Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Lars Vogt|Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos

Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos

Lars Vogt, Orchestre de chambre de Paris

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

For pianists to conduct concertos from the keyboard is not uncommon, but for a conductor to be hired on that basis is more unusual. Thus a certain interest attends this recording by Lars Vogt, with the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris, where he has become permanent conductor. The early indications are very, very good. Vogt sculpts distinctive readings of Mendelssohn's two piano concertos. These works have never been considered to be at the pinnacle of the 19th century concerto repertory, but in Vogt's hands, they make a strong bid for a climb to that point. The Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25, is especially good. Vogt takes it at a quick clip with very high energy in the outer movements, seemingly urging the orchestra along and then racing ahead. He even sacrifices some of the usual calm in the first movement's second subject, leaving real repose to the slow movement. The two slow movements show him fully capable of lyricism; he says he considers them piano-and-orchestra "Songs Without Words" and delivers tuneful readings accordingly. The Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 40, is not quite as striking as the First. This dramatic work fits a bit less well with Vogt's approach, but it's certainly an exciting performance. The final Capriccio brillant, Op. 22, not so often played, also works very well as Vogt sharply differentiates its sections and keeps the whole structure moving. With the Ondine label providing fine sound from the Philharmonie de Paris, this is an unusually good Mendelssohn release.
© TiVo

More info

Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos

Lars Vogt

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 80 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 80 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From £10.83/month

Piano Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 25, MWV O 7 (Felix Mendelssohn)

1
I. Molto allegro con fuoco
00:07:10

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

2
II. Andante
00:05:33

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

3
III. Presto
00:06:15

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

Piano Concerto No. 2 in D Minor, Op. 40, MWV O 11 (Felix Mendelssohn)

4
I. Allegro appassionata
00:09:15

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

Piano Concerto No. 2 in D Minor, Op. 40 MWV O 11 (Felix Mendelssohn)

5
II. Adagio
00:05:32

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

6
III. Finale. Presto scherzando
00:06:38

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

Capriccio brillant in B Minor, Op. 22, MWV O 8 (Felix Mendelssohn)

7
Capriccio brillant in B Minor, Op. 22, MWV O 8
00:10:49

Felix Mendelssohn, Composer - Lars Vogt, Artist, MainArtist - Orchestre de chambre de Paris, Orchestra, MainArtist

(C) 2021 Ondine (P) 2021 Ondine

Album Description

For pianists to conduct concertos from the keyboard is not uncommon, but for a conductor to be hired on that basis is more unusual. Thus a certain interest attends this recording by Lars Vogt, with the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris, where he has become permanent conductor. The early indications are very, very good. Vogt sculpts distinctive readings of Mendelssohn's two piano concertos. These works have never been considered to be at the pinnacle of the 19th century concerto repertory, but in Vogt's hands, they make a strong bid for a climb to that point. The Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25, is especially good. Vogt takes it at a quick clip with very high energy in the outer movements, seemingly urging the orchestra along and then racing ahead. He even sacrifices some of the usual calm in the first movement's second subject, leaving real repose to the slow movement. The two slow movements show him fully capable of lyricism; he says he considers them piano-and-orchestra "Songs Without Words" and delivers tuneful readings accordingly. The Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 40, is not quite as striking as the First. This dramatic work fits a bit less well with Vogt's approach, but it's certainly an exciting performance. The final Capriccio brillant, Op. 22, not so often played, also works very well as Vogt sharply differentiates its sections and keeps the whole structure moving. With the Ondine label providing fine sound from the Philharmonie de Paris, this is an unusually good Mendelssohn release.
© TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

The Number of the Beast

Iron Maiden

Reeling

The Mysterines

Reeling The Mysterines

From The Fires

Greta Van Fleet

From The Fires Greta Van Fleet

Powerslave

Iron Maiden

Powerslave Iron Maiden
More on Qobuz
By Lars Vogt

Bach : Goldberg Variations, BWV 988

Lars Vogt

Beethoven : Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 4

Lars Vogt

Janáček: Piano Works

Lars Vogt

Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2 & Handel Variations

Lars Vogt

Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 15 & 4 Ballades, Op. 10

Lars Vogt

Playlists

You may also like...

The New Four Seasons - Vivaldi Recomposed

Max Richter

BD Music Presents Erik Satie

Various Artists

Exiles

Max Richter

Exiles Max Richter

Old Friends New Friends

Nils Frahm

Nightscapes

Magdalena Hoffmann

Nightscapes Magdalena Hoffmann
In your panoramas...
Undervalued: a Look Back on Female Composers

From Sappho of Mytilene to Kaija Saariaho and Clara Schumann, several women have managed to break through the macho codes of the milieu and become composers. While the classical music landscape has been largely dominated by men in recent centuries, the work of their female colleagues, whether pioneers or contemporaries, is just as fascinating. Here we put eleven undervalued figures of female composition in the spotlight.

Scriabin's Flamboyant Raptures

Somewhat overshadowed today by his compatriots Rimsky-Korsakov, Stravinsky and Rachmaninov, Alexander Scriabin is nonetheless a key figure in Russian music. At the beginning of the 20th century, the composer and virtuoso pianist broke away from the Romantic legacy to offer a unique and innovative musical language which no one would follow. His work, deeply influenced by mystical philosophy and synaesthesia, would undergo a dazzling evolution in barely two decades, interrupted by his premature death at the age of 43.

10 Versions of Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique

As a proper manifesto of French romanticism, Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique marked the 19th century as much as Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring impacted the 20th. Composed in Paris − which at the time was a global crucible for artistic creation − these two masterpieces catapulted musical language into another dimension. On December 5th, 1830 the revolutionary work of 27-year-old Hector Berlioz deeply moved the musicians present in the small room of the old academy of music, among whom were Meyerbeer and Liszt, who were impressed by the extraordinary audacity of this piece presented just three years after Beethoven’s death.

In the news...