Albums

4115 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Classical - Released June 15, 2010 | Aeolus

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Symphonies - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Special Soundchecks - Hi-Res Audio
Given that the aim of this recording, announced in the booklet notes, is to "[demonstrate] how composers in Germany, Italy, Austria, and England responded to the challenges of writing for the violin senza basso, it's a bit odd to begin the proceedings with a work that's not for violin at all. However, the transcription for solo violin of Bach's underplayed Partita for flute in A minor, BWV 1013, by violinist Rachel Podger herself, is quite idiomatic to the violin, and Podger's performance is lively and attractive. From Bach, Podger looks outward to other solo violin works rather than back to the tradition immediately preceding Bach's unaccompanied sonatas and partitas. The works don't have anything directly to do with one another, but they are united in part by being Podger's favorites, and there are some fascinating offbeat pieces that do indeed seem to have counterparts in Bach's magisterial compendia. Consider the very nice pair of solo sonatas by Giuseppe Tartini. In the Giga movement of the first one, the violin takes its solo and is answered by itself in the role not only of harmonic accompaniment but of orchestral figure. The pieces by Nicola Matteis, who inaugurated the entire migration of Italian musicians to Britain, have a fantastic spirit, while the sonata by Pisendel, which may have preceded or followed Bach's pieces, is at least similar to them in language, although less deep. A selection from Biber's Rosary Sonatas works well as a finale. One minor flaw is that notes describe a sonata by Antonio Montanari that is not actually included; a more serious problem is overresonant church sound inconsistent with the chamber purposes of the music.
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Violin Concertos - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Special Soundchecks - Hi-Res Audio
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Violin Concertos - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
£7.99£11.99
£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
You know you're in audiophile territory when an album's credits list the provider of audio cable, and even the specific model involved. Heard on an ordinary CD player, the level of detail captured in this recording is startling (but never overbearing). And one can only guess at the sonic riches available to anyone with a Super Audio CD player. This is the third volume in a series of Mozart's sonatas for keyboard and violin by the fortuitously named British fortepianist Gary Cooper and Baroque violinist Rachel Podger. They make a fine pair. Podger, mostly known for performances of Baroque works, has a flashier, edgier sound than Cooper, with lots of quick little crescendos played off against Cooper's more suave phrasing. They come together in moments of intense expressivity, such as the passages of neo-Romantic harmonies in the Sonata in B flat major, K. 454, and then Cooper draws back and Podger resumes making her sharp comments. The CD is framed by two major sonatas, K. 454 and the Sonata in E flat major, K. 380 -- works in which Mozart virtually created the modern violin and piano sonata by equalizing the balance between violin and piano. In between are two short works of Mozart's extreme youth and two obscure two-movement works written perhaps in the early 1780s. There are a few possible complaints here. Although Paris was one of the first cities conquered by the new fortepiano, the works from Mozart's childhood seem to call for a harpsichord and for a lighter touch in general than they are given here. And the editorial presentation is sloppy. The word "français" is given as "françois"; a strange-looking small capital B is used for the musical flat symbol; there are grammatical errors in the English translation from the Dutch liner notes. Worse, there is no discussion at all in the notes of the two-movement works (tracks 7-10) at the center of the program. They are small pieces of questionable origin and authenticity, and in a complete-recordings set they needed some kind of justification or at least information. The two major sonatas of Mozart's maturity presented here, however, are given exciting performances that make the listener appreciate their breakthrough status within Mozart's output.
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Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Best known for performing music by modern Hungarian composers such as Bartók and Kódaly, and also for his numerous Mozart recordings in the 1990s, Iván Fischer takes a surprising turn in his repertoire by recording Mahler's Symphony No. 6 in A minor, "Tragic," with the Budapest Festival Orchestra, a bold undertaking for any maestro, but one for which he is well-prepared. Fischer has performed Mahler live on many occasions, and has devoted considerable time to studying the music before committing an interpretation to disc, so his 2005 Channel Classics release cannot be called careless or hastily planned. This symphony may not be as difficult to interpret and perform as are others of Mahler's gargantuan essays, but because expectations are high among devotees, Fischer has a tough job pleasing the cognoscenti. (Curiously, many obsessive Mahlerians have a marked preference for this work, possibly because it is the most coherent and powerful of the purely instrumental symphonies. Fischer's performance can be enjoyed as one of the best sounding to come along in years -- the nuances in the brass and percussion are especially marvelous -- and it can be taken as one of the most reasoned and thoughtful interpretations as well. Fischer aims for clarity and balance, and gets a transparent reading from the BFO that reveals every note. Yet a real feeling for Mahler's exaggerated emotional world seems to be lacking, and when the music should be wildly hysterical, appallingly grotesque, and running headlong toward catastrophe, Fischer's version keeps safely back from the edge of the abyss, dusts itself off, and reminds us that it is, after all, only a symphony, not the end of the world. Alas, the great recordings of the Symphony No. 6 actually do sound like the end of the world, and can almost create physical sensations of heartache and terror. This recording, however well it sounds and despite its many interesting features, has no such power, and is much less gripping than it should have been.
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
In this fourth volume of the Mozart Complete Sonatas for Keyboard and Violin, Baroque violinist Rachel Podger and fortepianist Gary Cooper continue to live up to the exceptional reputation their previous three volumes have earned. Both artists represent the pinnacle of musicianship and technique on their own instruments. Together they perform as if on a single instrument; neither voice is subverted to a mere accompanimental role. The interplay between the two instruments is seamless, and both Cooper and Podger clearly share a singular artistic vision for these works. Podger's sound is crystalline and refined; she plays with an immense amount of power and authority without ever pushing her instrument too far. Even figures as simple as repeated quarter notes are treated with individual character and variation, one note always leading inexorably to the next. Her exceptional treatment of dynamics only adds to her impeccable sense of phrasing and pacing. Cooper's fortepiano playing is equally as elegant and energetic, never sounding underpowered as fortepianos sometimes do. Their musical union is the freshest and most captivating offering these works have seen in recent memory. If you haven't already started collecting this series, now's a good a time as any to start.
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Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio