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Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released April 19, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Quartets - Released April 12, 2019 | Channel Classics Records

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Violin Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonic Music - Released February 21, 2014 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released June 22, 2010 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Award
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released December 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Distinctions Exceptional sound
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Violin Concertos - Released April 13, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Exceptional sound - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
Today, Finland is one of the richest musical countries on Earth. Thanks to the exceptional quality of its musical teaching it produces numerous composers, conductors and artists who perform all over the world. The very rich catalogue of the dynamic Finnish publisher Ondine contains several recordings of the German violinist Christian Tetzlaff (Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin) by Bach, Mozart's sonatas, Trios by Brahms, concertos by Mendelssohn, Schumann and Shostakovich); and the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu (Sibelius, Mahler, Enescu, Berio, Messiaen, Lindberg, Melartin), but it is their first record together. Bartók's two Violin Concertos were written thirty years apart, for two virtuosos. While the Second Concerto in the form of variations on a theme that develop ingeniously across three movements, has been well-known for a long time, the first remained unheard for years. Written as a declaration of love for the Hungarian-Swiss violinist Stefi Geyer, for whom Bartók had fallen, it was a secret kept by the dedicatee: it was only long after the composer's death that the violinist let Bartók's patron and close friend, the conductor Paul Sacher, know about the work. He would see that it was performed, with Hansheinz Schneeberger, but only in 1958. Bartók's two concertos, essential parts of the repertoire for violin and orchestra would enjoy a well-deserved resurgence in interest among a younger generation of violinists – the recording of the same works by Renaud Capuçon for Warner came out a few weeks ago. This new version, magnificently recorded, carefully explores all the orchestral richness, in perfect dialogue with Christian Tetzlaff's outstanding violin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 1, 2006 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 26, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
Bartók’s last two orchestral masterpieces, written in exile in the United States, are presented here; two “concertos”, one for solo piano, the other for full orchestra, hence its distinctive name of Concerto for Orchestra. Granted Bartók isn’t the first to have used such a title: it can be found as soon as 1925 with Hindemith, in 1931 with Malipiero, in 37 with Casella, and two years later with Kodály. Composed in one go during an unexpected remission from leukaemia, from August to October 1943, Concerto for Orchestra is the Hungarian’s only orchestral work of such scale. Fascinating in its musical hedonism and virtuosity required from each musician, this work serves as a summary for Bartók’s career. It explores the composer’s favourite writing styles as well as the folklores that have inspired him, from Central Europe to Arabic music. It also reveals the richness of Bartókian harmonics, ranging from the diatonic and modal clarity of popular music to a bitter yet always lyric chromaticism. As for Piano Concerto No. 3, it was almost completed before the composer’s death: only the orchestration of the last seventeen measures was missing. It is the only piano piece Bartók didn’t compose on his own initiative, but for his wife Ditta Pásztory – who never had the heart to play it… With Javier Perianes on the piano, conductor Pablo Heras-Casado gives life to this concerto for orchestra with ardour and clarity, thus restoring all of its modernity. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Concertos - Released August 26, 2013 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

To Bartók, the piano was a modernist percussion instrument of hammers and wires and pedals, an instrument that couldn't be less suited for the long legato lines and smooth, sculpted sound of nineteenth century piano music, but that also couldn't be more suited for the sharp-cornered, hard-edged sound of twentieth century piano music, particularly Bartók's own piano music. And while earlier pianists have tried to capture Bartók's particularly percussive style of piano writing, nearly all of them were brought up in the nineteenth century and thus, intentionally or not, rounded off Bartók's corners and blunted his edges. Not Zoltán Kocsis; as a Hungarian pianist, Kocsis was born playing Bartók's melodies, harmonies, and rhythms, and as a twentieth century pianist, Kocsis is utterly at home in Bartók's sharp, hard, and edgy world. In this complete set of all Bartók's music for solo piano, Kocsis turns in what may be the finest set of the music in recorded history. Everything from the easiest Microkosmos through the insanely demanding Allegro barbaro is brilliantly performed, thoroughly convincing, and absolutely enjoyable, and nothing sounds long, smooth, or round. While certainly not intended to be listened to all in one sitting, Kocsis' Bartók set is the one to have if you're having only one. Philips' piano sound is, as always, crisp, vivid, and just about real.
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Classical - Released January 21, 2008 | Warner Classics