Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

New Order - Music Complete: Remix EP

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Music Complete: Remix EP

New Order

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

For Music Complete, New Order's ninth album and first in a decade, the band signed to new label Mute and welcomed keyboardist Gillian Gilbert back for her first recordings with them since 2001. Unfortunately, original bassist Peter Hook, who quit in 2007, didn't return and his bass duties were taken over by Tom Chapman, who played with Bernard Sumner in Bad Lieutenant. The return of Gilbert is a clue that the band is looking to the past for inspiration here and forsaking the guitar-driven rock orientation of its last couple albums for something more balanced, if not tipped in favor of more electronic and dancefloor-oriented songs. To that end, they brought in Chemical Brother Tom Rowlands as well as Richard X and Stuart Price to produce tracks. Not the most daring or forward-looking choices for collaborators, but their efforts result in some of the album's highlights. Rowlands invests "Singularity" with some Chemical Brothers-style punch, while "Unlearn This Hatred" has a passionate, almost industrial drive. The Richard X-mixed "Plastic" is the most new wave-sounding moment on the record, full of sparkling surfaces and fueled by some retro sequencers. Elsewhere, the bandmembers take it upon themselves to craft songs that have more joyful bounce than one would expect from them. "Tutti Frutti" is a tricky bit of electro-disco with a rubbery electronic bassline, some vintage keyboard wash from Gilbert, and a vocal cameo by La Roux's Elly Jackson. She's also on "People on the High Line," which is probably the funkiest track they've ever recorded, with finger-popping bass, house-y piano, and a beat that pulsates like a hot N.Y.C. summer night. (The other guest appearances on the album are by the Killers' Brandon Flowers, who adds some over the top crooning to "Superheated," and Iggy Pop, who mumbles semi-coherently through the interminable, momentum-sapping "Stray Dog.") The melancholic guitar-driven songs are a little less interesting, with only "Restless" coming close to the feel of the group's classic tracks. Too many of them come off like New Order by the numbers, with seriously banal (even for him) lyrics from Sumner and a string section that only serves to add more weight to the already too-soggy sound. It's hard to say which is most disappointing -- the songs or the sound -- but it's clear that Hook's bass would definitely have made a huge difference. Though Chapman tries his best to conjure up Hook's famous style without sounding like he's making copies, his efforts really can't compare to the melodic grace and sheer power of Hook's playing. New Order without Hook is like Joy Division without Ian Curtis, only instead of New Order forming in the wake, it's Bad Lieutenant. Even making an allowance for Hook's glaring absence, Music Complete is still a watered-down and uninspired album by a band that lost the plot long ago and can now only capture an occasional glimmer of what made it so great in the first place.
© Tim Sendra /TiVo

More info

Music Complete: Remix EP

New Order

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Tutti Frutti Takkyu Ishino Remix
00:07:55

New Order, Composer, Producer, Artist, MainArtist - Craig Silvey, Mixer - Takkyu Ishino, Artist - Published by Universal Music Publishing, MusicPublisher

2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

2
The Game Mark Reeder Spielt Mit Version
00:06:48

New Order, Composer, Producer, Artist, MainArtist - Craig Silvey, Mixer - Mark Reeder, Artist - Published by Universal Music Publishing, MusicPublisher

2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

3
Academic Mark Reeder's Akademix
00:07:23

New Order, Composer, Producer, Artist, MainArtist - Craig Silvey, Mixer - Mark Reeder, Artist - Published by Universal Music Publishing, MusicPublisher

2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

4
People on the High Line Purple Disco Machine Remix
00:07:05

New Order, Composer, Producer, Artist, MainArtist - Craig Silvey, Mixer - Purple Disco Machine, Artist - Published by Universal Music Publishing, MusicPublisher

2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

5
Restless Agoria Dub
00:06:07

New Order, Composer, Producer, Artist, MainArtist - Craig Silvey, Mixer - Agoria, Artist - Published by Universal Music Publishing, MusicPublisher

2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2015 New Order Ltd under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

