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Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Enrico Onofri discovered Bartók’s pedagogical piece 44 Duets for two cellos while he was studying in Italy under Hungarian master violinist Sándor Végh. Onofri took his time to prepare his project and looked for the ideal partner. When he met Lina Tur Bonet, then, he knew he had found her. Both violinists come from a baroque background and they both love Bartók.   Bartók composed the piece in 1931 following the suggestion of a German professor who needed a cycle for two violins without accompaniment. The initial agreement called for the rearrangement of his “For Children” played on the piano. But Bartók’s inspiration led him to a more ambitious project. With his friend Zoltán Kodály at his side, he traveled to remote regions of Eastern Europe, where he collected music and popular songs.  Bartók created a network of modes that gives students the opportunity to have fun learning while focusing on progressive and irregular rhythmic parts, double strings, syncopation and percussive effects. The piece is a catalogue of changing atmospheres that seduces musicians far beyond their initial pedagogical aspect. Enrico Onofri and Lina Tur Bonet thought of the duos as a unique 45-minute cycle and exploration of Bartók’s world. They use highly reverberant acoustics and show their “historically informed” abilities to play precise articulations as well as each note’s dynamics. On this recording, they used strings from the early 1900’s mixing bare gut (A and B), metal-wound gut (G), and steel (E), a mixture which creates a pure and precise sound. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 19, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Quartets - Released April 12, 2019 | Channel Classics Records

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Chamber Music - Released April 26, 2019 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | iStrings

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Classical - Released May 14, 2019 | RMG Classical Records

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Violin Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonic Music - Released February 21, 2014 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 21, 2008 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

To Bartók, the piano was a modernist percussion instrument of hammers and wires and pedals, an instrument that couldn't be less suited for the long legato lines and smooth, sculpted sound of nineteenth century piano music, but that also couldn't be more suited for the sharp-cornered, hard-edged sound of twentieth century piano music, particularly Bartók's own piano music. And while earlier pianists have tried to capture Bartók's particularly percussive style of piano writing, nearly all of them were brought up in the nineteenth century and thus, intentionally or not, rounded off Bartók's corners and blunted his edges. Not Zoltán Kocsis; as a Hungarian pianist, Kocsis was born playing Bartók's melodies, harmonies, and rhythms, and as a twentieth century pianist, Kocsis is utterly at home in Bartók's sharp, hard, and edgy world. In this complete set of all Bartók's music for solo piano, Kocsis turns in what may be the finest set of the music in recorded history. Everything from the easiest Microkosmos through the insanely demanding Allegro barbaro is brilliantly performed, thoroughly convincing, and absolutely enjoyable, and nothing sounds long, smooth, or round. While certainly not intended to be listened to all in one sitting, Kocsis' Bartók set is the one to have if you're having only one. Philips' piano sound is, as always, crisp, vivid, and just about real.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 28, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Violin Concertos - Released April 13, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Exceptional sound - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
Today, Finland is one of the richest musical countries on Earth. Thanks to the exceptional quality of its musical teaching it produces numerous composers, conductors and artists who perform all over the world. The very rich catalogue of the dynamic Finnish publisher Ondine contains several recordings of the German violinist Christian Tetzlaff (Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin) by Bach, Mozart's sonatas, Trios by Brahms, concertos by Mendelssohn, Schumann and Shostakovich); and the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu (Sibelius, Mahler, Enescu, Berio, Messiaen, Lindberg, Melartin), but it is their first record together. Bartók's two Violin Concertos were written thirty years apart, for two virtuosos. While the Second Concerto in the form of variations on a theme that develop ingeniously across three movements, has been well-known for a long time, the first remained unheard for years. Written as a declaration of love for the Hungarian-Swiss violinist Stefi Geyer, for whom Bartók had fallen, it was a secret kept by the dedicatee: it was only long after the composer's death that the violinist let Bartók's patron and close friend, the conductor Paul Sacher, know about the work. He would see that it was performed, with Hansheinz Schneeberger, but only in 1958. Bartók's two concertos, essential parts of the repertoire for violin and orchestra would enjoy a well-deserved resurgence in interest among a younger generation of violinists – the recording of the same works by Renaud Capuçon for Warner came out a few weeks ago. This new version, magnificently recorded, carefully explores all the orchestral richness, in perfect dialogue with Christian Tetzlaff's outstanding violin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released June 22, 2010 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year
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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)