La Pietà have made it into something of a specialty, releasing albums devoted to John Adams, Arvo Pärt, Philip Glass, and Ludovico Einaudi. This one, taking up music by Max Richter, adds a sort of double wrinkle, for some of Richter's compositions are based on (or, to use his word, "recomposed") existing works, some quite familiar. Thus making a violin version is a sort of double recomposition. This said, the album is consistent with what Dubeau has done in the past. A major unsung contributor is her co-arranger François Vallières; the two neatly answer the question of how you can make a virtuoso violin album out of the generally basic, melodic material of minimalism. Dubeau's violin weaves gracefully around the ensemble, sometimes barely audible, sometimes coming more to the foreground, sometimes adding an eerie element with harmonics. What you're getting here is ambient, minimalist textures, with little variety in mood and tempo, but the effects are quite subtle within this frame. You could try this out if you've seen Dubeau's recordings notching strong sales in Canada and elsewhere, and have wondered what they're all about. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 7, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Max Richter embarks on many scoring projects -- most prominently, his music for the award-winning Israeli film Waltz with Bashir -- and it’s easy to hear why: albums such as The Blue Notebooks and Memoryhouse feel like, as the cliché about instrumental music goes, soundtracks for films that haven’t been made yet (though a piece from The Blue Notebooks was even used in the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island). Like Bashir, an animated documentary about the 1982 Lebanon war, Infra is another high-concept project, a ballet inspired by T.S. Eliot's classic poem of yearning and regret, The Waste Land. In turn, Richter's score, which was originally 25 minutes but is expanded to 32 here, was influenced by Schubert's Winterreise. Even in its longer form, many of Infra's pieces are brief, recalling the brilliant miniatures of Richter's ringtone album 24 Postcards in Full Colour. Infra's palette is classic Richter, blending piano, brass, and a string quartet with electronic textures that span luminous washes to ghostly static that lends an alien quality, almost as if the listener is tuning into the score’s frequencies. Like The Waste Land, this music is subtle, its open-ended glimpses adding to its poignancy. Richter shows once again that he’s a master of conveying the maximum amount of emotions with the minimum amount of music: “Journey 4”'s melody teeters between despair and reassurance with almost every note. Despite -- or perhaps because of -- Infra's subtlety, it offers a wide-open backdrop for dancing. “Infra 8”'s tender swirls and “Infra 2”'s complementary arcs of strings and electronics suggest steps that flow or scuttle like a pair of ragged claws. Whether Richter explores abstract drones as on “Journey 3,” reminds listeners of what a sensitive player he is on piano-driven pieces such as “Journey 1” and “Infra 3,” or unites the work’s elements on major pieces like “Infra 5” and “Infra 7,” he does so with a masterful restraint that gives Infra's slate-gray moods maximum impact. This may be the most subdued of Richter's Fat Cat releases, but every nuance shows the care with which he crafts all of his music. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 1, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 15, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 5, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2016 | EuropaCorp

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Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Three Worlds – Music from Woolf Works presents music from Woolf Works, an award-winning ballet triptych that reunited Max Richter with his Infra collaborator, choreographer Wayne McGregor. Like Infra, which paid tribute to T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Schubert's Winterreise, Woolf Works is an homage to three of Virginia Woolf's greatest novels: Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, and The Waves. And, like his previous collaboration with McGregor, Three Worlds is a striking testament to how eloquently Richter translates the work of an artist working in another medium into compelling music. As he captures the depth and breadth of the worlds Woolf created with her writing, he reflects on his own body of work. Following an excerpt of "Craftsmanship," the only surviving recording of Woolf's voice (and another reminder of how deftly Richter combines spoken word and found sounds into his music), Three Worlds begins with Dalloway-inspired pieces. The interplay of strings and piano on "Meeting Again" is quintessentially Richter, the tension between structure and aching emotions echoing his breakthrough The Blue Notebooks; meanwhile, the flowing sweetness of "In the Garden"is filled with as many poignant details as the novel that inspired it. Later, "War Anthem" evokes the novel's tragic World War I veteran Septimus Smith with its distant -- but still ominous -- drums. Richter's flair for incorporating electronics into his music comes to the fore on the Orlando portion of Three Worlds, arguably the album's most exciting stretch. He echoes the daring, unexpected life of the novel's gender-swapping protagonist with short, brisk pieces that move with too much purpose to be merely whimsical: "Modular Astronomy" sounds like it's streaking through time and space, while the arpeggios on "The Genesis of Poetry" trace clearly defined arcs. The Orlando pieces also show off Richter's impressive range, spanning the echoing drones of "Morphology" and the elegantly futuristic mesh of electronics and strings on "The Explorers." This part of Three Worlds could easily be an album in its own right, something that could also be said of its final section, The Waves. Prefaced by a reading of Woolf's suicide note by Gillian Anderson, "Tuesday" closes the album with slowly unfolding strings, brass, and vocals that are somehow unsettling in their steadiness, mirroring the concept of shared consciousness in the novel. While the album's finale may lose something without the ballet's visuals, it's still striking. Coming after the epic length and ambition of Sleep, Three Worlds could seem like a more minor work, but in its own right, it's another triumphant reminder of Richter's brilliance as a translator and creator. © Heather Phares /TiVo

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Max Richter in the magazine