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Frank Zappa|Joe's Garage Acts I, II & III

Joe's Garage Acts I, II & III

Frank Zappa

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Joe's Garage was originally released in 1979 in two separate parts; Act I came first, followed by a two-record set containing Acts II & III. Joe's Garage is generally regarded as one of Zappa's finest post-'60s conceptual works, a sprawling, satirical rock opera about a totalitarian future in which music is outlawed to control the population. The narrative is long, winding, and occasionally loses focus; it was improvised in a weekend, some of it around previously existing songs, but Zappa manages to make most of it hang together. Acts II & III give off much the same feel, as Zappa relies heavily on what he termed "xenochrony" -- previously recorded guitar solos transferred onto new, rhythmically different backing tracks to produce random musical coincidences. Such an approach is guaranteed to produce some slow moments as well, but critics latched onto the work more for its conceptual substance. Joe's Garage satirizes social control mechanisms, consumerism, corporate abuses, gender politics, religion, and the rock & roll lifestyle; all these forces conspire against the title protagonist, an average young man who simply wants to play guitar and enjoy himself. Even though Zappa himself hated punk rock and even says so on the album, his ideas seemed to support punk's do-it-yourself challenge to the record industry and to social norms in general. Since this is 1979-era Zappa, there are liberal applications of his trademark scatological humor (the titles of "Catholic Girls," "Crew Slut," "Why Does It Hurt When I Pee?," and "Keep It Greasey" are self-explanatory). Still, in spite of its flaws, Joe's Garage has enough substance to make it one of Zappa's most important '70s works and overall political statements, even if it's not focused enough to rank with his earliest Mothers of Invention masterpieces.
© Steve Huey /TiVo

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Joe's Garage Acts I, II & III

Frank Zappa

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1
The Central Scrutinizer
00:03:28

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

2
Joe's Garage
00:06:09

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

3
Catholic Girls
00:04:18

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

4
Crew Slut
00:06:40

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

5
Fembot In A Wet T-Shirt
00:04:44

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

6
On The Bus
00:04:31

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

7
Why Does It Hurt When I Pee?
00:02:22

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

8
Lucille Has Messed My Mind Up
00:05:42

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

9
Scrutinizer Postlude
00:01:35

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

10
A Token Of My Extreme
00:05:28

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

11
Stick It Out
00:04:33

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

12
Sy Borg
00:08:54

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

DISC 2

1
Dong Work For Yuda
00:05:03

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Smothers, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

2
Keep It Greasey
00:08:20

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

3
Outside Now
00:05:51

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

4
He Used To Cut The Grass
00:08:34

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

5
Packard Goose
00:11:34

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

6
Watermelon In Easter Hay
00:09:08

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

7
A Little Green Rosetta
00:08:16

Frank Zappa, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1979 Zappa Family Trust

Album Description

Joe's Garage was originally released in 1979 in two separate parts; Act I came first, followed by a two-record set containing Acts II & III. Joe's Garage is generally regarded as one of Zappa's finest post-'60s conceptual works, a sprawling, satirical rock opera about a totalitarian future in which music is outlawed to control the population. The narrative is long, winding, and occasionally loses focus; it was improvised in a weekend, some of it around previously existing songs, but Zappa manages to make most of it hang together. Acts II & III give off much the same feel, as Zappa relies heavily on what he termed "xenochrony" -- previously recorded guitar solos transferred onto new, rhythmically different backing tracks to produce random musical coincidences. Such an approach is guaranteed to produce some slow moments as well, but critics latched onto the work more for its conceptual substance. Joe's Garage satirizes social control mechanisms, consumerism, corporate abuses, gender politics, religion, and the rock & roll lifestyle; all these forces conspire against the title protagonist, an average young man who simply wants to play guitar and enjoy himself. Even though Zappa himself hated punk rock and even says so on the album, his ideas seemed to support punk's do-it-yourself challenge to the record industry and to social norms in general. Since this is 1979-era Zappa, there are liberal applications of his trademark scatological humor (the titles of "Catholic Girls," "Crew Slut," "Why Does It Hurt When I Pee?," and "Keep It Greasey" are self-explanatory). Still, in spite of its flaws, Joe's Garage has enough substance to make it one of Zappa's most important '70s works and overall political statements, even if it's not focused enough to rank with his earliest Mothers of Invention masterpieces.
© Steve Huey /TiVo

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