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Classical - Released February 1, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Solo Piano - Released November 3, 2015 | Alpha

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Classical - Released September 14, 2018 | ARTALINNA

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In September 2017, during the Brussels Chopin Days, the annual concert season entirely dedicated to the music of the Polish composer, Vestard Shimkus gave a recital that unveiled his irrefutable and oh so personal sense of construction, combined with a narrative power as rare as it is spellbinding, thus confirming his place at the apex among the most striking pianists of the new generation. © Artalinna
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Solo Piano - Released September 20, 2019 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Solo Piano - Released September 27, 2019 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Bruno Rigutto performed a new recording, matured over time, of Chopin's Nocturnes, 40 years after his first complete recording of these pieces. His long-time attendance and his poetic approach to this corpus make this new album an exciting object. This second complete recording is enriched with the sheen that only time and long-lasting imagination can give to the performance. For the French pianist, playing Chopin's music has a mysterious aura. The performer's sensitivity has to resonate with the composer's affects. The alchemy is complete, the interpreter drawing from within himself the atmospheres to create subtle nuances and phrasings. Finally, the album is the mirror of the inner life of Chopin since it follows the chronological order of composition of the Nocturnes. So this is the soundtrack to Chopin’s life that we are following as we listen. The listener discovers or rediscovers Bruno Rigutto under the nocturnal rays of romanticism, which are infused with the works of one of the most endearing composers and pianists. © Aparté
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Classical - Released September 14, 2012 | Sony Classical

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Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili is a phenomenon, and kudos to Sony Classical for snagging her! This is Chopin of the old school, with massive interposition of the performer between music and listener. And it's glorious. The Piano Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 35, is an absolutely original reading, with that black belt of classical pianism, a fresh rendition of the famous funeral march, with real involvement in the emotional content of the movement. This is a Chopin funeral march played after someone actually died, and the moment of chilly nihilism that serves as the finale is really a bit scary here. The big Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52, is hardly less stirring. Buniatishvili races forward at times, delays as if in torture at other times, and has the skills and the raw power to pull it all off. Are there problems? Sure. It's true that a 19th-century virtuoso recital would have freely mixed orchestral and solo music, but the live performance of the Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21, doesn't quite fit here, partly because the acoustic of the Salle Pleyel in Paris is nothing like that of the Jesus-Christus-Kirche in Berlin, where the other pieces were recorded. And a few of Buniatishvili's dynamic contrasts go beyond anything Chopin could have accomplished with his own piano or even intended. But these are the flaws that serve only to point up the considerable accomplishments elsewhere. This is the kind of Chopin playing that people used to line up to hear. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 15, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 4F de Télérama - RTL d'Or - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released November 30, 2018 | BnF Collection

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Solo Piano - Released September 7, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The four ballades of Chopin, more than the somewhat inaccurately named piano sonatas, are the composer's most complex works, both structurally and emotionally, and performances of them differ in substantial ways. They may emphasize sheer virtuosity, leading with Motorik rhythms in the big tunes toward blazing passages like the coda of the Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52. The Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes takes a different direction. He says that he has avoided playing the Ballades until he felt ready, and indeed his work here differs from his rather cool, clean way with Chopin in the past. "This is very personal music," he told Joshua Barone. "It’s not so often that you hear such a confessional quality: Give space for that when you listen to it." It's good advice: Andsnes' Ballades are ongoing monologues, with meter deemphasized and the virtuoso passages coming as explosions of passion that, as often as not, don't lead anywhere. This is arch-Romantic pianism of the best kind, even if it's rather low-key, and it's enhanced by the structure of the program: nocturnes serve as entr'actes between the four ballades. Sample one of these (perhaps the Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. 1) to hear Andsnes' ability to put you in a state of suspended linear time here. Sony's sound from the studios of Radio Bremen is beautifully suited to Andsnes' reflective, intimate aims. The omission of the Ballade No. 4 from the booklet track list in the CD copy is a notable editorial flaw, but this is highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Channel Classics Records

