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Pop - Released June 11, 2014 | Heaven and Stars Music

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released May 23, 2014 | Herzog Records

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Jazz - Released April 9, 2005 | IN+OUT Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Warner Records - Malpaso

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Jazz - Released February 4, 2014 | Harbinger Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2016 | Warner Music Philippines

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Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Warner Classics

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Electronic - Released August 28, 2020 | Fox-House-Records

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Pop/Rock - Released January 1, 1961 | Columbia - Legacy

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Classical - Released December 31, 2020 | Susan Holloway Music

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Rock - Released September 14, 2020 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

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Classical - Released May 1, 1996 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Pop - Released May 25, 2005 | Maverick

John Stevens was a contestant on the third season of American Idol -- the season that had a notable lack of male contestants. There was John -- cleverly nicknamed "Red" by millions, due to his red hair; Jon Peter Lewis, an enthusiastic, ironic dork who came along just a little bit too early to benefit from the Napoleon Dynamite zeitgeist; George Huff, a sweet and shy neo-soul singer; and Matthew Rogers, a barrel-chested ex-football player who wanted to be a soulman but gravitated toward country. Each of these four contestants -- who represented a third of the grand total of 12 finalists -- had their own niche, but Stevens stood out because he specialized in the Great American Songbook, which is a roundabout way of saying that he was a Frank Sinatra wannabe. Not only did he sing in a different style than the other contestants, but he was painfully shy, which made him quite endearing to a certain portion of the viewing audience who kept him around longer than his shaky vocals and inconsistent performances deserved. Stevens didn't win fans because of his voice -- it was OK, but it lacked warmth and depth, and he was far too mannered, borrowing heavily from Frank, Dean, Bobby Darin, and, especially, how Harry Connick, Jr. synthesized all of those singers when Stevens was a toddler -- but he won fans because he was a unique television personality. He was a scared, sweet kid who won the hearts of young girls and grandmas alike, in a fashion not unlike Clay Aiken in season two, but without his smarminess. Those were the qualities that not only sustained Stevens throughout the show, but landed him a major-label contract, which is something a lot of his fellow contestants did not get. Instead of cranking out an album right away, Stevens and Maverick took their time, working on the record for about a year and finally releasing Red (well, what else was it going to be called?) in the summer of 2005. That time was spent not rethinking Stevens' sound, but helping him grow into his sound. Clearly, he's had some vocal lessons since American Idol, since he sounds relatively assured -- not only does his voice not quaver, but he varies his phrasing, giving momentum to the songs. Of course, his phrasing is borrowed wholesale from Sinatra, Martin, Darin, and Connick, something that's all the more evident because he's performing all-too-familiar standards associated with those singers. The difference between Red and what Stevens did on television is that his homage is better and more effective on record, since he's grown as a vocalist and the record is crisply, professionally produced. It's such a sharp production that the record makes Stevens seem like a more effective vocalist than he actually is, and that will no doubt satisfy both his young and old fans, who, depending on their age, will either enjoy hearing these songs for the first time or will be delighted to hear a young singer carry the torch. But for anybody who doesn't fall into those two categories, Red is a dull ride because of the predictability of the material and Stevens' performance. And the thing is, it didn't need to be that way. The two times that the record breaks from the well-worn book of American standards, the album is much more engaging. First, there's a gentle acoustic-based cover of the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" that's quite sweet and affecting, but what's really fun is a lazily swinging revamping of Maroon 5's "This Love," which is more imaginative and infectious than the rest of the album combined. If Stevens and his producers had followed this path and revamped new (or relatively new) pop songs, his debut would have sounded fresh and distinctive, and helped separate him from his influences. But taking such a path would have been a risk, and it might have alienated the fans he had on the show. So, they decided on the path of least resistance, winding up with an album that will certainly please his fans and certainly make no impression on anybody else. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released October 7, 2014 | PAO Records

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Pop - Released June 21, 2019 | Rainbow Cloud Records

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Pop - Released April 30, 2021 | Cavendish Records Ltd

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Pop - Released November 4, 2003 | Rhino

One of the lesser-known stops in the illustrious career of Judy Garland is likewise one of her most beloved by enthusiasts of all ages. Gay Purr-Ee was a 1962 full-length animated feature highlighted by voice-overs and vocals from Garland and Robert Goulet -- as Mewsette and Jaune-Tom, a pair of Parisian felines -- along with the inimitable Paul Frees (as Meowrice), whose unmistakable pipes have brought to life classic cartoon characters such as John Lennon in Yellow Submarine, Boris Badenov in The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle, and everybody's favorite octopus, Squiddly Diddly, among countless others. Interestingly, it was not Disney Studios that created Gay Purr-Ee, but rather Warner Bros.' Chuck Jones and United Productions of America, a company founded in the midst of the infamous 1941 strike that put Disney at odds with their own animators. As inferred above, not only did the primary cast act out Jones' screenplay, but they sang a host of memorable compositions by none other than Harold Arlen and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg, the duo responsible for the score to The Wizard of Oz some two decades earlier in 1939. This expanded edition boasts an absolutely stunning remaster of the soundtrack and, arguably best of all, five never before released demos courtesy of Arlen that were tucked away in the Warner Bros. tape vaults. Although Garland's private demons had become public knowledge, her career was on another ascent. She had just won five Grammys for Judy at Carnegie Hall -- a double-disc package of her April 1961 show at the venerable venue -- and that same year had also been nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Supporting Actress category for her portrayal of Irene Hoffman in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremburg. Garland's confidence is evident throughout, especially on the enchanting ballad "Little Drops of Rain," the happy-go-lucky "Roses Red, Violets Blue," and the achingly poignant "Paris Is a Lonely Town" -- any of which easily stands up against her voluminous cinematic repertoire. As for Goulet, who had just completed an extended stint on Broadway in Camelot, he is superb on the charming "Mewsette," and sports a slightly silly faux French accent on "The Horse Won't Talk." Indeed, both the film and subsequent soundtrack are full of fun for the entire family. For collectors, the bonus demos from Arlen should all but seal the deal. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 16, 1957 | Masterworks Broadway

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Jazz - Released August 9, 2021 | Vintage Recordings

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Jazz - Released July 18, 2013 | Jazz Classics