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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
“A great joy”: this is how Masaaki Suzuki considers this, his second recording of the St. Matthew’s Passion, made twenty years after the first one, in the Saitama Arts Theatre in Japan in April 2019 for the BIS label. A great opportunity to revisit the work, as in the elapsed time, the conductor and his orchestra have nearly completely recorded Bach’s choral music, including the complete masses and secular and sacred cantatas. As is his custom, Suzuki works with European soloists for this new recording, like the splendid young German tenor Benjamin Bruns, playing the stupendous part of the Evangelist. There are other familiar soloists that feature here, such as Carolyn Sampson, Damien Guillon, Makoto Sakurada and Christian Immler. There is nothing monumental about this new intimate and refined version, which follows the fateful narrative with great sobriety. There is nevertheless a fervent level of impulse, as well as a certain innocence within this resolutely pared back Lutheran perspective - there is never any real search for theatricality. The exceptional instrumental quality of the soloists of the Bach Collegium Japan and the soft touches of the two choral ensembles is also worth highlighting. © François Hudry / Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 3, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
After her acclaimed Pentatone debut with "Transfigured Night", Alisa Weilerstein returns with a complete recording of Bach’s Cello Suites. These pieces present the highest mountain to climb for any cellist, and one of the most transcendent and rewarding experiences for listeners alike. With his suites, Bach crafted - essentially without direct precedent - a body of solo cello music that forever defined the genre and brought the Baroque cello on par with its more popular cousin, the viola da gamba. Since Pablo Casals put them in the limelight again after 150 years of relative oblivion, Bach’s suites have become the alpha and omega for generations of cellists. To Weilerstein, the joy of this music - vibrant, contemporary, unquestionably alive - is the joy of discovery. Having heard and studied these pieces for years, she now entrusts her interpretation to the listener. © Pentatone
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Classical - Released October 6, 2014 | La Dolce Volta

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released August 24, 2012 | ECM New Series

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Classical - Released August 28, 2009 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released August 24, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Reissued for the first time in its entirety and magnificently restored by Christophe Hénault at his Art et Son studio in Annecy from the original soundtracks, this first complete Bach work signed by Marie-Claire Alain is of stunning beauty. Recorded between 1959 and 1967 on various historical instruments in Denmark, Sweden and Germany, this recording, described by the performer herself as "the most instinctive" of the three she recorded, benefits from remarkable sound recordings that perfectly showcase the instruments chosen by the great French organist. Fighting from her youth against the mathematical rigidity with which Bach's music was too often treated, she strove instead to release its vital energy, leaving aside an overly strong dialectic and countering the overly emotional. This great artist was well aware that organ music, and Bach's in particular, had to be modelled on each instrument used, adapting its playing, sound and technique to each occasion. "For each concert I give," she said, "I am obliged to rework each work according to the instrument I have at my disposal.»Disappeared on February 27, 2013 at the age of eighty-six, Marie-Claire Alain had put an end to her career in 2010 after having given more than 2,500 concerts and recorded 250 discs that still retain their great historical value. François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released October 1, 1993 | ECM New Series

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Classical - Released October 13, 2011 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released July 31, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 7, 2019 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Thirty years after his premature death, the American harpsichordist and organist Scott Ross is still present in the hearts of music lovers. His name remains attached to the marathon of 555 sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti he recorded on harpsichord for Disques Erato. It is out of this achievement that Scott Ross took on the task of recording the integrity of Johann Sebastian Bach’s works on keys (harpsichord and organ), but the great grim-reaper thought otherwise. This new homage-publication takes existing recordings and completes them with hitherto unseen material from French, Swiss and Canadian radios, including concerts and recordings on both harpsichord and organ. This disparate ensemble finds its coherence through the remastering of a wide range of sources by Christophe Hénault from Studio Art & Son. The happiness of experiencing the intense, fantastic and colourful joy of Scott Ross again will satisfy numerous admirers who will find him in solo, but also in duet with his old teacher Huguette Grémy-Chauliac and the Mosaïques ensemble under the direction of Christophe Coin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Pop - Released May 1, 2015 | Rhino

