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Symphonies - Released January 2, 1980 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 13, 2015 | Reference Recordings

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 10, 2017 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month
This is the third instalment in François-Frédéric Guy’s traversal of Beethoven and the first to delve into the chamber music. He is well matched in intellect, musicianship and temperament by cellist Xavier Phillips as they journey from the ridiculous (the Variations on ‘See the Conqu’ring Hero Comes’, in which Guy dispatches the virtuoso piano part with complete aplomb, to delectable effect) to the sublime (the Op 102 Sonatas). The two sets of variations on themes from Mozart’s Magic Flute are a very different proposition from the ‘Conqu’ring Hero’ but just as persuasive, with the Op 66 set given a particularly sparkling reading. Competition is of course thick on the ground, not least from Isserlis and Levin (playing a tremendously characterful McNulty fortepiano), which was an obvious choice for Record of the Month in February 2014. But Phillips and Guy deserve that accolade just as richly and their utterly different sound world is equally riveting.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | 2L

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Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Steinway and Sons

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Ludwig van Beethoven's Diabelli Variations, Op. 120 was his greatest masterpiece for the piano, and its 33 variations on a simple waltz transcended the extraordinary keyboard works that preceded it, including his other sets of variations, bagatelles, and the 32 piano sonatas. Composed between 1819 and 1823, contemporaneously with the Missa Solemnis, it was published as the first volume of Anton Diabelli's Vaterländischer Künstlerverein. Diabelli had asked the leading composers of Europe to compose a single variation on his original theme, and he collected examples from Carl Czerny, Franz Schubert, Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Ignaz Moscheles, a young Franz Liszt, Franz Xaver Mozart, and Archduke Rudolf of Austria, among many others, but Beethoven's monumental contribution exceeded them all. The Diabelli Variations are regarded as a summation of Beethoven's methods of composition, and it requires an experienced pianist to communicate its myriad connections to all that went before, perhaps most significantly to the late piano sonatas, which it most closely resembles in tone, breadth, inventiveness, spiritual depth, and emotional impact. John O'Conor's 2016 release for Steinway & Sons offers a spontaneous and fluid performance that ranges in expression from humorous and mercurial in the early variations, to profound and awe-inspiring from the midpoint on, and he displays a fine balance between vigorous virtuosity and sublime restraint. Steinway & Sons provide clean and crisp sound, so all the details and nuances in O'Conor's sensitive playing are easily heard. Highly recommended, especially for fans of this amazing piece.
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Chamber Music - Released September 21, 2018 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

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Classical - Released June 1, 2013 | VIVAT

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The listener wanting a recording of Beethoven's first group of string quartets, published together as Op. 18, has dozens of choices, but this group of three by Britain's ever-changing Allegri String Quartet lies toward one extreme of the range. Whereas many ensembles stress the places where Beethoven begins to push against the boundaries of the Classical style he inherited from Haydn and Mozart, the Allegri takes a different tack: its readings are balanced, homogeneous, and startlingly quiet. Sharp expressions are smoothed out rather than highlighted, and the quartet's playing aims at a kind of static quality that is very unusual in this music. Straightforward tunes, of which there are plenty in these pieces, are very gracefully rendered, and the overall effect is almost hypnotic. It can be very beautiful, but there's the nagging feeling that Beethoven, used to a very different bow and string sound, would have found it a bit odd. This is especially true of the String Quartet in C minor, Op. 18/4, which is generally played in such a way as to stress its links to Beethoven's later works in that key. Sample the opening movement of the String Quartet in D major, Op. 18/3, actually Beethoven's first published quartet, for the full effect, and if you like it, proceed. The crystalline acoustics of Britain's Menuhin Hall are in perfect sync with the players' musical intentions.
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Classical - Released March 17, 2017 | Accentus Music

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Classical - Released September 1, 2014 | Naxos Japan

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Classical - Released March 4, 2016 | NKB Record

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