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Classical - Released September 1, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
According to the notes, Ernst Wilhelm Wolf, the Kapellmeister at the Court of Weimar for 19 years, was the composer of dozens of harpsichord sonatas and concertos, about 35 symphonies, of which at least 26 have survived. Surely, then, there must be more recorded evidence of the musical life of Wolf than four discs of concertos, two of which are out of print, and this newly released disc of four symphonies with Nicolás Pasquet leading the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra of Weimar. No, this is it. Fifty-seven years hitched to the plow of music then as good as forgotten shortly after his death in 1792, the year after Mozart. Does he deserve it? Probably not: by the evidence of this disc, Wolf could turn a good tune, shape a fair form, cut a dashing figure on the dance floor, and was a dab hand with the woodwinds. Pasquet leads stylishly sympathetic interpretations and the orchestra plays Wolf with just the right combination of enthusiasm, restraint, and virtuosity, which are the mark of a true ensemble. Will Wolf ever beat out Mozart or Haydn in the great composers of the late eighteenth century sweepstakes? No, and he won't beat out Kraus or Rosetti or Dittersdorf, either. But, every once and a while -- or maybe only once -- Wolf deserves to be heard. Naxos' sound is nicely clean and pleasantly balanced. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 7, 2015 | CPO

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 15, 2018 | CPO

Booklet
It's Wolf: but it's not Hugo. This is Ernst Wilhelm Wolf (1735-1792), a contemporary of Haydn, and a friend, mentor and colleague to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and this is the first ever recording of his Passion Oratorio Jesu, deine Passion will ich jetzt bedenken from 1756. "Passion Oratorio" and not the Passion according to this or that Evangelist, because Wolf has produced a text which doesn't follow any one Gospel in particular, but is instead made up of commentaries, reflections and quasi-philosophical digressions about the Passion and death of Christ. There are few recitatives, few chorales (and those are deliberately simple, probably because they were meant to be sung by the congregation), a lot of arias, duets and very complex choirs which are very rich in images, because in the middle of this musical period known as "Empfindsamkeit" ("Sensitive"), Wolf is making use of an impressive instrumental, vocal, thematic and harmonic palette. This isn't pure baroque language, and neither classicism nor Sturm und Drang are yet underway. This is a fascinating work, and a fundamental rediscovery which represents a kind of missing link between all these periods, with as many borrowings from religious music as from opera. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 7, 2015 | Bach Festival Singers, Rollins College Singers, Bach Festival Or