Minstrel in the Gallery was Tull's most artistically successful and elaborately produced album since Thick as a Brick and harked back to that album with the inclusion of a 17-minute extended piece ("Baker Street Muse"). Although English folk elements abound, this is really a hard rock showcase on a par with -- and perhaps even more aggressive than -- anything on Aqualung. The title track is a superb showcase for the group, freely mixing folk melodies, lilting flute passages, and archaic, pre-Elizabethan feel, and the fiercest electric rock in the group's history -- parts of it do recall phrases from A Passion Play, but all of it is more successful than anything on War Child. Martin Barre's attack on the guitar is as ferocious as anything in the band's history, and John Evan's organ matches him amp for amp, while Barriemore Barlow and Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond hold things together in a furious performance. Anderson's flair for drama and melody come to the fore in "Cold Wind to Valhalla," and "Requiem" is the loveliest acoustic number in Tull's repertory, featuring nothing but Anderson's singing and acoustic guitar, Hammond-Hammond's bass, and a small string orchestra backing them. "Nothing at All" isn't far behind for sheer, unabashed beauty, but "Black Satin Dancer" is a little too cacophonous for its own good. "Baker Street Muse" recalls Thick as a Brick and A Passion Play, not only in its structure but a few passages; at slightly under 17 minutes, it's a tad more manageable than either of its conceptual predecessors, and it has all of their virtues, freely overlapping hard rock and folk material, classical arrangements (some of the most tasteful string playing on a Tull recording), surprising tempo shifts, and complex stream-of-consciousness lyrics (some of which clearly veer into self-parody) into a compelling whole. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Farao Classics

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Classical - Released October 1, 1993 | Archiv Produktion

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Duets - Released November 6, 2020 | L'Encelade

Hi-Res Booklet
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) composed the six sonatas for keyboard and violin while he was in the service of Prince Leopold of Koethen (1717-1723), a period during which he focussed on composing secular instrumental music. These works were not written as sonatas for a melodic instrument and a basso continuo part performed on the keyboard, as was usually the case at that time - on the contrary, Bach composed these six sonatas as works for three voices, so they are true trio sonatas. One voice is allocated to the violin and two to the two hands on the keyboard, thus giving greater contrapuntal depth to the way that they are composed. This fresh take on these sonatas for keyboard and violin comes with an invitation to embark upon an organ-driven journey. The six sonatas have been broken down into three duos, each of which has been recorded using a different organ and violin combination, whilst at the same time remaining stylistically consistent with the types of instrument with which was Bach was familiar and which he himself played. The three organs are all in the East German style and the violin-makers who inspired the instruments used for the recordings were contemporaries of Bach. The programme also offers a seventh sonata for keyboard and violin (BWV 1028) which is far better known in its version for the viola de gamba. It also includes two less well-known violin and basso continuo sonatas by Bach, inspired by the Italian style, which allows the listener to get a better grasp of the difference between the two compositional models. Freddy Eichelberger has also chosen to introduce the works for keyboard and violin with solo organ pieces which act rather like preludes, thus highlighting the sonority of each of the instruments. In this boxset, which celebrates a thirty-year musical bond between Odile Edouard and Freddy Eichelberger, it is used a different organ and violin pairing, so three sites were selected, mainly because they had the right kinds of organ for the project and were easily accessible. These were the church of Saint-Louis de Saint Étienne (Haute-Loire), the Temple de Boudry (Switzerland) and the Temple du Foyer de l’Âme (Paris). © L'Encelade
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Classical - Released September 16, 2016 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 27, 2013 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Jazz pianist Keith Jarrett has recorded Bach before, on both piano and harpsichord. His interpretations are not jazz versions of Bach but are played straight. In this case you might say relatively straight, for Bach's sonatas for violin and keyboard, BWV 1014-1019, were written for a harpsichord and are generally played that way; somehow the ear is jarred more by the piano here than in Bach's solo keyboard music (which Jarrett has also recorded). Jarrett fans will find the evidence of his characteristic style not in rhythmic inflections toward jazz but in his way of sustaining notes, which is never excessive. As long as you agree to this rather unorthodox way of performing Bach, which 50 years ago would not have been unorthodox, you will enjoy this release. Jarrett, perhaps unsurprisingly for someone raised in the jazz tradition, is a sensitive ensemble player, and his work with violinist Michelle Makarski effectively puts the focus on her while nicely carving out a space for his own style. Too, Bach's pieces are unusual in that they were specifically for violin and harpsichord, not for violin and continuo; they make room for the keyboardist, and Jarrett fills it expressively and lyrically. The usual ECM bonus and minus, namely excellent sound and lack of any booklet material other than bad art photography, are both present, and on balance this is an unorthodox but effective Bach chamber-music release. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released April 25, 1988 | ECM New Series