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Anna Fedorova embraces the Russian and, more generally, romantic repertoires. Her performances with the Nodwestdeutsche Philharmonic Orchestra - given to the Great Hall of the royal Concertgebouw and watchable on her YouTube channel - prove it. The concertos by Tchaïkovski and Rachmaninoff, among others, show a passionate and talented musician of irrefutable technique. On the record, Anna Fedorova adopts the role of a storyteller, the name of her record, her second for the label Channel Classics Records. Her previous record, Four Fantaisies, had already embraced the power of the romantic imagination. Placed under the tutelage of Chopin, Liszt and Scriabin, the Ukrainian pianist acts like a poet making music out of stories. The ballads and sonnets are of epic charm and are sometimes danceable; they are often contemplative and are always filled with a strong poetic nature. The “pages” that Anna Fedorova has lifted from these three composers are episodes of great accomplishment where the piano acts as their herald. While the epic aspect of these works is particularly prevalent, the pianist by no means ignores the more poetic dimensions. For the Sonate No.4, Op.30 by Scriabin, she delivers a version that is both thrilling and fanatic. In less than 9 minutes of music, an entire new world is created (Andante) that unravels into a formidable storm (Prestissimo volando). Anna Fedorova owns this complex score: the melodies break out in surges of great clarity that listeners can delightedly move with. From Chopin to Scriabin, we are observers of a language that continually verges more and more on abstraction and harmonic invention all while witnessing the story of a musician’s development. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | Mirare

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Chopin was an absolute master of “small forms” (preludes, ballads, nocturnes, mazurkas, impromptus, études, polonaises), which often overshadowed his larger works such as the three piano sonatas and the sonata for cello and piano which are brilliant but are often criticised for being disparate pieces strung together. Yet, upon closer examination, many musicologists have found that these works are carefully structured and as accomplished as the classical models established by Haydn and Beethoven.In this recital for Mirare, the Russian-Lithuanian pianist Lukas Geniušas has once again set his sights on Chopin after his interpretation of Chopin’s twenty-four Etudes (for Dux Records) in 2013 was highly praised. Two years later, the release of his monographic album dedicated to the Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor and the Concerto in E minor by the Chopin Institute in Warsaw (Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopin), was once again a success.Having studied at the Moscow Frederic Chopin College of Music Performing, the brilliant young Lukas Geniušas now remains loyal to his favourite composer. He leads up to Sonata No. 3 by playing a mix of eleven Mazurkas, like walking down an impressive avenue of lime trees leading to a stately home. His great technique and remarkable sensitivity allow him to pick up on even the most subtle and delicate details of Chopin’s music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released July 19, 2019 | Hungaroton

Booklet
Right from the opening of Ballade No. 1, it is evident that Gabor Farkas places the emphasis on achieving a balanced, full sound. The radiant left hand, with its clear articulation (wonderfully exemplified in the introduction of Ballade No. 2), supports a magnificent polyphonic discourse. Ballade No. 3 reveals phrasing which is at times expressive yet always superbly controlled. Nothing is left to chance in this opus. It is structured and logical, yet somewhat free and irresistibly sincere. With its introductory measures, which are reminiscent of Schumann’s “Stimme aus der Ferne” (a haunting theme that permeates Gábor Farkas’ entire performance here), the complex Ballade No. 4 makes extensive use of the suspension pedal, allowing this prominent musician to showcase his sensitivity for each slight harmonic change. The four Impromptus that follow the four Ballades on this album (which was recorded in November 2018 in Hungaroton Studios) confirm that the Hungarian pianist has an excellent command of Chopinian phrasing. Let us not forget that Gábor Farkas, born in 1981 and author of several Liszt albums for Warner, Hungaroton and Steinway and Sons, belongs to the crème de la crème of young contemporary pianists. Christened by Tamás Vásásáry as a “poet of the piano”, this new release therefore acts as a perfect opportunity to rediscover this Franz Liszt Prize winner in his best light. What is more, these outstanding Chopin records are rare enough to appeal to both novice and expert alike. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 12, 2020 | TACET Musikproduktion

