Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Can - LIVE IN STUTTGART 1975

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

LIVE IN STUTTGART 1975

Can

  • Released on 28/05/2021 by Mute
  • Main artist: Can
  • Genre: Rock
Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Can's experimentation and willingness to take unprecedented risks touched every aspect of their music. The Krautrock legends' innovative approach to studio albums produced some of the most exciting results of the entire era of rock music they existed in, but the foundation for their studio brilliance was in their otherworldly powers as a live entity. Live in Stuttgart 1975 captures some of this live magic, documenting the entirety of a 90-minute-long, fully improvised concert made up of five lengthy jams. For the most part, the performances are high-energy and intricate and the band sounds almost supernaturally communicative. Instead of taking turns soloing over sleepy blues-based vamps, Can swing between complex modes that they explore restlessly. Sometimes they'll break into what sounds like familiar material -- a rhythm or a riff that starts to sound like something from Tago Mago -- but these hints of structure never fully materialize. Throughout the set, Can is determined to go new places. The band had just recorded their sixth LP, Landed, which at that point combined both their most high-tech production and their most straightforward jam band material. Some of that excessive jam focus comes through on Stuttgart 1975. The cautious intro to "Zwei" (the album's five pieces are titled with German numerals) has the same lazy shuffle and prismatic guitar noodling as the Grateful Dead during their live sets. That mellowness lasts only a moment before taking one of many quick turns to wilder territory. There are some parallels to the ungrounded freeform of electric Miles Davis and Hendrix's raw live recordings, but there's also some integration of early synthesizers and a rhythmic presence that sounds like Can and Can alone. Whether locked into an airtight groove or exploring noisy chaos, the band moves as a singular organism that doesn't let up for a second. Their studio albums solidified Can's reputation as one of the most important and groundbreaking bands of their time, but Stuttgart 1975 exemplifies how that creative spirit translated to the stage, highlighting yet another side of Can's limitless ability.
© Fred Thomas /TiVo

More info

LIVE IN STUTTGART 1975

Can

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Stuttgart 75 Eins
00:20:10

Jaki Liebezeit, Composer - Irmin Schmidt, Composer - Can, MainArtist - Holger Czukay, Composer - Michael Karoli, Composer

2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

2
Stuttgart 75 Zwei
00:14:00

Jaki Liebezeit, Composer - Irmin Schmidt, Composer - Can, MainArtist - Holger Czukay, Composer - Michael Karoli, Composer

2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

3
Stuttgart 75 Drei
00:35:58

Jaki Liebezeit, Composer - Irmin Schmidt, Composer - Can, MainArtist - Holger Czukay, Composer - Michael Karoli, Composer

2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

DISC 2

1
Stuttgart 75 Vier
00:10:23

Jaki Liebezeit, Composer - Irmin Schmidt, Composer - Can, MainArtist - Holger Czukay, Composer - Michael Karoli, Composer

2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

2
Stuttgart 75 Fünf
00:09:31

Jaki Liebezeit, Composer - Irmin Schmidt, Composer - Can, MainArtist - Holger Czukay, Composer - Michael Karoli, Composer

2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd. 2021 Spoon Records under exclusive license to Mute Artists Ltd.

Album Description

Can's experimentation and willingness to take unprecedented risks touched every aspect of their music. The Krautrock legends' innovative approach to studio albums produced some of the most exciting results of the entire era of rock music they existed in, but the foundation for their studio brilliance was in their otherworldly powers as a live entity. Live in Stuttgart 1975 captures some of this live magic, documenting the entirety of a 90-minute-long, fully improvised concert made up of five lengthy jams. For the most part, the performances are high-energy and intricate and the band sounds almost supernaturally communicative. Instead of taking turns soloing over sleepy blues-based vamps, Can swing between complex modes that they explore restlessly. Sometimes they'll break into what sounds like familiar material -- a rhythm or a riff that starts to sound like something from Tago Mago -- but these hints of structure never fully materialize. Throughout the set, Can is determined to go new places. The band had just recorded their sixth LP, Landed, which at that point combined both their most high-tech production and their most straightforward jam band material. Some of that excessive jam focus comes through on Stuttgart 1975. The cautious intro to "Zwei" (the album's five pieces are titled with German numerals) has the same lazy shuffle and prismatic guitar noodling as the Grateful Dead during their live sets. That mellowness lasts only a moment before taking one of many quick turns to wilder territory. There are some parallels to the ungrounded freeform of electric Miles Davis and Hendrix's raw live recordings, but there's also some integration of early synthesizers and a rhythmic presence that sounds like Can and Can alone. Whether locked into an airtight groove or exploring noisy chaos, the band moves as a singular organism that doesn't let up for a second. Their studio albums solidified Can's reputation as one of the most important and groundbreaking bands of their time, but Stuttgart 1975 exemplifies how that creative spirit translated to the stage, highlighting yet another side of Can's limitless ability.
© Fred Thomas /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Aqualung

Jethro Tull

Aqualung Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick

Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick Jethro Tull

Tubular Bells

Mike Oldfield

Tubular Bells Mike Oldfield

Source

Nubya Garcia

Source Nubya Garcia
More on Qobuz
By Can

NEXTLION

Can

NEXTLION Can

Ege Bamyasi

Can

Tago Mago (Remastered)

Can

The Singles

Can

Bir Olmalı

Can

You may also like...

Springtime in New York: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 16 / 1980-1985 (Deluxe Edition)

Bob Dylan

Letter To You

Bruce Springsteen

Letter To You Bruce Springsteen

Power Up

AC/DC

Power Up AC/DC

Rumours

Fleetwood Mac

Rumours Fleetwood Mac

Abbey Road (Super Deluxe Edition)

The Beatles

In your panoramas...
40 Years of Post-punk in 10 Albums

In the twilight of the ’70s, as the shrapnel of the punk explosion was still settling, the movement was already inspiring new groups. As New Wave unfurled, the post-punk movement represented a tortured, even radical turn. From pioneers Joy Division and The Fall to current bands Shame and Fontaines D.C., here’s a close-up on the landmark albums that electrified the entire music world and continue to fascinate the rock’n’roll underground.

The Dark Side of the Moon: An Astronomical Success

Pink Floyd's ground-breaking album The Dark Side of the Moon was the result of a long creative process that began around 1968. A Saucerful of Secrets (the main track from the eponymous album) was, for Nick Mason at least, where it all began. Their next album Ummagumma (1969) gave each band member the opportunity to create a solo piece, though they would have to combine their talents if they wanted to hit the jackpot. Pink Floyd continued to search for the perfect record with Meddle, an album which highlighted their skills in the studio, and Atom Heart Mother, before they reached nirvana with The Dark Side of the Moon. And the album’s perfection hasn’t faded one bit.

The Black Keys in 10 Songs

From 2001, The Black Keys have been reminding the world about the real roots of the Blues, cutting away all the frills and unnecessary solos. Their music has always been untamed, abrupt and minimalist. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney developed this unique style over the course of two decades, without once selling their souls to the devil at a Mississippi crossroads. Here are ten songs to prove it.

In the news...