Album Description

For Music Complete, New Order's ninth album and first in a decade, the band signed to new label Mute and welcomed keyboardist Gillian Gilbert back for her first recordings with them since 2001. Unfortunately, original bassist Peter Hook, who quit in 2007, didn't return and his bass duties were taken over by Tom Chapman, who played with Bernard Sumner in Bad Lieutenant. The return of Gilbert is a clue that the band is looking to the past for inspiration here and forsaking the guitar-driven rock orientation of its last couple albums for something more balanced, if not tipped in favor of more electronic and dancefloor-oriented songs. To that end, they brought in Chemical Brother Tom Rowlands as well as Richard X and Stuart Price to produce tracks. Not the most daring or forward-looking choices for collaborators, but their efforts result in some of the album's highlights. Rowlands invests "Singularity" with some Chemical Brothers-style punch, while "Unlearn This Hatred" has a passionate, almost industrial drive. The Richard X-mixed "Plastic" is the most new wave-sounding moment on the record, full of sparkling surfaces and fueled by some retro sequencers. Elsewhere, the bandmembers take it upon themselves to craft songs that have more joyful bounce than one would expect from them. "Tutti Frutti" is a tricky bit of electro-disco with a rubbery electronic bassline, some vintage keyboard wash from Gilbert, and a vocal cameo by La Roux's Elly Jackson. She's also on "People on the High Line," which is probably the funkiest track they've ever recorded, with finger-popping bass, house-y piano, and a beat that pulsates like a hot N.Y.C. summer night. (The other guest appearances on the album are by the Killers' Brandon Flowers, who adds some over the top crooning to "Superheated," and Iggy Pop, who mumbles semi-coherently through the interminable, momentum-sapping "Stray Dog.") The melancholic guitar-driven songs are a little less interesting, with only "Restless" coming close to the feel of the group's classic tracks. Too many of them come off like New Order by the numbers, with seriously banal (even for him) lyrics from Sumner and a string section that only serves to add more weight to the already too-soggy sound. It's hard to say which is most disappointing -- the songs or the sound -- but it's clear that Hook's bass would definitely have made a huge difference. Though Chapman tries his best to conjure up Hook's famous style without sounding like he's making copies, his efforts really can't compare to the melodic grace and sheer power of Hook's playing. New Order without Hook is like Joy Division without Ian Curtis, only instead of New Order forming in the wake, it's Bad Lieutenant. Even making an allowance for Hook's glaring absence, Music Complete is still a watered-down and uninspired album by a band that lost the plot long ago and can now only capture an occasional glimmer of what made it so great in the first place.
© Tim Sendra /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Everyday Life (Explicit)

Coldplay

"Let's Rock"

The Black Keys

"Let's Rock" The Black Keys

El Camino

The Black Keys

El Camino The Black Keys

Songs In The Key Of Life

Stevie Wonder

Songs In The Key Of Life Stevie Wonder
More on Qobuz
By New Order

Bizarre Love Triangle (Live at Alexandra Palace)

New Order

Blue Monday (2020 Digital Master)

New Order

Be a Rebel

New Order

Be a Rebel New Order

Substance 1987

New Order

Substance 1987 New Order

Singles (2016 Remaster)

New Order

Playlists

You may also like...

When You See Yourself

Kings Of Leon

When You See Yourself Kings Of Leon

Folklore (Explicit)

Taylor Swift

Folklore (Explicit) Taylor Swift

Fetch The Bolt Cutters

Fiona Apple

What Kinda Music

Tom Misch

What Kinda Music Tom Misch

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Billie Eilish

In your panoramas...
New Order: From Darkness to Dance-floor

How does one Mancunian group move from perhaps the gloomiest band of the punk era to a master of the dance-floor? In the early eighties, straight out of Joy Division’s ashes, New Order marked one of the first successful unions of rock’n’roll and dance music. A perfect soundtrack for a morose, Thatcherite England.

Nordic Electronic in 11 Artists

The musicians of Northern Europe have always brought their personal Arctic twist to all genres of music, and the world of electronic music is no exception. Here’s an overview of 11 Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish artists who have taken techno, house, disco and dub towards new horizons.

40 Years of Post-punk in 10 Albums

In the twilight of the ’70s, as the shrapnel of the punk explosion was still settling, the movement was already inspiring new groups. As New Wave unfurled, the post-punk movement represented a tortured, even radical turn. From pioneers Joy Division and The Fall to current bands Shame and Fontaines D.C., here’s a close-up on the landmark albums that electrified the entire music world and continue to fascinate the rock’n’roll underground.

In the news...