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Symphonies - Released July 6, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Grammy Awards
Clocking in at over an hour for the Fourth, and almost an hour for the Eleventh or "1911", these are the two longest and fullest of Shostakovich's symphonies. What's remarkable is that the Fourth, finished in 1936, was only performed in 1961 – eleven years after the performance of the Eleventh in 1957! It was in 1936 that the poor composer felt a bullet whistle by him, following an infamous article in Pravda, dictated by Stalin: "Chaos in Place of Music", which torpedoed the opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk: the work was carefully locked away, only to be brought back out once the dictator was dead, buried and comprehensively decomposed. You can see where the composer was coming from! The tone of this Fourth hasn't the slightest hint of optimism, We hear dark Mahlerian accents, desperate flights and tortured harmonies: not exactly the music of a bright tomorrow. The Eleventh, structured according to a "political" programme, celebrating the revolutionaries of 1905 and the tragic events of Bloody Sunday – when the Russian army fired on a crowd, killing 96 according to official sources and several thousand according to others – with a much more optimistic tone, although we know what optimism means in the world of Shostakovich. The two symphonies were recorded at public concerts, in autumn 2017 and spring 2018 respectively by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and their conductor Andris Nelsons. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released April 13, 2018 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Although Shostakovich's Third Quartet and his Piano Quintet have long been a part of the Belcea Quartet’s and Piotr Anderszewski’s repertoires, they had never recorded any of the composer's material. There is an interesting analogy between this point in the careers of the quartet and the pianist on the one hand and the composer's own life on the other: it was at the age of 32 that, although he was already onto his fifth symphony, Shostakovich wrote his first string quartet. For a long time his demanding attitude towards himself held him back from attempting what he saw as "one of the most difficult of all the musical genres". The impetus came – against the composer's will – from the dastardly Stalin, who had sparked the greatest crisis in Shostakovich's career: in 1936 the dictator had attended a performance of Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, which later got an ominous review in Pravda, which growled about "chaos replacing music" and denounced "hysterical, degenerate music". The young composer ran the risk of arrest and execution: and so it should come as no surprise that after that experience he turned to the more private genre of the string quartet. Every listener can make their own between-the-lines reading of political protests or humanist messages in the work: at any rate it is very hard to see "just" pure music here, for all its fluency. That applies just as much to the Third Quartet of 1946, in which passages recalling Haydn rub shoulders with rather more violent material. The Quintet for Piano and Strings dates back to 1940, and it received the Stalin Prize – which was symptomatic of the unpredictable relations between Shostakovich and the regime, which saw him at once as traitor to the people and a model artist. The composer claimed that he added the piano part to his quintet so as to be able to play it himself, and to take advantage of whatever travel opportunities might come his way as a result...© SM/Qobuz
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Symphonies - Released May 27, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Solo Piano - Released April 7, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
There are various ways to approach Shostakovich's set of 24 Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87, written in 1950 and 1951 during the period after Shostakovich's second denunciation by the Soviet Communist Party's cultural apparatchiks. Russian pianists especially tend to add a lot of tension, implicitly grouping the pieces with the "desk drawer music" that the composer kept mostly hidden (in fact, the Preludes and Fugues were performed a few times, and were indeed criticized for being too "formalist"). Others have taken these deeply Bach-inspired pieces as straight neoclassicism, keeping the tempi and dynamics within strict boundaries. The veteran English pianist Peter Donohoe takes a different tack, meditative and a bit reverent. It's as though he understands the music as Shostakovich's testament to the value of the great Western tradition even as it was under attack and distortion in his home country. Time and time again you hear, in this reading, passages that sound like pure Shostakovich bumping up against the numerous Bach homages, and being made to sound right at home there. Sample the "Prelude and Fugue in F minor," neither deeply melancholy nor neutral, and quite moving in Donohoe's hands. The massive D minor prelude and fugue at the end has plenty of power, but is kept within the sober confines of Donohoe's overall interpretation. The intimate atmosphere created by Signum's engineers is another draw, and overall this is a worthwhile entry in the crowded field of recordings of these works.
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Classical - Released October 19, 2009 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released May 4, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

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Classical - Released November 6, 2015 | Evidence

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Classical - Released February 6, 2012 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Exceptional sound - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released August 21, 2015 | Alpha

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Anna Vinnitskaya has now joined Alpha Classics. Her first recording for the label is devoted to one of her repertories of choice: the concertos of Shostakovich.‘When I performed the Second Piano Concerto for the first time at the age of eleven, his music seemed very optimistic to me. Only later did I understand everything else that is concealed behind the“façade” of Shostakovich’s music.’ The Russian pianist reveals two facets of the composer’s music on this disc by juxtaposing the First Piano Concerto in C minor op. 35, an ‘insolent’ composition with a kaleidoscope of atmospheres and stylistic registers (Russian Romanticism, American jazz, neoclassicism) that constantly surprise the listener, and the more traditional Concerto in F major, which radiates youthful high spirits. For this recording, Anna Vinnitskaya is surrounded by partners of the front rank: the famous Kremerata Baltica, regarded as one of the most creative ensembles on today’s musical scene, and the prestigious wind players of the Staatskapelle Dresden.
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
In January 1936, Shostakovitch put the final touches to his Fourth Symphony, when the doleful bell sounded which would become famous as Pravda's "Chaos in the Place of Music" article, dictated by the dastardly Stalin, who hadn't enjoyed the opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk. Not fancying a thirty-year holiday in Siberia (or a trip to the mortuary), the composer finished his symphony, in fear of hearing the midnight knock at the door from the terrible NKVD, the forerunners of the KGB. He started rehearsals, but in the end he withdrew the work from the billing on some lame pretext, stuck it in a drawer, and forgot about it... For a quarter of a century, until 1961, when it was finally performed. It is one of the bitterest, darkest, most sinister works by Shostakovitch, who was not short of such pieces, and it is not hard to imagine that for Stalin it might have been the straw that broke the camel's back. Stalin would, quite involuntarily, assist in the creation of the Tenth Symphony, as it was written in the wake of the beast's death, in 1953. To be sure, this work was hardly lighter than the Fourth and the central Scherzo is one of those raging, brutal moments for which Shostakovitch is so well-known; but the third movement, terrifically lyrical, blows away the clouds of the second, with the famous DSCH signature theme, which seems to open a new era. The Russian National Orchestra, founded in 1990 by pianist and conductor Mikhail Pletnev – winner of the first prize in the 1978 Tchaikovsky Competition, and who conducts this recording – is very much at work in their element here. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 30, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 23, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonic Music - Released March 25, 2010 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released March 23, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Symphonies - Released July 31, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award
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Classical - Released March 2, 2018 | LPO

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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason

Composer

Dimitri Chostakovitch in the magazine