It would be in vain to seek out power and faultless skill in this 22nd volume presenting the art of pianist Eugenie Koroliov published by the label Tacet. Entirely dedicated to Chopin in what is a highly personal program, this album is presented solely from an angle of modest confession, or, to put it more simply, under the aegis of solitary poeticism and poignant melancholy. The nocturnes, waltzes, études and mazurkas certainly speak for themselves in their diversity but with an art that is majestic, moderated and of profound inner character. Chopin’s numerous Parisian students often share their ideas on how one can interpret his works (read more on the subject in the fascinating works of Jean-Jacques Eigeldinger). They often highlight how each musical phrase sounds under their fingers and the brightness that each note delivers, like a syllable, a word, a phrase, a thought. One can never fail to admire such a sensitive, blissful interpretation. Both simplistic and noble. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released May 5, 2017 | Berlin Classics

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The American pianist Claire Huangci has gained followings in her native country, in Germany, where she was partly trained, and, to judge from the chart performance of this Chopin release there, in the United Kingdom. The Russian pianist Vladimir Krainev has said that she has the fastest fingers in the world, which is nothing to sneeze at. The album proclaims that it's the first recording of Chopin's complete nocturnes since Arthur Rubinstein's, which it may well be, but that's not necessarily a good thing: the nocturnes were not a cycle of works, and a lot of them are strongly similar to one another. This doesn't work to Huangci's advantage: her sunny, rather delicate tone is pretty consistent throughout, and 22 nocturnes is a lot. Huangci seems to recognize this when she overlays the album with a "diary" concept, actually a group of quotations from French poetry, each matched to one of the nocturnes. (The booklet isn't particularly illuminating on how the choices were made or what their meaning for Huangci might be.) The strengths of the album are exactly as Krainev says: Huangci's ornaments glitter and glide, and her playing certainly gives an idea of why there has been a fuss over this young player at a time when the American piano scene could use the boost. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 1, 1999 | Warner Classics

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Keyboard Concertos - Released April 12, 2019 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Chopin’s Piano Concertos are works of a twenty-year old composer and ambitious soloist. Powerful and challenging, their romantic dimension also carries sensitive effusions. This duality is highlighted here by an interpretation on period instruments in a chamber version. Choices that are as many clues to recognize the musicians from the Cambini-Paris Quartet and their accomplices: Pianist David Lively and Double bassist Thomas de Pierrefeu. Direct heir to Chopin’s piano teaching legacy, David Lively chose a vintage Érard piano to record both Concertos. Accompanied by a string quintet, he revives the tradition of the genre: before being performed in big concert halls, composers and pianists like Chopin played their latest scores in music lovers’ salons. The broad ambitus covered by the strings and the richness of the sound of the pianoforte respect the symphonic dimension of those two pieces. A musical quest for fidelity and authenticity to music and musicians, and a gift for the listeners! © Aparté
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Classical - Released July 31, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Very lovely yet quite insipid, French pianist Alexendre Tharaud is a good not great pianist performing great not good repertoire: Chopin's Waltzes, the most ephemeral and evanescent of the composer's miniatures. Although relatively infrequently recorded in the later years of the 20th and the early years of the 21st century, Tharaud's 2006 recording of the Waltzes for Harmonia Mundi closely followed Stephen Kovacevich's 2005 recording for EMI. Unfortunately for Tharaud, comparison is inevitable and unfavorable. Not that Tharaud is a poor player. He has the technique, the tone, the sensitivity and the style to pull off the Waltzes. His phrasing is effective, his rhythm is lilting, his tempos are tasteful and his touch is velvet. But Tharaud is also sometimes a tad too wan, a bit too fey, a little too cloying and a shade to brown. Chopin's Waltzes are less sentimental and more robust, less withdrawn and more poetic than he interprets them. They are, in fact, far more as Kovacevich interprets them with a more refined technique and a profounder understanding. Too many times Tharaud seems above and outside the music while Kovacevich seems deep into it, balancing passion with reserve, joy with sorrow, heart with soul and brilliance with melancholy. For the greatest recording of the Waltzes ever made, try Dinu Lipatti's superlatively musical, supremely spiritual recording. For a recent digital recording, try the Kovacevich. Tharaud, for all his virtues, is not in their league. Harmonia Mundi's sound is close and detailed but still evocative. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 26, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Solo Piano - Released August 31, 2018 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica