Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Fela Kuti|Shakara

Shakara

Fela Kuti

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

The album Shakara was a turning point for Fela Kuti. The year was 1972: he had just experienced his first continental success with Chop ’n’ Quench, changed his band’s name from Nigeria 70 to Africa 70, learned to play the saxophone (in just 24 hours according to legend) and adopted Pidgin, an English Creole, as his writing language to reach a larger audience. He had also just taken over the club of the Empire Hotel, in Lagos, renamed African Shrine, where he was performing legendary concerts on a nightly basis with his band and a myriad of dancers. The ingredients for success and legend were present, and Shakara – that featured the title track and the famous Lady −, proudly marked the beginning of a glorious era for the most scandalous and respected African musician. The two epic tracks both stretch over 13 minutes. Fela, with his Rhodes organ and a playing style reminiscent of the Doors’ Ray Manzarek, injects drama, while Tony Allen sets the rhythm so specific to afrobeat and conducts the musicians. Guitars keep up the pressure, brass mount their attack like warriors, marking the shapes and volutes of this sensual epic. Fela’s imperial song, and the response from female choirs, still provide the most irrepressible chills.


 


Both Lady and Shakara are addressed to women, in an ambiguous way that triggered the wrath of some feminists. In Lady, Fela makes the distinction between a simple African woman – docile, obedient and obliging to her husband −, and the educated lady who, influenced by western morals, wants to be man’s equal. One could sense Fela’s preference for the former, and his fear of the latter, because even though he is well known for having married 27 Nigerians on the same day, he was also madly in love with an English mixed-race woman, Remilekun Taylor, with whom he had his son Femi. In Shakara (braggart), he takes to pieces the schemes of dominant males who threaten women with violence, but whose claptrap is empty. Be that as it may, the musical discourse is foolproof and constitutes the very essence of an always-active historic genre. As good as his successors and descendants may be, afrobeat will never be as clearly penetrating as through the voice of the initiating maestro: Fela Anikulapo Kuti. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz

More info

Shakara

Fela Kuti

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Lady
00:13:48

Fela Kuti, Composer, MainArtist

2013 Kalakuta Sunrise 2009 FAK Ltd under exclusive license to Kalakuta Sunrise / Knitting Factory Records

2
Shakara (Oloje)
00:13:26

Fela Kuti, Composer, MainArtist - Afrika 70, FeaturedArtist

2013 Kalakuta Sunrise 2009 FAK Ltd under exclusive license to Kalakuta Sunrise / Knitting Factory Records

Album Description

The album Shakara was a turning point for Fela Kuti. The year was 1972: he had just experienced his first continental success with Chop ’n’ Quench, changed his band’s name from Nigeria 70 to Africa 70, learned to play the saxophone (in just 24 hours according to legend) and adopted Pidgin, an English Creole, as his writing language to reach a larger audience. He had also just taken over the club of the Empire Hotel, in Lagos, renamed African Shrine, where he was performing legendary concerts on a nightly basis with his band and a myriad of dancers. The ingredients for success and legend were present, and Shakara – that featured the title track and the famous Lady −, proudly marked the beginning of a glorious era for the most scandalous and respected African musician. The two epic tracks both stretch over 13 minutes. Fela, with his Rhodes organ and a playing style reminiscent of the Doors’ Ray Manzarek, injects drama, while Tony Allen sets the rhythm so specific to afrobeat and conducts the musicians. Guitars keep up the pressure, brass mount their attack like warriors, marking the shapes and volutes of this sensual epic. Fela’s imperial song, and the response from female choirs, still provide the most irrepressible chills.


 


Both Lady and Shakara are addressed to women, in an ambiguous way that triggered the wrath of some feminists. In Lady, Fela makes the distinction between a simple African woman – docile, obedient and obliging to her husband −, and the educated lady who, influenced by western morals, wants to be man’s equal. One could sense Fela’s preference for the former, and his fear of the latter, because even though he is well known for having married 27 Nigerians on the same day, he was also madly in love with an English mixed-race woman, Remilekun Taylor, with whom he had his son Femi. In Shakara (braggart), he takes to pieces the schemes of dominant males who threaten women with violence, but whose claptrap is empty. Be that as it may, the musical discourse is foolproof and constitutes the very essence of an always-active historic genre. As good as his successors and descendants may be, afrobeat will never be as clearly penetrating as through the voice of the initiating maestro: Fela Anikulapo Kuti. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

More on Qobuz
By Fela Kuti

Original Sufferhead

Fela Kuti

The Best of the Black President

Fela Kuti

Fela With Ginger Baker Live!

Fela Kuti

Zombie

Fela Kuti

Zombie Fela Kuti

Expensive Shit

Fela Kuti

Expensive Shit Fela Kuti

Playlists

You may also like...

Buena Vista Social Club

Buena Vista Social Club

Buena Vista Social Club Buena Vista Social Club

Overtones. Les saisons harmoniques

Wu Wei & Wang Li

Love Yourself 結 'Answer'

BTS

Buena Vista Social Club

Buena Vista Social Club

Buena Vista Social Club Buena Vista Social Club

Tempo

Dom La Nena

Tempo Dom La Nena
In your panoramas...
Fela, the Pope of Afrobeat

A fusion of West African rhythms, jazz, funk and soul, twenty years on from the disappearance of its shamanic creator, Afrobeat continues to influence hordes of musicians to this day. An inferno of horns and a thick tangle of rhythms: Fela Anikulapo Kuta invented the most thrilling trance of the 70s and 80s.

Bossa nova, the Eternal Wave

Since its creation in the late 1950s, Bossa-nova has become an indispensable part of Brazilian music. The style’s strong evocative power won over artists from all around the world and earned recognition for many first-rate musicians whose works are now seen as classics.

Bob Marley’s Unfinished Trilogy

It was precisely 40 years ago that Bob Marley released his final album, Uprising, the climax to his political trilogy (with Survival and Confrontation) that was left unfinished after Marley was taken by cancer in 1981. Let us look back at this Jamaican prophet’s shift towards militarism during his last three years on Earth.

In the news...