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The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra|Sibelius: Kullervo, Op. 7

Sibelius: Kullervo, Op. 7

Hannu Lintu, The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra

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Hannu Lintu here takes a stand against Paavo Berglund’s legendary version in Bournemouth, the very first of the discography recorded in 1970. Kullervo is a piece of work generally considered epic, a style not often explored by the Finnish composer, who had returned to Vienna at the beginning of the 1890s where he was able to submerge himself in Bruckner and discover some composers of the new generation. Here, Hannu Lintu dares to offer up a serene interpretation, with moderate contrasts in both the emphasis and the tone. For him, Kullervo stays within the defined category of Austro-hungarian music, even if it remains a singularly unique piece of music, as it does not demonstrate much of the modern and cutting-edge Sibelius which broke out from the 4 Legends of Kalevala and certainly over the course of the 1900s after the Second Symphony. Hannu Lintu privileges the ensemble line with regular post-Bruckner-esque balances, organised around polyphony, all the while underlining the freedom which escapes from the young Sibelius’ woodwind motifs. He also appears to snub typically runic Finnish popular influences, which notably guide the whole Introduction, an Allegro which is perfectly moderato. Kullervo transforms into a vast lyrical poem, meditative but somber (there are essences of the Violin concerto). From this vision are born some incredibly poetic moments, like in the third episode (Kullervo and his sister) as the choir sing their last lines just before the soprano (Johanna Rusanen, what a husky tone!) and the baritone (Ville Rusanen) begin their respective narratives, themselves just as astonishing in their dramatic power. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz

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Sibelius: Kullervo, Op. 7

The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra

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Kullervo, Op. 7 (Jean Sibelius)

1
I. Introduction
The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
00:12:39

Jean Sibelius, Composer - The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Hannu Lintu, Conductor

(C) 2019 Ondine (P) 2019 Ondine

2
II. Kullervo's Youth
The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
00:15:18

Jean Sibelius, Composer - The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Hannu Lintu, Conductor

(C) 2019 Ondine (P) 2019 Ondine

3
III. Kullervo and His Sister
Johanna Rusanen
00:23:01

Jean Sibelius, Composer - The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Estonian National Male Choir, Choir - Hannu Lintu, Conductor - Ville Rusanen, Artist - Johanna Rusanen, Artist, MainArtist - Polytech Male Choir, Choir

(C) 2019 Ondine (P) 2019 Ondine

4
IV. Kullervo Goes to War
The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
00:09:26

Jean Sibelius, Composer - The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Hannu Lintu, Conductor

(C) 2019 Ondine (P) 2019 Ondine

5
V. Kullervo's Death
Polytech Male Choir
00:12:00

Jean Sibelius, Composer - The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Estonian National Male Choir, Choir - Hannu Lintu, Conductor - Polytech Male Choir, Choir, MainArtist

(C) 2019 Ondine (P) 2019 Ondine

Album Description

Hannu Lintu here takes a stand against Paavo Berglund’s legendary version in Bournemouth, the very first of the discography recorded in 1970. Kullervo is a piece of work generally considered epic, a style not often explored by the Finnish composer, who had returned to Vienna at the beginning of the 1890s where he was able to submerge himself in Bruckner and discover some composers of the new generation. Here, Hannu Lintu dares to offer up a serene interpretation, with moderate contrasts in both the emphasis and the tone. For him, Kullervo stays within the defined category of Austro-hungarian music, even if it remains a singularly unique piece of music, as it does not demonstrate much of the modern and cutting-edge Sibelius which broke out from the 4 Legends of Kalevala and certainly over the course of the 1900s after the Second Symphony. Hannu Lintu privileges the ensemble line with regular post-Bruckner-esque balances, organised around polyphony, all the while underlining the freedom which escapes from the young Sibelius’ woodwind motifs. He also appears to snub typically runic Finnish popular influences, which notably guide the whole Introduction, an Allegro which is perfectly moderato. Kullervo transforms into a vast lyrical poem, meditative but somber (there are essences of the Violin concerto). From this vision are born some incredibly poetic moments, like in the third episode (Kullervo and his sister) as the choir sing their last lines just before the soprano (Johanna Rusanen, what a husky tone!) and the baritone (Ville Rusanen) begin their respective narratives, themselves just as astonishing in their dramatic power. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz

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