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Quartets - Released October 11, 2019 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - Qobuzissime
Six quartets: six works that are key to understanding what Joseph Haydn brought to western music. This effort by the Quatuor Hanson is particularly successful because they are past masters in constructing and expressing the soul of this subtle art. And what's more, they bring it off with a fascinating level of instrumental skill. Listening to this piece, we have to bow down once again before the genius of a composer who, along with Boccherini, invented a new genre and immediately studded it with masterpieces of staggering quality. Judiciously picked out from among Haydn's vast corpus, these six quartets are touching both in their expressiveness and in the perfection of their writing. Not a single note out of place, a perfect balance of four voices and inspired right from the first moment up to the incomplete closing Opus 77, which was a contemporary of Beethoven's first Quartets, Op. 18 – works that betray the lessons their writer learned from his master. More than two hundred years after his death, Haydn has only just found recognition as one of the greats, although he had been accorded that status during his life. But his works for keyboards, the symphonies, the oratorios, and to a lesser extent, the operas, speak in his favour. More than a forerunner, Haydn is a founder, a genius whose influence was felt by those who came after him, foremost amongst whom Beethoven and Schubert. This splendid album puts him (back) in his rightful place. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released March 30, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
Perhaps one of classical music's least noted but most important stories of the new millennium has been the profusion of recordings of Haydn's keyboard sonatas, each as different from the others as are the major schools of playing Beethoven, if not more so. Part of the reason for the variety is that, as French pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet points out here, Haydn's manuscripts contained very little in the way of interpretive markings, leaving the field open for future performers and editors. Bavouzet, operating in the sonically superb environment of Suffolk, England's Potton Hall and playing a modern Yamaha, nevertheless adopts the fruits of historical research in his approach. He takes the repeats and heavily ornaments them, without, however, drawing attention to himself in the process. More generally, his tone is clean, very quiet, and rather harpsichord-like. In the slow movements of these four middle-period sonatas he's low-key indeed, but his playing holds up under attentive listening; his playing successfully draws the listener into an intimate space. Bavouzet's readings generally have the sort of Haydn X factor that leaves the listener completely unsure of what's coming next. Strongly recommended and whets the appetite for other albums in the occasional series that Bavouzet promises is coming. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 20, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
After celebrating thirty years of life and work together with the Trios by Dvořak, our three wandering companions (Vincent Coq, piano, Jean-Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin and Raphaël Pidoux, cello) have brought out another round of Trios, this time by Joseph Haydn, the inventor of this form, which is an inheritor of the baroque trio sonata, with a cello part often providing the basso continuo. There are 39 authentic compositions by Haydn for this instrumental format, which he wrote at various points throughout his life. The music is of very high quality and it unites all the characteristic forms of his style, his vivacity, expression, freedom of tone and form, and the zest of his cheering humour. The Wanderers have judiciously selected their works from three different epochs for this new album which offers the Trios n° 14, 18, 21, 26 & 31 which offer plenty of surprises and rare tonalities from Haydn, like A-flat major, F-sharp minor, or E-flat minor. The performance is both fluent and lucid. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Quartets - Released March 10, 2014 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet + Video Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released April 13, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
The vagaries of the market have led a French pianist to record all his albums in England (Jean-Efflam Bavouzet for Chandos) whereas an English pianist, Paul Lewis, recorded all of his for the French label Harmonia Mundi. They both share a real love of Haydn. While the Frenchman has been recording sonatas by the Austrian composer from the start, Paul Lewis waited until he had assimilated Beethoven's 32 Sonatas and Schubert's as well, so as to be able to get to the root of the repertoire. For his first album dedicated solely to Haydn, he has chosen four sonatas, 32, 40, 49, and 50, allowing him to deploy his whole expressive range, dispelling once and for all the "Papa Haydn" tag that has for so long dogged the great musical innovator. In Paul Lewis's hands, Haydn's music is not that of an ancestor, however good, but of a Viennese classicist, performed with great nuance, a fluid sound and a wonderful, plastic beauty which makes the keyboard sing, underlining Haydn's joyful and puckish side as well as his passing melancholy. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 22, 2016 | deutsche harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released January 19, 2018 | L'Encelade

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | BnF Collection

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Golden Oldies
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Classical - Released October 17, 2017 | NoMadMusic

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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | RUBICON

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The Jubilee Quartet, formed in 2006 and named so as all the members lived along the route London’s Jubilee underground line, have studied with such illustrious figures from the world of chamber music as Gunter Pichler, Thomas Brandis, Garfield Jackson and the Belcea String Quartet. They have participated in masterclasses with the Skampa, Wihan and Chilingirian Quartets. They have an impressive tally of prizes from international chamber music competitions and have a busy international schedule. Their debut album features three Haydn quartets which, as ever with this composer are brim-full of innovation, drama and wide-ranging emotions. © Rubicon
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Classical - Released November 1, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released April 20, 2019 | Les Belles Ecouteuses

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Classical - Released February 23, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released September 2, 2013 | Coro

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The partnership between British early music conductor Harry Christophers and the venerable American Handel and Haydn Society ensemble has worked out well for all concerned. The Society has been well entrenched in Boston's cultural life since Beethoven's day (they commissioned an oratorio from him at one point), but it has had only a fitful relationship with the recording industry. With Christophers, H&H gets the benefit of the house label of his wildly successful choral ensemble, the Sixteen. Christophers, for his part, gets to stretch forward into the Classical era like many of his early music contemporaries, with a precise and tonally pleasant ensemble at his command. The result here is a trio of Haydn works, never less than competently executed. The highlight is the Violin Concerto in G major, Hob. 7a/4, where the vivacious playing of soloist Aisslinn Nosky contrasts nicely with Christophers' reserved style. That reserved style also serves the Symphony No. 6 in D major, Hob. 1/6, quite well; this early work, with its muted colors depicting morning, somehow comes off differently with each new conductor who essays it. The Symphony No. 82 in C major, Hob. 1/82 ("L'ours," or The Bear), may be deadpan for some; if you like, say, Thomas Fey's cycle of Haydn symphonies (or for that matter older full-symphony readings), give a listen to some samples here. The sound environment of Boston's Symphony Hall is a major attraction in itself. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 2, 2009 | Challenge Classics

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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | Sony Classical

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The optimism and positivity that breathes through the work of Joseph Haydn was bound to attract Leonard Bernstein, who performed numerous recordings of the great Austrian composer’s symphonies, both in New York and Vienna. While these interpretations aren’t “historically informed” per se, they do perfectly reveal the “spirit” of this music, with energetic tempos, a fair dose of humour and constant vibrancy. The Symphony No. 88 in G major follows the six Paris Symphonies, which it is an extension from. Writing it, Haydn had French audiences in mind and had in fact entrusted its publication to a Parisian editor. This symphony has always been a favourite among conductors, most likely because of the clarty of its writing and its final movement, which is very academic in writing and yet so popular in tone, with a main theme that irrevocably sticks to the listeners’ heads. A video shows Bernstein interpreting this Finale in Vienna, maliciously letting the orchestra play on its own while performing irresistible gestures and mimics. The Symphony No. 102 was part of the twelve London Symphonies. Several critics underlined how much the first movement inspired Beethoven in his own symphonies. The Adagio that follows has a certain sadness about it, so rare with Haydn, who regains his joyful mood for a brilliant Finale, in which burlesque elements are designed to amuse the audience. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | Sony Classical

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