Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Solo Piano - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
HI-RES£17.99
CD£11.99

Sacred Oratorios - Released October 2, 2015 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The entire creation of the world in an hour a quarter… it had to be through Haydn’s extraordinary powers of concentration that this insane wager could possibly succeed; others would not even dare attempt it. The Creation, dating from 1798, is one of the most ultimate and powerful of Haydn’s masterpieces. The great composer was always a master of surprise, and his invention of the Big Bang in musical form – including an introduction proclaiming ‘And then there was light’ – is chorally orchestrated to phenomenal effect. The work also retains a wonderful description of the various creations of the Lord; the extravagant evocation of whales remains an intense moment of orchestral invention, and the score is full of a genius which Beethoven had merely tapped into… Philippe Herreweghe has chosen to focus on a certain transparency of place, rather than perpetuating the traditional, bombastic dramatic gestures of orchestras within the German sphere. And, thus, the score gains greater clarity.
HI-RES£9.49
CD£9.49

Symphonic Music - Released June 30, 2014 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£10.99
CD£9.49

Classical - Released March 24, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res
HI-RES£24.99
CD£17.99

Classical - Released September 2, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
CD£17.50£34.99(50%)

Quartets - Released October 7, 2014 | Arcana

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD£15.98

Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Profil

Booklet
HI-RES£17.99
CD£11.99

Secular Vocal Music - Released April 8, 2014 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released April 2, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pianiste Maestro - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£23.49
CD£20.49

Symphonic Music - Released August 6, 2007 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
This live recording of a group of Haydn's late masterworks lies at the intersection of several tales of trouble -- that of Simon Rattle's conductorship of the venerable Berlin Philharmonic, that of the EMI label's flagging fortunes and those of the classical recording industry in general, and that of the attempts of the massive symphony orchestras rooted in the nineteenth century to remain relevant in music written by composers who for the most part had no inkling of their existence. The results are, well, troubled. Rattle tries to borrow a page from the authentic-performance book, using a small group of strings with little vibrato and striving for transparent textures that reveal Haydn's wind and horn parts. The trouble is that he seems stuck in a 1970s conception of historical performance, apparently believing that it means interpretations that are restrained to the point of being pinched, yet at the same time outrageously unorthodox. A few hours of listening to the Haydn recordings of Thomas Fey and the Ensemble La Passione would have set him straight on the issue of restraint, but what you get here are recordings that, as flawlessly as the Berliners may play, are pretty lifeless. Hear the mushy, directionless slow introduction to the first movement of the Symphony No. 91 (CD 2, track 1), for example. Rattle's tinkering with the score (he has an odd way of making phrases back off dynamically in mid-utterance, robbing Haydn of his robust good cheer) largely fails to convince. His tempos are fast to the point of breakneck, destroying the minuets' fun-at-the-expense-of-the-courtiers mood and turning the great false endings of the Symphony No. 90 in C major into nervous, slightly unpleasant moments. That finale appears on disc 1 in two separate versions, one with the audience breaking mistakenly into applause (and then laughter) at the false ending, the other with the applause edited out (the timing of this one is way off in the track list, incidentally). This doesn't really come off, for on all the rest of the recordings audience sound of all kinds is ruthlessly edited out -- the applause, when it does happen, sounds like a horror film effect, and the eerie sonic backdrop sounds as though someone couldn't decide whether the recording was live or studio. There are good moments here -- the sly opening movement of the Sinfonia Concertante in B flat major, where Rattle's restraint becomes a virtue, and the detailed thinking-out of some of the development sections -- but the set as a whole is too clever by half.
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Symphonic Music - Released September 14, 2018 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles de Classica
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Symphonic Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released September 4, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
HI-RES£13.49
CD£8.99

Classical - Released April 8, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Although it is played on a period instrument, no one is arguing that this recording of Haydn's The Seven Last Words of Christ is historically authentic. The work, exceptionally in Haydn's output, exists in multiple versions, for orchestra, string quartet, chorus, and keyboard (either fortepiano or harpsichord). But surely Haydn did not have the instrument heard here, the rare tangent piano, in his head. This was, speaking roughly, a piano-harpsichord hybrid that never really found its footing in the late 18th century. As long as listeners are down with the idea of a fairly speculative recording, the effect of the tangent piano in this particular work is electrifying. Lubimov gets the best of both worlds: the intimacy of the keyboard version and the dynamic contrasts and timbral shadings of the orchestral original. The keyboard transcription is not by Haydn himself but was made in his own time, and he approved it. Lubimov works from this, tweaking it and adding contrasts that break up the seven consecutive slow movements and give them an extraordinarily expressive quality. Even when listeners know it's coming, the final Terremoto movement, depicting the earthquake following Christ's crucifixion, comes as a shock. Listeners will never hear the work quite the same way again after experiencing this recording, and even if Haydn didn't intend it this way, most may well end up wishing he had.
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | RUBICON

Hi-Res Booklet
The Jubilee Quartet, formed in 2006 and named so as all the members lived along the route London’s Jubilee underground line, have studied with such illustrious figures from the world of chamber music as Gunter Pichler, Thomas Brandis, Garfield Jackson and the Belcea String Quartet. They have participated in masterclasses with the Skampa, Wihan and Chilingirian Quartets. They have an impressive tally of prizes from international chamber music competitions and have a busy international schedule. Their debut album features three Haydn quartets which, as ever with this composer are brim-full of innovation, drama and wide-ranging emotions. © Rubicon
CD£6.99

Cello Concertos - Released May 26, 2014 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions Choc de Classica
HI-RES£9.99
CD£6.99

Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet
CD£78.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1991 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year - The Qobuz Ideal Discography